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Hermann Goering

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Romulus Linney's "2," at Theatre 40, is about a defiant Hermann Goering plotting his defense and heroic demise during the Nuremberg war crimes trials. Yet this production lacks a charismatic stage presence at its center, as well as strong supporting performances. As Goering, Milt Kogan towers over the other actors, including his armed guards. With this physical advantage, Kogan blusters and dominates the ensemble.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Never before seen on U.S. screens, the documentary "Nuremberg: Its Lesson For Today" compels us as much because of its complicated and fascinating history as for what it has to show, which is a lot. Written and directed in 1948 by Stuart Schulberg and meticulously brought back to life by his daughter Sandra Schulberg and Josh Waletzky, "Nuremberg" was commissioned by the U.S. War Department to answer a very specific need. Once the November 1945 to October 1946 Nuremberg trial of top Nazi leaders, including Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess and Albert Speer, was concluded, the Allies wanted a film that would both show what had happened in the courtroom and demonstrate why such a trial for, among other things, "crimes against humanity" had been necessary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Richard W. Sonnenfeldt, the chief interpreter for American prosecutors at the Nuremberg war crimes trials, has died. He was 86. Sonnenfeldt died Friday at his home in Port Washington, N.Y., of complications from a stroke, said his wife, Barbara. Assigned to the International Military Tribunal, Sonnenfeldt interrogated some of World War II's most notorious Nazi leaders, including Hitler's second-in-command, Hermann Goering; Albert Speer, who headed Germany's war manufacturing; and Reich minister Rudolf Hess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Richard W. Sonnenfeldt, the chief interpreter for American prosecutors at the Nuremberg war crimes trials, has died. He was 86. Sonnenfeldt died Friday at his home in Port Washington, N.Y., of complications from a stroke, said his wife, Barbara. Assigned to the International Military Tribunal, Sonnenfeldt interrogated some of World War II's most notorious Nazi leaders, including Hitler's second-in-command, Hermann Goering; Albert Speer, who headed Germany's war manufacturing; and Reich minister Rudolf Hess.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994
Regarding "The Rape of Europa" (Book Review, June 12): It's a mistake to assume that because a man is a psychopath and monster, he's corrupt in every respect. Your reviewer states: "Hitler established an ambitious acquisition program--both for himself and for the Reich." That's incorrect. Albert Speer, one of Hitler's closest associates, states in "Inside the Third Reich": "Hitler did not utilize his authority for his private ends. He did not keep in his own possession a single one of the paintings he acquired or confiscated in the occupied territories."
OPINION
April 5, 2003
Anne Burley (letter, April 1) risks overstating her case when she says London's "entire East End disappeared" because of German bombing in World War II. I lived in the East End until recently, and my house had been built in 1826. Huge damage was inflicted by the Luftwaffe, but only a fraction of the housing stock was destroyed. However, there are interesting parallels between that war and this. Churchill's contingency plans for a German invasion involved the use of chemical weapons (mustard gas)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Never before seen on U.S. screens, the documentary "Nuremberg: Its Lesson For Today" compels us as much because of its complicated and fascinating history as for what it has to show, which is a lot. Written and directed in 1948 by Stuart Schulberg and meticulously brought back to life by his daughter Sandra Schulberg and Josh Waletzky, "Nuremberg" was commissioned by the U.S. War Department to answer a very specific need. Once the November 1945 to October 1946 Nuremberg trial of top Nazi leaders, including Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess and Albert Speer, was concluded, the Allies wanted a film that would both show what had happened in the courtroom and demonstrate why such a trial for, among other things, "crimes against humanity" had been necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
Joseph Kingsbury-Smith, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who gained exclusive interviews with generally secretive Soviet officials during the Cold War, has died. Kingsbury-Smith died Wednesday at his home in a Virginia suburb of Washington. He was 90. Born in New York, he started his 60-year career and long association with the Hearst chain in 1924, when his "desire for adventure" led to a job as a copy boy at Hearst national headquarters in New York.
WORLD
September 6, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The German government has asked Italy to investigate whether an Italian wine with labels depicting Adolf Hitler and fellow Nazis Hermann Goering and Heinrich Himmler violates a European Union resolution on combating the spread of racist images and literature. German tourists are importing the wine and can buy it on the Internet. German law forbids the use of Nazi symbols. The wine producer said the bottles were chiefly for the German market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1990
The Air Force officials who are so quick to make bold statements about how their planes would end a war with Iraq in a matter of hours have very short memories. They ought to re-read what Hermann Goering promised his Luftwaffe would to to London and England. DON KUMFERMAN Ridgecrest
OPINION
April 5, 2003
Anne Burley (letter, April 1) risks overstating her case when she says London's "entire East End disappeared" because of German bombing in World War II. I lived in the East End until recently, and my house had been built in 1826. Huge damage was inflicted by the Luftwaffe, but only a fraction of the housing stock was destroyed. However, there are interesting parallels between that war and this. Churchill's contingency plans for a German invasion involved the use of chemical weapons (mustard gas)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Romulus Linney's "2," at Theatre 40, is about a defiant Hermann Goering plotting his defense and heroic demise during the Nuremberg war crimes trials. Yet this production lacks a charismatic stage presence at its center, as well as strong supporting performances. As Goering, Milt Kogan towers over the other actors, including his armed guards. With this physical advantage, Kogan blusters and dominates the ensemble.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994
Regarding "The Rape of Europa" (Book Review, June 12): It's a mistake to assume that because a man is a psychopath and monster, he's corrupt in every respect. Your reviewer states: "Hitler established an ambitious acquisition program--both for himself and for the Reich." That's incorrect. Albert Speer, one of Hitler's closest associates, states in "Inside the Third Reich": "Hitler did not utilize his authority for his private ends. He did not keep in his own possession a single one of the paintings he acquired or confiscated in the occupied territories."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the most baffling mysteries of the World War II era. How did convicted war criminal Hermann Goering manage to poison himself as U.S. soldiers prepared to hang him? A dozen competing theories have swirled for nearly half a century about how the onetime Nazi second in command was able to commit suicide despite around-the-clock surveillance of his military prison cell.
NEWS
January 19, 1989
Ernie Blake, 75, who served with U.S. military intelligence during World War II and helped interrogate captured Nazi leaders. Blake, who later founded the Taos (N.M.) Ski Valley resort, was born Ernest Bloch in Germany and grew up near the Swiss ski resort of St. Moritz. In 1938, he moved to the United States. He returned to Germany for the Nuremberg war crime trials and helped question Hermann Goering, Albert Speer and other top Nazi figures. In Albuquerque, N.M., on Saturday.
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