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Heterosexual Men

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NEWS
September 10, 1992 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Evelyn Hooker, seated in her sunny Santa Monica apartment, describes herself as "hopelessly heterosexual." But she is also perhaps the most celebrated person in gay rights history. A new documentary called "Changing Our Minds: The Story of Dr. Evelyn Hooker," directed by Richard Schmiechen and produced by David Haugland, details her life's work. In a 1957 report, Hooker challenged then-prevailing beliefs about homosexuality.
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NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Men in same-sex marriages are living longer, according to Danish researchers, but mortality rates among married lesbians have begun to rise after a long period of decline. The study, published Tuesday in the International Journal of Epidemiology, used Denmark's civil registry to follow 6.5 million adults from 1982 to 2011. The study is the first of its kind to examine mortality -- the risk of death during a specific period of time -- and relationship status for an entire nation. "Our study expands on century-old knowledge that married people generally have lower mortality than unmarried and divorced persons," wrote the lead author, Dr. Morten Frisch, a professor of epidemiology at Aalborg University.
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SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | Monte Morin
A Canadian study on anxiety and sexual orientation suggests that heterosexual men suffer more depression and higher levels of stress than gay and bisexual men. The study, published Monday in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, involved 87 men and women in Montreal, and sought to determine whether gays, lesbians and bisexuals experienced reduced stress and anxiety after "coming out of the closet. " Study subjects were asked to fill out diagnostic questionnaires for depression, anxiety and burnout.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2005 | From Newsday
There are odors that drive a person's sexual response, and scientists have found that homosexual men differ from heterosexual men in the way they respond to such smells. Their brain activity more closely resembles the responses observed in women, new research has shown.
SCIENCE
June 17, 2008 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The brains of gay men resemble those of straight women, according to research published today that provides more evidence of the role of biology in sexual orientation. Using brain-scanning equipment, researchers said they discovered similarities in the brain circuits that deal with language, perhaps explaining why homosexual men tend to outperform straight men on verbal skills tests -- as do heterosexual women.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | Monte Morin
A Canadian study on anxiety and sexual orientation suggests that heterosexual men suffer more depression and higher levels of stress than gay and bisexual men. The study, published Monday in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, involved 87 men and women in Montreal, and sought to determine whether gays, lesbians and bisexuals experienced reduced stress and anxiety after "coming out of the closet. " Study subjects were asked to fill out diagnostic questionnaires for depression, anxiety and burnout.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Men in same-sex marriages are living longer, according to Danish researchers, but mortality rates among married lesbians have begun to rise after a long period of decline. The study, published Tuesday in the International Journal of Epidemiology, used Denmark's civil registry to follow 6.5 million adults from 1982 to 2011. The study is the first of its kind to examine mortality -- the risk of death during a specific period of time -- and relationship status for an entire nation. "Our study expands on century-old knowledge that married people generally have lower mortality than unmarried and divorced persons," wrote the lead author, Dr. Morten Frisch, a professor of epidemiology at Aalborg University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1993
In response to "Sissy Warriors vs. Real Men," Commentary, Jan. 29: Richard Rodriguez hit the nail right on the head. I am an attorney specializing in lesbian/gay rights. The overwhelming majority of military discharge cases involve lesbians, both statistically and in our law office. Yet, all of the controversy on gays in the military has been focused on gay men. One of the roots of homophobia is machismo and its collision with male/male sexuality. Lesbian love scenes are often portrayed beautifully in movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1989
Dannemeyer's letter only serves to further illustrate his homophobia and ignorant prejudice of homosexuals. Homosexuality is not a "choice" anymore than is heterosexuality. Homosexual men and women cannot be equated to chemically dependent or criminally inclined people. Homosexuality is not a symptom of a disease nor is it a perversion in any clinical sense. Homosexual men and women are not out to make converts or to advance the decline of Western civilization. Homosexuality is not an "adverse" life style or one that denies the validity of any other human sexual expression.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Earlier this summer, scientists at Northwestern University found that bisexual men exist.   Duh! Or would that be: Duh? As the Los Angeles Times reported in this recent examination of "duh science," some research seems so painfully obvious it makes you wonder why scientists even bothered to go through with it.  (In this case, even one of the Northwestern scientists admitted to the New York Times that the research might make...
HEALTH
September 15, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
In the pursuit of happily-ever-after, the odds seem to be stacked against us. Men and women reap huge benefits when they stick around with a good partner -- staying happier and healthier, living longer and passing along more genes. But the sticking-around part is a challenge. We don't get long-term relationship payoffs right away. And until then -- between the once-upon-a-time and the happily-ever-after -- plenty of temptations can beckon. Not that it's wrong to shop around before settling down.
SCIENCE
June 17, 2008 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The brains of gay men resemble those of straight women, according to research published today that provides more evidence of the role of biology in sexual orientation. Using brain-scanning equipment, researchers said they discovered similarities in the brain circuits that deal with language, perhaps explaining why homosexual men tend to outperform straight men on verbal skills tests -- as do heterosexual women.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2005 | From Newsday
There are odors that drive a person's sexual response, and scientists have found that homosexual men differ from heterosexual men in the way they respond to such smells. Their brain activity more closely resembles the responses observed in women, new research has shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1999
Whether Jeff Chandler was a cross-dresser or not is nobody's business ("Esther Williams Is All Wet, Say Friends of the Late Jeff Chandler," by Glenn Lovell, Oct. 27). Who cares? What is shocking is that Esther Williams has come up with the trashiest book of the decade. And, I might add, the most boring. Her apparent infatuation with male genitalia is mind-boggling. And her incessant whining about the way men treat her is a yawn. (And why did she put up with it?) I struggled through the book and tossed it. I'm sure she's making a fortune off it, which is the point.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER
When Tribe 8's singer Lynn Breedlove revved up a chain saw before her band's show at Spaceland on Friday, the audience knew they were in for something different. That was just the beginning. During the show, Breedlove removed her shirt to reveal nipple rings and an anarchy symbol scrawled across her belly. Then she displayed a dildo. "What do you think this is, 'Geraldo' or 'Oprah'?" she asked. Hardly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1997 | DAVID LINK, David Link is an attorney and writer who lives in Sacramento. He is author of several essays included in "Beyond Queer: Challenging Gay Left Orthodoxy" (Free Press)
Should gay men embrace stereotypes about themselves? According to some gay writers and activists, the answer is yes. The new movie "In & Out," ("Chance Remark Fuels Satirical 'In & Out,' " Calendar, Sept. 19) embraces what might appear to be fairly benign stereotypes about homosexuality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1997
A provocative study claims many men belong to predominantly feminist, goddess-worshiping witches' covens because they like shedding the image of a take-charge male and because they also enjoy "more spiritual" sex with women they meet in them. "Witches believe that sex is natural, good--and in certain cases, holy," said KellieRymes of Northridge, a USC student who will describe her research today at a meeting in San Diego of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1997 | DAVID LINK, David Link is an attorney and writer who lives in Sacramento. He is author of several essays included in "Beyond Queer: Challenging Gay Left Orthodoxy" (Free Press)
Should gay men embrace stereotypes about themselves? According to some gay writers and activists, the answer is yes. The new movie "In & Out," ("Chance Remark Fuels Satirical 'In & Out,' " Calendar, Sept. 19) embraces what might appear to be fairly benign stereotypes about homosexuality.
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