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Herzog Contracting Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1988
The Los Angeles City Council's three black members on Tuesday called for a city investigation and hearings into allegations of racial discrimination by a major contractor on the publicly funded Los Angeles-to-Long Beach trolley project.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1988
The Los Angeles City Council's three black members on Tuesday called for a city investigation and hearings into allegations of racial discrimination by a major contractor on the publicly funded Los Angeles-to-Long Beach trolley project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County Transportation Commission investigation of a major contractor on its $700-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach light-rail project has found no evidence of alleged discriminatory actions against minorities, officials said Friday. However, officials said the investigation was less than exhaustive and that further inquiries into charges of racial bias may follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Jackie Washington, a stocky, black rail hand, was a convincing figure as he came to the defense of his embattled employer before the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission. It was last February, and Herzog Contracting Corp., one of the major builders of the $750-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach trolley, had been accused of discrimination by several black former employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
An alleged "pattern of discrimination" against black and Latino workers by one of the largest contractors on the $700-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach light-rail project is being investigated by the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission. The Missouri-based Herzog Contracting Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Jackie Washington, a stocky, black rail hand, was a convincing figure as he came to the defense of his embattled employer before the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission. It was last February, and Herzog Contracting Corp., one of the major builders of the $750-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach trolley, had been accused of discrimination by several black former employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1987
Construction on a 4.5-mile eastward extension of the San Diego trolley is scheduled to begin by early March, Rick Thorpe, director of engineering and construction for the Metropolitan Transit Development Board, said Friday. The $20-million job will extend the East Line from its present terminus at Euclid Avenue in Southeast San Diego to Spring Street in La Mesa. Herzog Contracting Corp. of St. Joseph, Mo.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
Port officials awarded two multimillion-dollar contracts at a recent board meeting of harbor commissioners. Herzog Contracting Corp. of Missouri won a $7.2-million contract to realign Terminal Way and raise the street over the railway. The 15-month project scheduled to begin April 1 is expected to create 119 direct and spin-off jobs. California contractor L. B. Foster Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1986
The sixth San Diego County grand jury to review a controversial 1981 county landfill contract recommended Thursday that the county improve its contracting process. The 1985-86 jury examined the most recent complaint surrounding the landfill contract awarded to Herzog Contracting Corp. of Missouri. The citizen's complaint questioned the process by which the contract was awarded and the amount of money the county allegedly lost by including resource recovery options in the contract.
NEWS
February 26, 1987
Over the sharp objections of several local black and women business owners, the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission awarded its largest rail construction contract so far to a firm that was not the original lowest bidder. The commission, on a 7-4 vote, awarded the $43-million contract to build the middle section of the 21-mile Long Beach-to-downtown Los Angeles light rail line to Missouri-based Herzog Contracting Corp., which originally was the second-lowest bidder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County Transportation Commission investigation of a major contractor on its $700-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach light-rail project has found no evidence of alleged discriminatory actions against minorities, officials said Friday. However, officials said the investigation was less than exhaustive and that further inquiries into charges of racial bias may follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
An alleged "pattern of discrimination" against black and Latino workers by one of the largest contractors on the $700-million Los Angeles-to-Long Beach light-rail project is being investigated by the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission. The Missouri-based Herzog Contracting Corp.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Some officials from the area around Kaiser Steel's proposed solid waste dump said Monday that they have no objections to the possibility of a landfill at the abandoned Eagle Mountain iron ore mine in Riverside County. Ailing Kaiser Steel formally announced Monday that it will undertake a feasibility study of whether Eagle Mountain, located half way between the desert cities of Indio and Blythe, can be used as a regional center for the management and disposal of non-hazardous waste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Sections of a new $40.6-million bridge near Oceanside that will serve one of the busiest rail corridors in the nation are being torn out and rebuilt due to flaws in the concrete. Officials for the San Diego Assn. of Governments, which is funding the project, said the contractors are replacing about 500 feet of the 755-foot span over the Santa Margarita River and a nearby tidal marsh. David Hicks, an association spokesman, said the work will cost about $3 million and delay the opening of the bridge by about a year.
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