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NEWS
September 21, 1986 | From Reuters
One of the world's greatest art museums, the Hermitage in Leningrad, will enter the 21st Century with a new look under restoration plans due to begin next year, the newspaper Soviet Culture reported Saturday. Hermitage director Boris Piotrovsky told the newspaper that the museum will remain open throughout the restoration work, due for completion in the year 2005, although galleries housing its vast collections would close temporarily.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
City officials are threatening to sell paintings from the collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art to pay off a $3-million construction bond that comes due in September. Not since Josef Stalin has a civic fiscal plan been quite so dumb. During the winter of 1929-30, as stock markets crashed and the Great Depression brought the global economy to its knees, the Soviet dictator put into action a scheme to raise hard currency -- and fast. Trolling through the vast art collections of the Hermitage Museum, a staggering czarist accumulation that had been nationalized by the Russian revolution, Stalin consummated plans to sell paintings to collectors in the West.
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NEWS
October 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boris B. Piotrovsky, director of the world-renowned Hermitage Museum and an authority on the ancient civilization of Urartu, which flourished in what is now Armenia more than 2,500 years ago, has died in Leningrad of a cerebral hemorrhage, the Soviet news agency Tass said. Piotrovsky, who was 82 when he died Monday, became internationally famous in 1939 for his discovery of Urartu.
NEWS
August 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Russian police said Wednesday that a private collector had returned a silver-framed icon to them, making it the 13th object to be recovered from the missing Hermitage artworks, the Interfax news agency reported. More than a week ago, the Hermitage -- Russia's most famous museum -- announced the theft over a period of years of more than 220 artworks valued at $5 million.
BOOKS
June 11, 1995 | Susan Reynolds
HIDDEN TREASURES REVEALED: Impressionist Masterpieces and Other Important French Paintings Preserved by the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg by Albert Kostenevich. (The Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation, The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg in association with Harry N. Abrams: $49.95, 292 pp.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | Associated Press
A $500,000 glass bowl dating from the 3rd Century BC was stolen from the Hermitage Museum, reports said Wednesday. The six-inch bowl, made of glass and gold leaf in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, was kept in a back room of the museum, which has outdated security and fire alarm systems. Last year, thieves stole two vases and some Roman coins. The Hermitage recently signed a $2.5-million contract with Minnesota-based Honeywell Inc. to install a better alarm system and artificial climate
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The arrest of the son and husband of a late museum curator suspected of involvement in the theft of items from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, has focused attention on the appallingly lax security and record keeping that has become so common at many of that country's cash-strapped museums since the 1991 Soviet collapse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2001
Snooty snobs feel "a tremendous amount of anxiety" because works of art that were once accessible by a select few who could afford to travel to museums such as the Hermitage Museum in Russia can now be seen by commoners with limited means ("Doubling Down on Art" by Tom Gorman, Oct. 7). To enjoy world-class art displayed in a museum that is connected to a casino will not result in "turning art into a commodity, an entertainment experience" as Richard Koshalek, former director of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, fears may happen, just as having a meal in a world-class restaurant adjoining a casino will not turn the food into the quality and experience of fast food.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to capitalize on expectations of high foreign attendance to its newly opened, widely publicized exhibition of 74 French paintings stolen from Germany at the end of World War II, St. Petersburg's cash-strapped State Hermitage Museum has initiated a small-scale fund-raising gimmick unusual for the venerable institution. Five thousand tickets, their printing costs underwritten by Coca-Cola of St.
