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Hibernation

SPORTS
February 14, 2006 | Chris Foster
The Turin Olympic Games were scripted as a marquee event for the NHL. The sport's finest players competing on the world's grandest sports stage. The only swearing in to be done was the Olympic oath. That feel-good-about-the-game scenario lost a little shine after New Jersey authorities announced arrests in a nationwide gambling operation allegedly run by Phoenix Coyote assistant coach Rick Tocchet and New Jersey state trooper James Harney.
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SPORTS
January 20, 2006 | JIM PELTZ
Motor racing's absence over the winter can seem interminable for fans, but the wait is nearly over. NASCAR stock-car racing's premier event, the Daytona 500, is Feb. 19 and will be followed a week later by the Auto Club 500 at the California Speedway in Fontana on Feb. 26. NHRA drag racing opens with the Carquest Auto Parts Winternationals at Pomona on Feb. 9-12.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mice forced to breathe hydrogen sulfide -- best known for its rotten egg smell -- go into a kind of suspended animation, U.S. researchers said Thursday. The finding may help save human lives. Although hydrogen sulfide gas is toxic in high doses, it may activate some of the mechanisms that cause some animals to go into hibernation, the researchers wrote in this week's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
The wave of remakes continues. The 1967-69 TV series "Gentle Ben," about a lovable bear and his human "family," is the basis for a new TV movie of the same title, starring Dean Cain. It'll air in March on--where else?--Animal Planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jerry Harrison, keyboardist and guitarist for Talking Heads, says the band is "officially in hibernation," but no one is resting. Harrison, 41, said he had hoped Talking Heads would put out an album this year, but "I didn't get my way." "We're not through as a band, but we're not doing anything this year," he said in the Aug. 6 issue of People magazine. The band's last album, "Naked," was released in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1993 | DON HECKMAN
Kenny Loggins' Universal Amphitheatre performance Saturday was a celebration of '60s revivalism. Although much of the material of the superb two-hour set was actually released in subsequent decades, the spirit and the energy of '60s and '70s middle-of-the-road pop permeated the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Context is everything. Back in 1995, the Toadies were an intense, if inessential, rock act with lyrics of dangerous sexual obsession and a sound blissfully derivative of Nirvana and the Pixies. The band's "Rubberneck" album was a bestseller, but the Toadies went years without a follow-up collection. That was then. In 2001, the Toadies deliver the new "Hell Below/Stars Above," and it's a welcome blast of energy and angst in an era of teen pop and too many ham-fisted metal-rap bands.
SPORTS
January 20, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Super Bowl-bound Chicago Bears took Sunday off before leaving for the New Orleans Superdome, a place that holds mixed memories for the NFC champions. The Bears, coming off three days of practice inside Memorial Stadium's bubble in Champaign, will leave for New Orleans today to prepare for the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX. The game will mark the Bears' fourth at the Superdome, home of the New Orleans Saints. Two of the games were regular-season contests, one an exhibition.
SPORTS
November 16, 1986 | ED GOLDEN, Associated Press
With the World Series crowds gone, the housekeepers of Fenway Park have turned their attention from sweeping up the mounds of paper cups, popcorn containers and ice cream wrappers to preparing for winter. From taking the screen off The Wall in left field to replacing sod destroyed by the postseason media crush, groundskeeper Joe Mooney and his crew are readying the old ballyard for another cold New England season.
OPINION
April 2, 1989 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev is a RAND Corp. specialist in Soviet affairs
Last week's voting for a new Soviet Parliament--the first contested elections since November, 1918--was a staggering blow to the Soviet Communist Party and its claim to be the legitimate representative of the Soviet people. Swept to defeat by huge margins were a large number of top party officials, KGB functionaries and high-ranking military commanders. In some regions, such as the Baltic republics, rejection of party candidates assumed wholesale proportions.
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