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Hermine J Weinberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Most of a Beverly Hills woman's $20-million estate--contested by her husband, who was cut out of her will just two days before her suicide--will go to a Jewish anti-drug program in Los Angeles and two other charities under a settlement reached Wednesday. Attorneys for the husband, wealthy real estate developer William Weinberg, 59, agreed to the settlement despite the fact that he and their two teen-age children, Marc, 18, and Elizabeth, 17, get no money.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Most of a Beverly Hills woman's $20-million estate--contested by her husband, who was cut out of her will just two days before her suicide--will go to a Jewish anti-drug program in Los Angeles and two other charities under a settlement reached Wednesday. Attorneys for the husband, wealthy real estate developer William Weinberg, 59, agreed to the settlement despite the fact that he and their two teen-age children, Marc, 18, and Elizabeth, 17, get no money.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of its yearly telethon, Chabad of California finds itself busier than ever and, as usual, strapped for cash, according to Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Cunin, the sect's charismatic leader. But this year is different, because the Hasidic sect is enmeshed in a bitter squabble that focuses on a Jewish student housing co-op near UCLA and has riled many in the Jewish community.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"Can Chabad Outlive the Rebbe?" asked the headline in a recent edition of a leading Jewish journal, as the 92-year-old leader of one of Judaism's most aggressive and charismatic sects lay comatose in a New York hospital. After the death Sunday of Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the seventh leader, or rebbe , of the Chabad Lubavitch movement, that question is at hand. At stake is the future of an organization that Schneerson personally transformed in his 44 years of leadership from a provincial sect into what Allen Nadler, an expert on the group's activities, describes as the "most famous and powerful movement in contemporary Orthodox Judaism."
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