Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHerbs
IN THE NEWS

Herbs

NEWS
September 1, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Tom Murdock founded a business that would grow into the nation's largest maker of herbal medicines, he found inspiration in Arizona's high desert. It was in the late 1960s and Murdock's wife, Lavoli, was gravely ill with cancer that hadn't responded to conventional treatments. Murdock had heard about a Navajo medicine man who touted a desert chaparral shrub as a remedy for ailments from colds to cancer.
Advertisement
FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
As I tasted an array of styles of amari at Sotto and Mozza, I became fascinated. I can see right now, I'm going to have to clear a cupboard for my growing collection. At Sotto, I was intrigued by Amaro Montenegro made in Bologna since the 1860s. It's very floral, with notes of rosewater, vanilla, citrus peel and, at the end, a pronounced bitterness. We tasted Amaro Nonino Quintessentia from the grappa producer using a family recipe from 1897, and Amaro Lucano from Matera in the south of Italy, made since 1894 in a more austere style that still includes more than 30 herbs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1986 | Herbert J. Vida
Ah, the splendor of herbs is just the right medicine for today's fast-food cooking crowd, says herbalist Joyce Smith of Fullerton, whose herb garden no doubt is the envy of her neighbors. It takes the place of her front lawn. "I spend about the same time on it as I would taking care of grass," she said while tending a garlic chives plant, one of the tasty specimens she grows in her tiered garden that includes roses for fragrance. "Instead of grass, I get something productive out of the land."
FOOD
August 12, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
Before it was Beach Boulevard, the Orange County road that leads straight to Huntington Beach was known as Highway 39. That was back when Clifford Ronnenberg's parents owned a dairy and roadside diner, which is now the site of the citified ParkAve restaurant. The retro-style neon spelling out the name at the edge of the parking lot shines like a beacon among tacky motels, new town houses and the usual strip malls. Stanton is not what you'd call fancy, more working class Orange County than upscale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL
It all seemed too good to be true. A candle to bring me the love of my life? A prayer to bring me success? Tarot cards that would tell my future? The promises of the curandera struck me as absurd. But in Sylmar, in a Latino neighborhood where immigrants bring with them old customs, you don't want to dismiss them too lightly. Curanderos, or healers, practice a mix of Spanish, Native American, Greek and Arabic traditions; some dateback to the Maya and Inca civilizations.
HOME & GARDEN
August 11, 2005
THANKS so much for the article on seed catalogs, "Our Kind of Summer Reading," [Aug. 4]. The only one I was familiar with was Seeds of Change, so I am eager to explore the others. I want to share with you my current favorite seed catalog, Turtle Tree Seed company, www.turtletreeseed.com.They offer biodynamic and organic seed, and list where the seed is cultivated in addition to offering good suggestions and descriptions. They offer vegetables, insect-attracting flowers, healing and culinary herbs, etc. I love these guys and hope you enjoy them too. ANNA BISSON Glendale
HEALTH
October 14, 2002 | Timothy Gower, Special to The Times
Herbs for prostate cancer? Doctors in this country have gone from ridiculing to recommending to once again rejecting the idea, all in a few years. But the debate over using natural therapy to treat this difficult disease is not over. Earlier this year, thousands of American men battling prostate cancer were stunned when the dietary supplement PC Spes was taken off the market.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|