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Hero Worship

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | Jane Lieberman
Producers Debra Hill and Lynda Obst move from teen comedy ("Adventures in Babysitting") to fantasy with their next project for Paramount--"Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.," based on the 1960s Marvel Comics character. He's not your typical caped or masked superhero, nor even Bondian. The tough, one-eyed S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (for Supreme Headquarters International Espionage Law-enforcement Division) favors cigars and a blood-stained trenchcoat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From horseback, he gazes out across parks and boulevards all over the American South. He lends his name to high schools, colleges and the iconic Dodge Charger in "The Dukes of Hazzard. " To some followers he's "the marble man," born to be made into statuary. So it's tempting for people today who don't see Gen. Robert E. Lee as unambiguously heroic to try to push him right out of his saddle. But a debunking approach didn't seem right to Mark Zwonitzer, whose new American Experience documentary on the Civil War figure broadcasts on PBS on Monday.
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SPORTS
June 30, 1990
The other day, I overheard an 8-year-old boy say he wanted to be the next Jose Canseco, so he could make $20 million and drive a fancy sports car. And I immediately thought back to when I was a boy and how I, too, dreamed of becoming a major leaguer. The next Gil Hodges, I used to say. However, my love for Gil had nothing to do with his salary or his possessions. I loved him . I remember watching the games with my mother, and it was Gil's tradition that after he hit a homer, as he rounded third base he would blow a kiss to his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010
It just doesn't give him a rush Let's see if I'm clear on what the letter-writer is saying in his response to Neil Gabler's piece on TV's new wave of one-hour dramas ["Feedback," April 11]: Those of us who don't watch "Breaking Bad" aren't "equipped, by temperament or experience, to want to see a more credible reflection of the world as it is" rather than as we'd like it to be? Gosh, really?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | LEE MARGULIES, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
America loves a hero, and it evidently has one in Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. His appearance on "20/20" last Friday sent the show's ratings soaring, figures from the A.C. Nielsen Co. showed Tuesday. The ABC magazine ranked third among the week's 86 prime-time programs and was seen in about 17.1 million homes--nearly 50% more than it has been averaging this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1986 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Times Staff Writer
When the producers of tonight's "George Burns 90th Birthday Special" (8 p.m., Channels 2 and 8) needed assistance locating vintage footage of the comedian, they turned to a seemingly unlikely source--a 26-year-old. However, Robert Weide is hardly representative of his age group. While his peers grew up idolizing rock stars or sports figures, Weide worshiped comedians who were in their prime before he was even born.
SPORTS
July 12, 2009 | Jeff Jacobs, Jacobs is a columnist for the Hartford Courant.
Diana Taurasi walked off the basketball court and was making her way through the gauntlet known as the Olympic mixed zone when she stopped for a couple of familiar faces. This was last August in Beijing, and Taurasi wore a big smile and an even bigger medal. She hugged one guy with a media credential and turned toward me. I balked. Not because I wasn't happy for her. I was. And it certainly wasn't because I don't like Taurasi. Her joy of basketball and competition is irresistible. No, I balked out of respect for the professional distance between a journalist and his subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when the most intriguing art freshly interprets unlikely aspects of pop culture, it makes perfect sense that an art museum would look at the Southern California subculture of hot rodders and car customizers in the context of the art it influenced. The trouble with "Kustom Kulture: Von Dutch, Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, Robert Williams and Others," at the Laguna Art Museum through Nov. 7, is that the show comes off as genial boosterism rather than cultural analysis.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I'm glad Nolan Ryan is retiring this year after 27 seasons because, frankly, I need to get on with my life. Childhood heroes are not supposed to stalk us into our mid-30s but, alas, there is Ryan, the ageless wonder, who insists on holding hostage the last link to my adolescence. By all rights, we should have cut this cord at least 10 years ago when Ryan was throwing 95 and pushing 36.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Rev. Herbert Daughtry stood in the pulpit of the yellow brick House of the Lord Pentecostal Church in Brooklyn as parishioners fanned themselves against the heat with cardboard fans decorated with the dove of peace. "This is a momentous time in history," the minister announced. "If you live on Mars, you would have heard Nelson and Winnie Mandela will be in town this week."
SPORTS
July 12, 2009 | Jeff Jacobs, Jacobs is a columnist for the Hartford Courant.
Diana Taurasi walked off the basketball court and was making her way through the gauntlet known as the Olympic mixed zone when she stopped for a couple of familiar faces. This was last August in Beijing, and Taurasi wore a big smile and an even bigger medal. She hugged one guy with a media credential and turned toward me. I balked. Not because I wasn't happy for her. I was. And it certainly wasn't because I don't like Taurasi. Her joy of basketball and competition is irresistible. No, I balked out of respect for the professional distance between a journalist and his subject.
SPORTS
November 19, 2008 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Jacob Clay knew there was something special in the cereal aisle at Vons, so he dropped his daddy's hand and scooted along in search of his treat. He turned a corner and smiled at a face he knew. "Look. Michael Phelps," he said, pointing to the Corn Flakes display. Jacob's father, Olympic decathlon champion Bryan Clay, laughed before leading his bright-eyed 3-year-old son farther down the aisle.
OPINION
April 4, 2008
You'd better not kill anybody after 6:01 p.m. today, or you'll really rile the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. It has passed a resolution declaring a 40-hour moratorium on violence, starting at a time that marks to the minute the 40th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. That the anniversary of King's shocking murder attracts this kind of silliness is no great surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
THIS is shaping up to be network television's year of magical thinking. As the parade of fall premieres bangs by in the coming weeks, viewers can't help but notice how many prime-time lead characters have acquired supernatural powers. A single touch from the hero of ABC's "Pushing Daisies" can raise the dead, but another tap, and it's a one-way ticket back to the undiscovered country.
SPORTS
August 19, 2007 | T.J. SIMERS
So I spent much of Saturday putting together a "these people live among you" column, becoming more and more depressed by the minute before going in a completely different direction. I had gone to Las Vegas, asked Kobe Bryant a series of questions about the questions that he had raised about his future with the Lakers and was now reading e-mail from people who were really ticked off because I was bothering their hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | KINNEY LITTLEFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Self-Help Graphics' vibrant inks have left a lasting imprint. For 28 years, the acclaimed nonprofit arts center has been a mecca of fine printmaking in East Los Angeles, a nexus of Chicano pride and artistic endeavor. It will share its wealth with the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in Santa Ana, when the high-energy exhibition "Inspiring Heroes" opens July 7.
SPORTS
March 17, 2006 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Mark Saina's first trip to the United States proved profitable. The Kenyan earned $110,000 and a new car last year when he won the Los Angeles Marathon. Afterward, Saina said he would use his winnings to help his family and others near his farm in Kenya. "We have so many people that are less fortunate," he said at the time. "I feel happy that I will be able to help in that way." Saina, a maize and wheat farmer, realized a dream by building a church with part of the prize money.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
"EVERYONE'S Hero" is an unusual film in many ways. It manages to be rated G without the aid of talking animals or singing princesses. Neither does it rely on multilayered sarcasm, pop culture references, camp or the ability of a lead character to channel Ed McMahon, Julia Child and/or Elvis.
SPORTS
March 17, 2006 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Mark Saina's first trip to the United States proved profitable. The Kenyan earned $110,000 and a new car last year when he won the Los Angeles Marathon. Afterward, Saina said he would use his winnings to help his family and others near his farm in Kenya. "We have so many people that are less fortunate," he said at the time. "I feel happy that I will be able to help in that way." Saina, a maize and wheat farmer, realized a dream by building a church with part of the prize money.
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