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Herbs

HEALTH
April 3, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
GUMMY VITES. Strawberry Flavored Fish Oil. Super Kids Salve. Gum-omile Oil. Children's Echinacea. Herbs for Kids. Squeezed onto the shelves of your local drugstore, near the baby aspirin and children's Robitussin, is a steadily growing crowd of colorful supplements and herbs specifically for children. To many parents, these products are a safe first-defense against the aches and pains of childhood, ones that can be tried before drugs with their sometimes risky side effects.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
From the window of the hospital clinic where he worked in East Los Angeles, Robert Krochmal used to look out at the unsightly lot next door and wonder who owned it. The half-acre property was littered with garbage and broken glass, its two crumbling structures defaced with gang signs. Krochmal, a UCLA medical student then doing his residency at nearby White Memorial Medical Center, did some investigating and found, to his surprise, that the lot was owned by the hospital.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, Wielawski is a Los Angeles free-lancer who writes about health for View.
Lindy Saenz came to the United States in 1973, after a war-blighted childhood in Vietnam. The Los Angeles hairdresser remembers the sound of gunshots only a few blocks from her family's Saigon home. But just as fearsome a memory, she says, is her mother's therapy for colds--"coin-rubbing" or "spooning," a popular Southeast Asian remedy that relies on an herbal lubricating ointment known as tiger balm.
HEALTH
January 10, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
When it came to taking herbs and vitamins, retired engineer Richard Sommers would try a handful of this and several capsules of that and sometimes feel a little better. But he began to think there was a better way. He consulted a doctor trained in alternative medicine to see if he was doing himself any harm by combining megadoses of such dietary supplements with powerful prescription drugs for his heart and thyroid problems. The internist immediately spotted problems in Sommers' regimen.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uri Falcha was strolling down Venice Beach in California one day three years ago when he hit upon the idea. He saw street vendors peddling organically grown weeds that looked like marijuana, smelled like marijuana and, supposedly, gave the high of marijuana, but without the cannabis. His first attempt at bringing some of the stuff home to Israel landed him in jail at the Tel Aviv airport.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
It is the fastest-growing "alternative" in a nation increasingly enchanted with unconventional and unproven treatments. A million or more Americans have lately tried St. John's wort, an herbal remedy for depression with 1998 retail sales estimated at $400 million--up 3,900% since 1995.
HOME & GARDEN
September 26, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Lawns, flower beds, vegetable patches and herb gardens. The segregation of these regions in our yards baffles landscape designer Sean Knibb. "Why can't all these things live together, more naturally, like you see in a meadow?" he asks. In three of his recent small-scale Los Angeles gardens, they do. Grasses, succulents, flowers, herbs and vegetables are woven together in beds and borders along with shrubs and trees. The results are lush and sophisticated explosions of color, texture and volume that reference English country gardens yet are sensitive to drought-prone California.
HEALTH
November 3, 1997 | JOHN HENDREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For years, German doctors have prescribed an herb called St. John's wort to lift sagging spirits. Now millions of Americans have started using it to lift drooping bellies and backsides as well. St. John's wort has soared in popularity as a weight-loss supplement ever since two diet drugs were pulled from the market in September. Half of the nearly 250,000 dieters at Nutri / System weight loss centers use the herb, which shows its golden flowers at their brightest around June 24--St.
WORLD
October 30, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
WHENEVER her son's arthritis becomes unbearable, Mery Aguilar heads to a stall in the Seventh of August farmers market, where she buys a big bag of flowers. Then she boils the petals and buds of the borrachero and ruda plants, which grow wild in the Andes, and adds the brew to a hot bath that is her son's only salvation from debilitating pain. "Sometimes," Aguilar said, "grandmothers' secrets are better than the doctors'."
BUSINESS
October 7, 1990 | SOON NEO LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year at this time, Wisconsin's Marathon County becomes a Chinatown, as 40 to 50 Chinese merchants from Hong Kong, San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles converge on the quiet farming community to buy a prized herb the Chinese consider an aphrodisiac--ginseng. Ginseng roots have been used for ages in Chinese medicine--chewed raw or brewed into tea--for illnesses and weaknesses. The Chinese believe that the bitter, man-shaped roots have a rejuvenating effect on the body.
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