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BUSINESS
September 7, 2001 | Reuters
Hewlett-Packard Co., which earlier this week made a bid for Compaq Computer Corp., said it would pay as much as $882 million in stock and cash to buy industrial printing systems firm Indigo. HP already had a minority stake in Indigo, which makes high-speed color print technology, an area HP expects will take off in the commercial printing market. The deal would add to HP's earnings per share in the first full year of operation, HP said. HP said it owned about 13.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2001 | Reuters
Hewlett-Packard Co., which earlier this week made a bid for Compaq Computer Corp., said it would pay as much as $882 million in stock and cash to buy industrial printing systems firm Indigo. HP already had a minority stake in Indigo, which makes high-speed color print technology, an area HP expects will take off in the commercial printing market. The deal would add to HP's earnings per share in the first full year of operation, HP said. HP said it owned about 13.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | Reuters
Converge Inc., an online marketplace founded by Hewlett-Packard Inc. and 14 other technology companies, said it would buy NECX, an electronic components trading exchange owned by VerticalNet Inc. The acquisition is expected to help Converge expand the reach of its online marketplace and further knock down inefficiencies that cost high-tech companies billions each year. Under the terms of the sale, Horsham, Pa.-based VerticalNet will receive $60 million in cash, a 19.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1987
Compounding Technology Inc., a Corona-based subsidiary of CIMCO, said it has signed a long-term contract with the Palo Alto branch of Hewlett-Packard Inc. to provide a number of enhanced plastic materials for its computer products. A company spokeswoman said the specific terms of the contract, effective immediately, could not be disclosed. However, she placed the value at between $2 million and $5 million per year and said it currently is scheduled to run less than 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Nobuhiko Ushiba, a former Japanese ambassador to the United States, died of a liver ailment at a Tokyo hospital Monday. He was 75. Ushiba became director of the Foreign Ministry's Economic Affairs Bureau in 1959, and was appointed ambassador to Canada two years later. He served in Ottawa until 1964. He was a deputy vice minister for foreign affairs and administrative vice minister for foreign affairs before being assigned to Washington in 1970.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge reluctantly granted Apple Computer a reprieve Tuesday in its $5.5-billion copyright lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Inc., agreeing to reconsider an earlier ruling that many observers said had all but destroyed Apple's case. Apple alleges in the 4-year-old lawsuit that Microsoft's popular Windows software and a related H-P program are illegally derived from the Apple Macintosh.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apple Computer's 5-year-old lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Inc. headed for an appeals court Tuesday as a U.S. District Court judge threw out all of Apple's remaining claims in the closely watched case. The suit alleges that Microsoft's Windows software and H-P's New Wave program are rip-offs of the Apple Macintosh. An Apple victory could radically alter the course of the personal computer industry.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning finish to a legendary career, Digital Equipment Corp. founder Kenneth H. Olsen announced his retirement Thursday, leaving the computer giant as it attempts to climb out of a deep slump. He recommended that Robert B. Palmer, Digital's vice president of manufacturing, succeed him as president, effective October 1. Olsen's unexpected announcement came on the same day that John A. Young, president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Inc., announced his retirement.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The $9.6-billion Packard Foundation reached beyond the world of philanthropy for a new president and chief executive Tuesday, naming Richard T. Schlosberg III, the former publisher and chief executive of the Los Angeles Times, to the post. Schlosberg, 54, joins the Bay Area foundation at a critical time in its history. In 1996, it vaulted to the top echelon of philanthropic organizations with a $5-billion bequest of stock from the estate of technology pioneer David Packard.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hewlett-Packard Co. said Friday that it had agreed to pay $141 million to settle patent disputes with software maker Intergraph Corp. Hewlett-Packard said it expected the settlement to reduce earnings for the first quarter of fiscal 2005 by about 3 cents a share. It will pay Huntsville, Ala.-based Intergraph by Friday. Hewlett-Packard shares fell 3 cents to $19.99 on the New York Stock Exchange. Intergraph shares rose 46 cents to $28 on Nasdaq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1985
President Reagan's appointment on Monday of David Packard, former deputy secretary of defense, to head a search for ways to clean up the scandal-ridden military-procurement system is a sign that he means business. Packard knows the Pentagon. As co-founder and chairman of Hewlett-Packard Inc., one of California's most successful companies, he knows industry.
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