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Herman Martin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1987
The survivors of murdered La Jolla attorney Richard Crake filed a $15-million lawsuit Tuesday against the U.S. government, alleging that the U.S. Marshals Service was responsible for the acts of a deputy marshal who obtained Crake's address for the man convicted of arranging his killing. Kathryn Crake and her children say the actions of James Murphy, who was relieved of his duties as a marshal after revealing his role in the case, were "the proximate cause" of Crake's murder in May, 1981.
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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Services were held Tuesday for Herman Martin, known in San Diego as a Solana Beach insurance executive whose second-degree murder conviction was overturned because of San Diego County prosecutors' misconduct. Martin, 68, was really Herman Goldfarb, a New Yorker who was moved to San Diego under the federal witness protection program after becoming an undercover informer in an FBI sting operation that led to more than a dozen indictments--and a contract on his life.
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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Services were held Tuesday for Herman Martin, known in San Diego as a Solana Beach insurance executive whose second-degree murder conviction was overturned because of San Diego County prosecutors' misconduct. Martin, 68, was really Herman Goldfarb, a New Yorker who was moved to San Diego under the federal witness protection program after becoming an undercover informer in an FBI sting operation that led to more than a dozen indictments--and a contract on his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1987
The survivors of murdered La Jolla attorney Richard Crake filed a $15-million lawsuit Tuesday against the U.S. government, alleging that the U.S. Marshals Service was responsible for the acts of a deputy marshal who obtained Crake's address for the man convicted of arranging his killing. Kathryn Crake and her children say the actions of James Murphy, who was relieved of his duties as a marshal after revealing his role in the case, were "the proximate cause" of Crake's murder in May, 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1986 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
The retired judge investigating the murder conviction of insurance executive Herman Martin on behalf of the state Supreme Court recommended Friday that the one-time federal informant be freed from prison while his case is on appeal. Gerald Brown, former presiding judge of the 4th District Court of Appeal, had ruled in August that Martin, 65, was wrongly convicted of masterminding the May, 1981, murder of La Jolla attorney Richard Crake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Herman Martin, whose 1982 second-degree murder conviction was overturned because of San Diego County prosecutors' misconduct, has pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the killing of a La Jolla attorney. In exchange for the 68-year-old Martin's plea, the California attorney general's office agreed that the Solana Beach insurance executive will receive credit for the four-plus years already spent in prison from 1982 to 1987 and serve no more time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Services were held Tuesday for Herman Martin, known in San Diego as a Solana Beach insurance executive whose second-degree murder conviction was overturned because of San Diego County prosecutors' misconduct. Martin, 68, was really Herman Goldfarb, a New Yorker who was relocated to San Diego under the federal witness protection program after becoming an undercover informer in an FBI sting operation that led to more than a dozen indictments--and a contract on his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Herman Martin, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the killing of a La Jolla lawyer after Martin's 1982 second-degree murder conviction was overturned on grounds of prosecutors' misconduct, was sentenced Wednesday to the four-plus years already spent in prison. Martin, 68, a former Solana Beach insurance executive, received credit from San Diego Superior Court Judge Jesus Rodriguez for time served in prison from 1982 to 1987 and received no additional time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday barred San Diego County prosecutors from the retrial of a San Diego insurance executive accused of murder, by declining to review a ruling that Dist. Atty. Edwin Miller had lost his "perspective" in the case. The high court's action left standing a decision issued in June by the 4th District Court of Appeal in San Diego, upholding San Diego Superior Court Judge J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge ruled Friday that San Diego County Dist. Atty. Edwin Miller has lost his "perspective" and ordered Miller's office to step down from prosecuting the murder case against a San Diego insurance executive. The executive had won a new trial on the murder charge after the state Supreme Court found "serious misconduct" by prosecutors. Superior Court Judge J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1986 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
The retired judge investigating the murder conviction of insurance executive Herman Martin on behalf of the state Supreme Court recommended Friday that the one-time federal informant be freed from prison while his case is on appeal. Gerald Brown, former presiding judge of the 4th District Court of Appeal, had ruled in August that Martin, 65, was wrongly convicted of masterminding the May, 1981, murder of La Jolla attorney Richard Crake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | KAY HWANGBO
Jim O'Riley got off the phone in a state of shock. His neighbor had just informed him that his home in Frazier Park, south of the Grapevine, had burned to the ground. What he did next was the only thing that made sense to him at that point: He finished watching his son's karate tournament. "I was in shock, but I was there for my son," said the 19-year-veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department. "There was nothing I could do for my house."
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