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Hernando De Soto

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NEWS
April 21, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who won respect for Peru's squatters and street vendors now wants to apply his capitalist thinking to the nation's coca-growing peasants--and in the process, get them out of the cocaine business. Hernando de Soto, one of Latin America's most renowned analysts of the problems of poverty, hopes to make property owners of up to 200,000 farmers now growing illegal coca.
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BOOKS
November 19, 2000 | JOHN GRAY, John Gray is the author of "Two Faces of Liberalism" and professor of European thought at the London School of Economics
Only in the last two or three years has doubt about the future of global capitalism become respectable. Until 1998, the experts and pundits who advise governments and shape public opinion on the state of the world economy were uniformly ragingly bullish. There might be some turmoil in Asian currency markets, but it was nothing much to worry about.
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NEWS
January 17, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Berkeley, as I recently discovered, allows its municipal employees to observe "Indigenous Cultures Appreciation Day" on what most of us regard as Columbus Day, a fact that struck me as faintly comical until I happened to read David Ewing Duncan's biography of the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. "A man of thunder and passion, of towering ambition and brutal resolve, he epitomized everything epic, petty, grand and horrific about the conquista," Duncan writes.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Berkeley, as I recently discovered, allows its municipal employees to observe "Indigenous Cultures Appreciation Day" on what most of us regard as Columbus Day, a fact that struck me as faintly comical until I happened to read David Ewing Duncan's biography of the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. "A man of thunder and passion, of towering ambition and brutal resolve, he epitomized everything epic, petty, grand and horrific about the conquista," Duncan writes.
BOOKS
January 22, 1989 | Robert Harvey, Harvey is the author of "Fire Down Below" (Simon & Schuster) published in November.
The Peruvian novelist, Mario Vargas Llosa, tells us in his introduction to Hernando de Soto's book that "economists occasionally tell better stories than novelists." He was being kind about De Soto's style, if not his content. "The Other Path," as most such works, makes for pretty dense reading, although at least it forsakes the higher flights of theoretical economics for solid, research-based analysis. But it is by any standards an important book.
BOOKS
November 19, 2000 | JOHN GRAY, John Gray is the author of "Two Faces of Liberalism" and professor of European thought at the London School of Economics
Only in the last two or three years has doubt about the future of global capitalism become respectable. Until 1998, the experts and pundits who advise governments and shape public opinion on the state of the world economy were uniformly ragingly bullish. There might be some turmoil in Asian currency markets, but it was nothing much to worry about.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Legislation to create a national historic trail along the routes traveled by the Cherokees during their forced removal from North Carolina to Oklahoma was approved Wednesday by the House Interior Committee. The bill, cleared for floor action by a voice vote, would authorize the Interior Department to mark the water route used by 3,000 Cherokees in 1838 and the principal overland route used in 1838-9.
OPINION
October 11, 2003
Re "A Role Model for Rape, Pillage, Plunder," Commentary, Oct. 6: To summarize Crispin Sartwell's eighth-grade essay on Hernando de Soto: He was treated as a hero in his own country. He led an expedition to invade another country and civilization based on unsubstantiated rumors of what he would find. The country was primitively armed relative to the state-of-the-art weapons his smaller but more effective warriors carried. He unleashed his war dogs, defeated the country, hunted down and killed or imprisoned its leaders, seized control of its resources, had himself and his deputies appointed as governors to run the country, kept searching in vain for the rumored prize of his invasion and conquest, ultimately failed and now can only look to revisionist history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
An ancient copper coin found at the winter campsite of Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto may be the oldest European-minted coin ever found in North America, archeologists said last week. The coin, about 475 years old, was found less than a mile from Florida's Capitol in Tallahassee. Archeologists have been digging at the site since construction workers unearthed Indian and Spanish artifacts in March.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2002
Re: "Amid Middle East Strife, a New Focus on Economies," James Flanigan, March 17: I hope you can give some "ink" to the solution proposed by Hernando de Soto, president of the Institute for Liberty and Democracy in Lima, Peru. In essence, his concept is to ultimately eliminate the need for foreign aid on the part of the U.S. There is so much potential for internal growth and capital creation in these areas. However, the legal processes in place make it virtually impossible for ordinary people in these countries to create and expand capital.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who won respect for Peru's squatters and street vendors now wants to apply his capitalist thinking to the nation's coca-growing peasants--and in the process, get them out of the cocaine business. Hernando de Soto, one of Latin America's most renowned analysts of the problems of poverty, hopes to make property owners of up to 200,000 farmers now growing illegal coca.
BOOKS
January 22, 1989 | Robert Harvey, Harvey is the author of "Fire Down Below" (Simon & Schuster) published in November.
The Peruvian novelist, Mario Vargas Llosa, tells us in his introduction to Hernando de Soto's book that "economists occasionally tell better stories than novelists." He was being kind about De Soto's style, if not his content. "The Other Path," as most such works, makes for pretty dense reading, although at least it forsakes the higher flights of theoretical economics for solid, research-based analysis. But it is by any standards an important book.
BOOKS
February 18, 1996 | Gary Phillips, Gary Phillips has family land in the Mississippi Delta. His second mystery novel, "Perdition, U.S.A.," will be out in May from John Brown Books
Like a sardonic blues refrain by Willie Dixon from Vicksburg or Charlie Patton off the Dockery Farms, the lessons of Mississippi offer hope and ruin. Wrestling with that burden of memory, writer Anthony Walton, who is African American, sets out in "Mississippi: An American Journey" to discover the place his father couldn't wait to get away from. Early on, Walton provides a violent backdrop to the state once known for having the highest number of lynchings within its borders.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Often, what is called democracy in South America would be barely recognizable in North America. The word is used loosely to mean civilian government, which now exists in all the continent's 12 independent nations. But in Brazil and Argentina, presidents can make laws by decree. The armed forces often are seen as arbiters of democracy and have great political influence.
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