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Hermann Maier

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October 14, 2009 | Eric Sondheimer, Staff and Wire Reports
Two-time Olympic champion Hermann Maier retired Tuesday, ending a career in which he became one of Alpine skiing's most prolific racers and almost lost a leg in a motorcycle accident in 2001. The 36-year-old Maier cited surgery on his right knee in the off-season as the main reason for his retirement. The Austrian speed specialist won two golds at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, and earned three world championship titles. He won 54 World Cup races and four overall titles, putting him second only to Sweden's Ingemar Stenmark , who captured 86 race victories.
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February 13, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
The list of men who have won the coveted Olympic downhill crown is nearly as impressive as the list of men who haven't. Hermann Maier, the Austrian known as the "Herminator," claimed 54 World Cup victories in his illustrious career. But he never snared the big one, although he almost died trying at the 1998 Nagano Games. Marc Giradelli, representing tiny Luxembourg, won five World Cup overall titles but never gold in downhill. Bode Miller, the greatest male skier in U.S. history, has been downhill-denied, as was Daron Rahlves, the former U.S. ski team star who won more World Cup downhills, nine, than any other American male.
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August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
Standout skier Hermann Maier broke his right leg in a motorcycle accident Friday and could miss the Salt Lake City Olympics. The reigning World Cup champion was hurt at the Salzburg ski resort of Radstadt when he landed in a ditch trying to avoid a collision with a car, the Austrian Press Agency reported. Maier, who also suffered other minor injuries, was rushed by helicopter to the Accident Hospital in Salzburg, where he had surgery.
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October 14, 2009 | Eric Sondheimer, Staff and Wire Reports
Two-time Olympic champion Hermann Maier retired Tuesday, ending a career in which he became one of Alpine skiing's most prolific racers and almost lost a leg in a motorcycle accident in 2001. The 36-year-old Maier cited surgery on his right knee in the off-season as the main reason for his retirement. The Austrian speed specialist won two golds at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, and earned three world championship titles. He won 54 World Cup races and four overall titles, putting him second only to Sweden's Ingemar Stenmark , who captured 86 race victories.
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February 9, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Hermann Maier, the "Hermannator," the superstar of skiing, said he was raring to go and raced at "105%" capacity in an Alpine downhill training run. Asked if he could do better, Maier said, "For the race itself, I am going to ski at 150%." OK, good to see Hermann try harder. BRONZE EARTHLING The man with two countries, Bart Veldkamp, has two bronze medals . . . one for the Netherlands, one for Belgium. He won one in 1994 at Lillehammer, in speedskating's 10,000 meters.
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February 8, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A last-minute snowstorm swept across the Happo'one course Sunday morning, postponing the Olympic men's downhill and the seemingly inevitable coronation of a new snow king. Austrian Hermann Maier's quest to join Toni Sailer and Jean-Claude Killy as the only Alpine skiers to win three gold medals in the same Olympics was put on hold--officials will try to run the downhill Monday--but Maier has grown accustomed to waiting for his precious moments in the snow.
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February 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hermann Maier had built up far too much speed on the icy course and lost control just a few seconds into the Olympic downhill he was expected to win. As he tumbled through the air, he had one thought: "Not Lufthansa, but OK," he recounted with a grin a few hours after the spectacular crash, when his head had stopped pounding but his body still felt like a punching bag.
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February 16, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bruised but unbowed, Austria's Hermann Maier overcame the physical and mental fallout from one of the most spectacular crashes in alpine skiing history and won the super-giant slalom at the Winter Olympics on Monday. To everyone but Maier, it seemed easy. His time was 1 minute, 34.82 seconds, more than six-tenths of a second faster than the 1:35.43 of the co-silver medalists, Didier Cuche of Switzerland and Hans Knauss of Austria.
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February 11, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Skier Hermann Maier let out a scream around the finish at the world championships, a major title finally his again. His victory in the giant slalom Thursday at Bormio, Italy, was another inspirational step in his recovery from a 2001 motorcycle accident in which he nearly lost a leg. This was the Austrian's first gold medal at the world championships since he won two in 1999 in Vail, Colo.
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January 21, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Austrian Hermann Maier, a two-time Olympic champion, won a World Cup super-G on the famed Hahnenkamm course in Kitzbuehel, Austria, on Friday, defending his title from last year and getting his second victory of the season. "This course was custom-made for me," Maier said. "There was a lot of snow in the last two days and it was hard for the skiers with high numbers, but I found the right balance between smooth and aggressive skiing."
