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Hidden Hills Ca Elections

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers for seats on the Hidden Hills City Council said they would try to increase sheriff's patrols and emergency preparations if elected next Tuesday in the upscale, bucolic town of about 500 homes. Near the end of a sleepy political race for three council seats, businessmen Stuart Siegel and Monty Fisher said they would change little about the tiny city's policies except to expand, where possible, security and preparations for any disaster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | SYLVIA OLIANDE and DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If all politics are truly local, then the only elections in the San Fernando Valley on Tuesday were the real stuff. Voters in the cities of San Fernando, Calabasas and Hidden Hills chose city council members. In addition, in San Fernando the city treasurer post was on the ballot. And for the first time in 20 years, it was a contest with more than one candidate.
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NEWS
April 11, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democracy burst out all over Los Angeles County on Tuesday, as voters in 57 cities decided a multitude of civic issues stemming from the continuing influx of immigrants to the region and the frenetic pace of urban growth. Mostly, voters in the patchwork of municipalities that make up suburban Los Angeles opted for change as they chose city council members and considered ballot initiatives in decidely low-key elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Voters in three local cities will go to the polls today to fill seats on city councils and, in San Fernando, to elect a city treasurer. Polling places for Calabasas, Hidden Hills and San Fernando will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters who are unsure of their polling place in Calabasas may call (818) 878-4225; in Hidden Hills, (818) 888-9281; and in San Fernando, (818) 898-1204. Candidates for three seats on the Calabasas City Council are James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Voters in three local cities will go to the polls today to fill seats on city councils and, in San Fernando, to elect a city treasurer. Polling places for Calabasas, Hidden Hills and San Fernando will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters who are unsure of their polling place in Calabasas may call (818) 878-4225; in Hidden Hills, (818) 888-9281; and in San Fernando, (818) 898-1204. Candidates for three seats on the Calabasas City Council are James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask someone in Hidden Hills when the last City Council election was held, and you may get a blank stare. The year was 1984. Two elections scheduled since then were canceled because of a lack of candidates. But on April 10, voters in the gated, tree-nestled city of 2,000 in the western San Fernando Valley go to the polls in what could be among the most hotly contested races in Hidden Hills history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | SYLVIA OLIANDE and DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If all politics are truly local, then the only elections in the San Fernando Valley on Tuesday were the real stuff. Voters in the cities of San Fernando, Calabasas and Hidden Hills chose city council members. In addition, in San Fernando the city treasurer post was on the ballot. And for the first time in 20 years, it was a contest with more than one candidate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994
Key to Election Tables -- An asterisk (*) denotes an incumbent candidate. -- Elected candidates and approved measures--or those leading with 99% of precincts reporting--are in bold type. Results are not official and could be affected by absentee ballots. -- Party affiliation is indicated in parentheses: (D) Democratic (R) Republican -- 0% indicates returns were unavailable at edition time or only absentee ballots have been counted. -- Uncontested races are not included in the tables.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name a politician who scoffs at press coverage, ignores reporters, doesn't return telephone calls--all just one week before a big election--and chances are they live in Hidden Hills. In fact, all five City Council candidates for this Tuesday's election in the eccentric, aggressively smug gated and guarded city in the west San Fernando Valley are a bit press shy. And who can blame them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In a city where the homeowners association has power almost equal to the City Council's, three candidates for two spots on the legislative body are running a relatively low-key race. But the candidates in Tuesday's election said the issues the City Council faces are similar to those of their larger neighbors: preventing crime, balancing the budget and holding the reins on development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In a city where the homeowners association has power almost equal to the City Council's, three candidates for two spots on the legislative body are running a relatively low-key race. But the candidates in Tuesday's election said the issues the City Council faces are similar to those of their larger neighbors: preventing crime, balancing the budget and holding the reins on development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994
Key to Election Tables -- An asterisk (*) denotes an incumbent candidate. -- Elected candidates and approved measures--or those leading with 99% of precincts reporting--are in bold type. Results are not official and could be affected by absentee ballots. -- Party affiliation is indicated in parentheses: (D) Democratic (R) Republican -- 0% indicates returns were unavailable at edition time or only absentee ballots have been counted. -- Uncontested races are not included in the tables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers and one incumbent were elected to the Hidden Hills City Council this week, after the mayor of the college campus-sized town asked residents at the last minute not to vote for him. "Please don't vote for me!" screamed the headline of a letter sent Monday by Mayor David G. Stanley to residents of the city, which has about 550 homes.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name a politician who scoffs at press coverage, ignores reporters, doesn't return telephone calls--all just one week before a big election--and chances are they live in Hidden Hills. In fact, all five City Council candidates for this Tuesday's election in the eccentric, aggressively smug gated and guarded city in the west San Fernando Valley are a bit press shy. And who can blame them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers for seats on the Hidden Hills City Council said they would try to increase sheriff's patrols and emergency preparations if elected next Tuesday in the upscale, bucolic town of about 500 homes. Near the end of a sleepy political race for three council seats, businessmen Stuart Siegel and Monty Fisher said they would change little about the tiny city's policies except to expand, where possible, security and preparations for any disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Personal loans from candidates to their own campaign committees were the prime method of fund raising for municipal races in the San Fernando, Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys, according to finance statements filed by candidates. The campaign statements, filed Friday, cover fund-raising activity from Jan. 1 to Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Personal loans from candidates to their own campaign committees were the prime method of fund raising for municipal races in the San Fernando, Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys, according to finance statements filed by candidates. The campaign statements, filed Friday, cover fund-raising activity from Jan. 1 to Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers and one incumbent were elected to the Hidden Hills City Council this week, after the mayor of the college campus-sized town asked residents at the last minute not to vote for him. "Please don't vote for me!" screamed the headline of a letter sent Monday by Mayor David G. Stanley to residents of the city, which has about 550 homes.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democracy burst out all over Los Angeles County on Tuesday, as voters in 57 cities decided a multitude of civic issues stemming from the continuing influx of immigrants to the region and the frenetic pace of urban growth. Mostly, voters in the patchwork of municipalities that make up suburban Los Angeles opted for change as they chose city council members and considered ballot initiatives in decidely low-key elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask someone in Hidden Hills when the last City Council election was held, and you may get a blank stare. The year was 1984. Two elections scheduled since then were canceled because of a lack of candidates. But on April 10, voters in the gated, tree-nestled city of 2,000 in the western San Fernando Valley go to the polls in what could be among the most hotly contested races in Hidden Hills history.
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