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Hernando Cortez

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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the father of your country were best known for cutting down an Aztec emperor rather than a cherry tree, would you honor him with a monument? While American textbooks illuminate the most honorable qualities of George Washington, official Mexican lore has vilified the father of modern Mexico, Spanish conqueror Hernando Cortes. To many Mexicans, Cortes is a symbol of rape and plunder. He tore down Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire, and imposed Spanish rule over Indian civilization.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the father of your country were best known for cutting down an Aztec emperor rather than a cherry tree, would you honor him with a monument? While American textbooks illuminate the most honorable qualities of George Washington, official Mexican lore has vilified the father of modern Mexico, Spanish conqueror Hernando Cortes. To many Mexicans, Cortes is a symbol of rape and plunder. He tore down Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire, and imposed Spanish rule over Indian civilization.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1996 | JENNIFER FISHER
There were no surprises on the Paul Taylor Dance Company program Thursday night at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Those who knew the 41-year-old company at all saw familiar favorites, and newcomers were introduced to a world where dancers float lyrically one moment and paw the ground the next in "Cloven Kingdom" (1976), pop like corn in "Syzygy" (1987) and smile or sigh through the original playground version of Bach, "Esplanade" (1975).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
In the 18th century world of religious literature, there was a special place reserved for a collection of engravings and treatises called "Ceremonies and Religious Customs of All the Peoples of the World": It was on the "Index Librorum Prohibitorum"-- the Vatican's list of prohibited books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
These days, it's tough being an 18th-Century monarch. Just ask, if you could, King Carlos III, the Spanish king who in 1781 ordered the creation of El Pueblo de La Reina de Los Angeles--or simply L.A. Carlos took a bashing Wednesday. The bashing was delivered by, of all people, the Los Angeles City Council. Never mind, for the moment, that the council had assumed it was bashing King Ferdinand of the 15th Century.
TRAVEL
December 11, 1988 | JENNIFER MERIN, Merin is a New York City free-lance writer .
Colonial Taxco, that charming old mining town high in Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains (about 2 1/2 hours by car from Mexico City), holds to its reputation as the nation's Silver City. With more than 100 shops, visitors choose from an array of silver bracelets, baubles, rings, bangles, earrings, beads, wedding bands, goblets, baskets, boxes, handbags, tea sets, platters and decorative plaques.
FOOD
February 9, 1989
Valentine's Day is the one day when nearly everyone abandons their vows and gives into cravings for chocolate. If you or your sweetheart have an affinity for chocolate, then the scrumptious offerings here should make this Tuesday that much more special. Chocolate has enjoyed a comfortable position in the diets of Americans--for a long time popular as an addition to baked goods like cookies, cakes, candies and pies as well as for its appeal straight from the package.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | Marylouise Oates
They gathered last Friday at Hernando's Hideaway in the Beverly Wilshire for a last lunch, a last drink. More than two years ago, the Regent Hotel Chain purchased the great hotel that anchors Rodeo Drive and the Hideaway, with its leather bar and mariachis and McCarthy salads, just isn't quite the style its new owners are seeking. Style was always a great commodity at the hotel, and no movie mogul ever promoted a star the way the late and legendary Hernando Courtright spotlighted his hostelry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
He probably never set foot on the beach that bears his name. He may not even be buried on the island where a memorial marker has stood for nearly seven decades. But none of that matters to a group of history-loving San Pedro residents and volunteers. For 37 years, on the first Saturday after Labor Day, the group that calls itself the Cabrillo Landing Party disembarks ceremonially on San Miguel Island.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | GORDON SMITH
The fate of Spanish explorer Francisco de Ulloa has become hazy in the centuries since he set sail northward from Mexico in 1539, and around him has grown a tale of a Spanish galleon with $11 million in Aztec gold that sank somewhere near Oceanside. Ulloa was assigned by Hernando Cortez to explore the Gulf of California and the Pacific coast to the north of it. With three ships--the Santo Tomas, the Santa Agueda and the Trinidad--he set sail from Acapulco on July 8, 1539.
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