BOOKS
December 4, 1994 | ALBERT HOXIE, Albert Hoxie is retired from the UCLA history department
"Great Art Treasures of the Hermitage Museum," a handsomely boxed, two-volume work that weighs in at over 20 pounds, is one of the luxury items in bookstores this season. In that category, however, it is a real bargain, with over 1,500 impeccably produced color photographs and a succinct series of texts and labels written by the curatorial staff, full of precise and valuable information. It is unusual in its stress on the extraordinary diversity of the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The arrest of the son and husband of a late museum curator suspected of involvement in the theft of items from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, has focused attention on the appallingly lax security and record keeping that has become so common at many of that country's cash-strapped museums since the 1991 Soviet collapse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2001
Snooty snobs feel "a tremendous amount of anxiety" because works of art that were once accessible by a select few who could afford to travel to museums such as the Hermitage Museum in Russia can now be seen by commoners with limited means ("Doubling Down on Art" by Tom Gorman, Oct. 7). To enjoy world-class art displayed in a museum that is connected to a casino will not result in "turning art into a commodity, an entertainment experience" as Richard Koshalek, former director of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, fears may happen, just as having a meal in a world-class restaurant adjoining a casino will not turn the food into the quality and experience of fast food.
BOOKS
June 11, 1995 | Susan Reynolds
HIDDEN TREASURES REVEALED: Impressionist Masterpieces and Other Important French Paintings Preserved by the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg by Albert Kostenevich. (The Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation, The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg in association with Harry N. Abrams: $49.95, 292 pp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to capitalize on expectations of high foreign attendance to its newly opened, widely publicized exhibition of 74 French paintings stolen from Germany at the end of World War II, St. Petersburg's cash-strapped State Hermitage Museum has initiated a small-scale fund-raising gimmick unusual for the venerable institution. Five thousand tickets, their printing costs underwritten by Coca-Cola of St.
BOOKS
December 4, 1994 | ALBERT HOXIE, Albert Hoxie is retired from the UCLA history department
"Great Art Treasures of the Hermitage Museum," a handsomely boxed, two-volume work that weighs in at over 20 pounds, is one of the luxury items in bookstores this season. In that category, however, it is a real bargain, with over 1,500 impeccably produced color photographs and a succinct series of texts and labels written by the curatorial staff, full of precise and valuable information. It is unusual in its stress on the extraordinary diversity of the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The woes of St. Petersburg's venerable Hermitage Museum are not a Russian state secret. Ever since the mid-1980s when glasnost and perestroika opened the former Soviet Union's doors to Western reporters and loosened the lips of the museum's staff, press reports have sounded alarms about crumbling plaster, peeling paint, faulty plumbing and inadequate security--all of which endanger one of the world's greatest art collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The woes of St. Petersburg's venerable Hermitage Museum are not a Russian state secret. Ever since the mid-1980s when glasnost and perestroika opened the former Soviet Union's doors to Western reporters and loosened the lips of the museum's staff, press reports have sounded alarms about crumbling plaster, peeling paint, faulty plumbing and inadequate security--all of which endanger one of the world's greatest art collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "most famous woman in Russia" was there. So was Zsa Zsa Gabor. And Mr. Blackwell. And Cesar Romero. And Lindsay Wagner. And Vince Edwards. And the actor who played Ensign Chekov in "Star Trek." They came to the Armand Hammer Museum in Westwood to announce plans for "SpaceBridge 92," in which celebrities here will speak via satellite television to their counterparts at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg on the night of the Academy Awards ceremony March 30.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | Associated Press
A $500,000 glass bowl dating from the 3rd Century BC was stolen from the Hermitage Museum, reports said Wednesday. The six-inch bowl, made of glass and gold leaf in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, was kept in a back room of the museum, which has outdated security and fire alarm systems. Last year, thieves stole two vases and some Roman coins. The Hermitage recently signed a $2.5-million contract with Minnesota-based Honeywell Inc. to install a better alarm system and artificial climate
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the world's greatest museums was nearly destroyed a few months ago by a forgotten cup of tea. A worker in the fabric section of the Hermitage's Russian History Department had plugged in an electric tea kettle but then forgot about it. The water boiled away, the kettle burned up, the curtains caught fire, and suddenly the Hermitage--home of Rembrandt and Rodin, Matisse and Manet, Scythian gold and Egyptian sarcophagi--was in mortal danger.
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