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Herodotus

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NEWS
February 14, 1991
How can "Black Athena" be controversial? Don't we believe in evolution of cultures? The similarities of Athenian Greece to the old Semitic and Egyptian civilizations is obvious. Herodotus thought Grecian civilization arose from Egypt, and he should know. JAMES R. STONE Fresno
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OPINION
March 4, 2009
Re "Iranian official demands apology from visiting Hollywood group," March 2 Iran's protest of a visit from Hollywood producers and actors and its distress over the film "300," which depicts the battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, should call our attention to Herodotus, the Greek chronicler of the Persian Wars. Herodotus wrote that he studied history "so that human achievements may not be forgotten in time, and great and marvelous deeds -- some displayed by Greeks, some by barbarians -- may not be without their glory; and especially to show why two peoples fought each other."
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TRAVEL
March 8, 1992
Donald Carroll does an excellent job trying to sell Turkey in The Times' Travel cover story on Feb. 23, and in his book, "Insider's Guide to Turkey." The selling tries to alter the bad image the Turks have enjoyed for years, for many good reasons. He should be aware of the many U.N. resolutions against the Turkish government for their invasion of Cyprus in 1974 and for violating human rights in the occupied territories. Worst of all, several facts of history have been stated in a very vague way. Reading the article, one gets the impression that Herodotus, the father of history, was a Turk.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2008 | Tim Rutten
Retracing the steps of some epic journey has become one of contemporary travel writing's creaky conceits. Alexis de Tocqueville's great "Democracy in America" by now has provided the narrative armature for a small library of books exploring our national character and social arrangements. Paul Theroux, who decisively altered the character of modern travel writing by elevating the author's inner geography to equal status with his destinations, even has begun to recapitulate his own journeys.
OPINION
March 4, 2009
Re "Iranian official demands apology from visiting Hollywood group," March 2 Iran's protest of a visit from Hollywood producers and actors and its distress over the film "300," which depicts the battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, should call our attention to Herodotus, the Greek chronicler of the Persian Wars. Herodotus wrote that he studied history "so that human achievements may not be forgotten in time, and great and marvelous deeds -- some displayed by Greeks, some by barbarians -- may not be without their glory; and especially to show why two peoples fought each other."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1992
The article on "reality programming" and the confusion that ensues from mixing fact with fiction was quite interesting. One outstanding error in the article serves both to support and undermine the authors' reporting. One of the experts so concerned with the public becoming confused was herself confused. "MASH" was not about the Vietnam War (except by analogy). It all took place in Korea. What is critical here is that an expert is confused, and not by a subtle distortion. "MASH" made no effort to mislead the public or to hide the fact that it took place in Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2008 | Tim Rutten
Retracing the steps of some epic journey has become one of contemporary travel writing's creaky conceits. Alexis de Tocqueville's great "Democracy in America" by now has provided the narrative armature for a small library of books exploring our national character and social arrangements. Paul Theroux, who decisively altered the character of modern travel writing by elevating the author's inner geography to equal status with his destinations, even has begun to recapitulate his own journeys.
BOOKS
June 10, 2007 | Ben Ehrenreich, Ben Ehrenreich is the author of the novel "The Suitors."
"THERE is nothing worse than finding yourself alone in somebody else's country during somebody else's war," commented Ryszard Kapuscinski in his 1991 book "The Soccer War" while describing a terrifying crawl through the jungle front line of a now largely forgotten 1969 conflict between El Salvador and Honduras. Yet Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist who died earlier this year at 74, found himself in similar straits again and again over four decades and on as many continents.
BOOKS
June 14, 1998 | PETER GREEN, Peter Green is the author of "Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age" and is visiting professor of history at the University of Iowa
In a very real sense, history as we know it begins with Herodotus. His predecessors--shadowy figures such as Hecataeus of Miletus, Hellanicus of Lesbos or Charon of Lampsacus--traveled widely and inquisitively, picked up oral traditions, retailed great-man anecdotes and genealogies but never combined their inquiries (historiai in Greek) into one great Enquiry, the critical, discursive What and Why of the past.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Genetic studies of Italians in Tuscany show that their forefathers, the ancient Etruscans, moved to Italy from what is now Turkey -- an origin that many archeologists have dismissed as unlikely. The Etruscans, who emerged about 1200 BC, reached their zenith in the 6th century BC, dominating Italy and the Mediterranean area until being assimilated into the Roman Republic about 200 BC. They provided many of the cultural underpinnings of Roman society.
BOOKS
June 10, 2007 | Ben Ehrenreich, Ben Ehrenreich is the author of the novel "The Suitors."
"THERE is nothing worse than finding yourself alone in somebody else's country during somebody else's war," commented Ryszard Kapuscinski in his 1991 book "The Soccer War" while describing a terrifying crawl through the jungle front line of a now largely forgotten 1969 conflict between El Salvador and Honduras. Yet Kapuscinski, the Polish journalist who died earlier this year at 74, found himself in similar straits again and again over four decades and on as many continents.
BOOKS
June 14, 1998 | PETER GREEN, Peter Green is the author of "Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age" and is visiting professor of history at the University of Iowa
In a very real sense, history as we know it begins with Herodotus. His predecessors--shadowy figures such as Hecataeus of Miletus, Hellanicus of Lesbos or Charon of Lampsacus--traveled widely and inquisitively, picked up oral traditions, retailed great-man anecdotes and genealogies but never combined their inquiries (historiai in Greek) into one great Enquiry, the critical, discursive What and Why of the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1992
The article on "reality programming" and the confusion that ensues from mixing fact with fiction was quite interesting. One outstanding error in the article serves both to support and undermine the authors' reporting. One of the experts so concerned with the public becoming confused was herself confused. "MASH" was not about the Vietnam War (except by analogy). It all took place in Korea. What is critical here is that an expert is confused, and not by a subtle distortion. "MASH" made no effort to mislead the public or to hide the fact that it took place in Korea.
TRAVEL
March 8, 1992
Donald Carroll does an excellent job trying to sell Turkey in The Times' Travel cover story on Feb. 23, and in his book, "Insider's Guide to Turkey." The selling tries to alter the bad image the Turks have enjoyed for years, for many good reasons. He should be aware of the many U.N. resolutions against the Turkish government for their invasion of Cyprus in 1974 and for violating human rights in the occupied territories. Worst of all, several facts of history have been stated in a very vague way. Reading the article, one gets the impression that Herodotus, the father of history, was a Turk.
NEWS
February 14, 1991
How can "Black Athena" be controversial? Don't we believe in evolution of cultures? The similarities of Athenian Greece to the old Semitic and Egyptian civilizations is obvious. Herodotus thought Grecian civilization arose from Egypt, and he should know. JAMES R. STONE Fresno
BOOKS
March 29, 1998 | DAVID RAINS WALLACE, David Rains Wallace is author of several books about Latin American natural history and conservation, including "The Monkey's Bridge: Mysteries of Evolution in Central America" (Sierra Club Books)
Savages have fascinated civilization at least since Herodotus. The Rousseauian idea that they are freer and happier than civilized people has played a part in this fascination, but that idea probably isn't fundamental to it. The civilized have despised the uncivilized, on the whole, and they still do despite modern cultural relativism. (The poor box-office returns from the 1992 film of Peter Matthiessen's Amazon novel, "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," perhaps reflect this.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989
Mr. Stanford should read the writings of the great historians Herodotus the Greek and Tacitus the Roman, who kept alive the true identities of the ancient Egyptians. They were there and had seen that the ancient Egyptians, which includes Cleopatra, were black and not white as Mr. Stanford has so wrongly stated. BRENDA MURRAY Los Angeles
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