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February 12, 2006 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
The question of whether Austrian hero Hermann Maier can go down as one of the greatest skiers in history without winning an Olympic downhill has been answered. In German, the answer is ja. Maier, no matter what happens in today's race, rates as one of the best kilogram-for-kilogram racers in Alpine annals. He has won two Olympic gold medals, four World Cup overall titles, three world championships and 53 World Cup races.
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January 21, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Austrian Hermann Maier, a two-time Olympic champion, won a World Cup super-G on the famed Hahnenkamm course in Kitzbuehel, Austria, on Friday, defending his title from last year and getting his second victory of the season. "This course was custom-made for me," Maier said. "There was a lot of snow in the last two days and it was hard for the skiers with high numbers, but I found the right balance between smooth and aggressive skiing."
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February 11, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Skier Hermann Maier let out a scream around the finish at the world championships, a major title finally his again. His victory in the giant slalom Thursday at Bormio, Italy, was another inspirational step in his recovery from a 2001 motorcycle accident in which he nearly lost a leg. This was the Austrian's first gold medal at the world championships since he won two in 1999 in Vail, Colo.
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March 14, 2004 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hermann Maier completed a great comeback from a motorcycle accident three years ago in which he nearly lost a leg, winning the World Cup Alpine skiing overall title Saturday. Bode Miller ended up winning the giant slalom title after the event in Sestriere, Italy, was canceled because of heavy snowfall and thick fog. The race was called midway through the second run, giving Miller the discipline title and Maier his fourth overall crown. Miller, of Franconia, N.H.
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January 24, 2004 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Daron Rahlves of Sugar Bowl, Calif., won a World Cup super-giant slalom Friday and in so doing, finished ahead of two Austrian stars skiing in their home country. Racing down the steep and treacherous run in 1 minute 23.08 seconds, Rahlves became the first non-Austrian to win a super-giant slalom on Hahnenkamm mountain in Kitzbuehel. Austrian Olympic champion Hermann Maier won the event the last three years. "It doesn't matter who I beat, it just matters that I win," Rahlves said.
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December 7, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hermann Maier won a World Cup downhill Saturday at Beaver Creek, Colo., barely two years after a motorcycle accident that nearly cost him his right leg. Maier claimed his second victory of the season and 44th overall by finishing nearly a second ahead of teammate Hans Knauss to lead an Austrian sweep of the top three places. Maier was clocked in 1 minute 39.76 seconds; Knauss was timed in 1:40.71. Andreas Schifferer was third in 1:40.95 on the difficult Birds of Prey course.
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March 14, 2004 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hermann Maier completed a great comeback from a motorcycle accident three years ago in which he nearly lost a leg, winning the World Cup Alpine skiing overall title Saturday. Bode Miller ended up winning the giant slalom title after the event in Sestriere, Italy, was canceled because of heavy snowfall and thick fog. The race was called midway through the second run, giving Miller the discipline title and Maier his fourth overall crown. Miller, of Franconia, N.H.
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December 7, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hermann Maier won a World Cup downhill Saturday at Beaver Creek, Colo., barely two years after a motorcycle accident that nearly cost him his right leg. Maier claimed his second victory of the season and 44th overall by finishing nearly a second ahead of teammate Hans Knauss to lead an Austrian sweep of the top three places. Maier was clocked in 1 minute 39.76 seconds; Knauss was timed in 1:40.71. Andreas Schifferer was third in 1:40.95 on the difficult Birds of Prey course.
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January 28, 2003 | From Associated Press
Hermann Maier wept after the race, his lip trembling as he spoke of all he has gone through since almost losing his leg in a motorcycle accident. The Austrian star captured a World Cup super giant slalom Monday at Kitzbuehel, Austria, a victory that he ranked among his finest triumphs and it came nearly two years after he last won. "I never thought I would win again so quickly," he said. "I'm over the moon. I am totally moved."
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January 15, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hermann Maier skied his first race since nearly losing a leg in a motorcycle crash 18 months ago, and just failed to qualify for the second run of a World Cup giant slalom at Adelboden, Switzerland, won by Austrian teammate Hans Knauss. Knauss won for the first time this season and was followed by world giant slalom champion Michael von Gruenigen of Switzerland and Kjetil-Andre Aamodt of Norway. Daron Rahlves was the top U.S. skier in 22nd place.
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