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Hidden Hills City Council

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1987
The Hidden Hills City Council has set May 4 as the date it will appoint someone to fill a vacancy on the five-member body. The city is already taking applications for the council seat held by former Mayor Alana Knaster, officials said Wednesday. Knaster's move to a neighboring community made her resignation necessary. The mayor of the community is chosen from among the five council members by majority vote.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
In the March 4 Hidden Hills City Council election, voters will have a choice of four candidates -- three incumbents and one political newcomer -- for three open seats on the five-member panel that governs the 2,000-resident equestrian enclave in the far west San Fernando Valley. All four candidates vow to work to keep things pretty much the same in the tony, gated city that has a per capita income among the highest in the state. Incumbent Stuart E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers and one incumbent were elected to the Hidden Hills City Council this week, after the mayor of the college campus-sized town asked residents at the last minute not to vote for him. "Please don't vote for me!" screamed the headline of a letter sent Monday by Mayor David G. Stanley to residents of the city, which has about 550 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | SYLVIA OLIANDE and DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If all politics are truly local, then the only elections in the San Fernando Valley on Tuesday were the real stuff. Voters in the cities of San Fernando, Calabasas and Hidden Hills chose city council members. In addition, in San Fernando the city treasurer post was on the ballot. And for the first time in 20 years, it was a contest with more than one candidate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
In the March 4 Hidden Hills City Council election, voters will have a choice of four candidates -- three incumbents and one political newcomer -- for three open seats on the five-member panel that governs the 2,000-resident equestrian enclave in the far west San Fernando Valley. All four candidates vow to work to keep things pretty much the same in the tony, gated city that has a per capita income among the highest in the state. Incumbent Stuart E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1990
The builder behind a controversial development proposal that would have brought lower-cost housing to wealthy Hidden Hills said Monday that the project is dead. Danny Howard of H.H. Lasher Road Ltd. said his option to buy the 25-acre property has expired because the Hidden Hills City Council has not made a final decision on the entire project. Howard said his contract with landowners Jon Galiher and William Maingot required him to obtain final council approval by early May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers for seats on the Hidden Hills City Council said they would try to increase sheriff's patrols and emergency preparations if elected next Tuesday in the upscale, bucolic town of about 500 homes. Near the end of a sleepy political race for three council seats, businessmen Stuart Siegel and Monty Fisher said they would change little about the tiny city's policies except to expand, where possible, security and preparations for any disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990
The developer of a proposed affordable housing development in Hidden Hills has offered to hold the property for a year to give city officials time to resolve a controversy over the project. Danny Howard made the offer Monday night at a meeting of the Hidden Hills City Council. He also said he would consider selling the 2 1/2-acre parcel to the city for $1.2 million. Howard's entire project would encompass 25 acres, with nine luxury houses built on 20 acres inside the town's gates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993
Signaling a new and less-trusting attitude among residents of the gated Hidden Hills community, the City Council is considering mandatory horse licensing in an attempt to reduce illegal boarding and the number of lawsuits against the city. The discussion comes partly as the result of a lawsuit against Hidden Hills by a woman who alleges she was bucked from a horse spooked by machinery on city land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hidden Hills City Council is investigating whether it can satisfy legal demands for affordable housing by building a senior citizens residential project but keeping it outside the boundaries of the wealthy, gated city. Council members asked the town's attorney Monday night to find out whether keeping the 46-unit senior citizens' project outside the city boundaries would satisfy a court settlement agreed to by the city in May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In a city where the homeowners association has power almost equal to the City Council's, three candidates for two spots on the legislative body are running a relatively low-key race. But the candidates in Tuesday's election said the issues the City Council faces are similar to those of their larger neighbors: preventing crime, balancing the budget and holding the reins on development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers and one incumbent were elected to the Hidden Hills City Council this week, after the mayor of the college campus-sized town asked residents at the last minute not to vote for him. "Please don't vote for me!" screamed the headline of a letter sent Monday by Mayor David G. Stanley to residents of the city, which has about 550 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Two challengers for seats on the Hidden Hills City Council said they would try to increase sheriff's patrols and emergency preparations if elected next Tuesday in the upscale, bucolic town of about 500 homes. Near the end of a sleepy political race for three council seats, businessmen Stuart Siegel and Monty Fisher said they would change little about the tiny city's policies except to expand, where possible, security and preparations for any disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993
Signaling a new and less-trusting attitude among residents of the gated Hidden Hills community, the City Council is considering mandatory horse licensing in an attempt to reduce illegal boarding and the number of lawsuits against the city. The discussion comes partly as the result of a lawsuit against Hidden Hills by a woman who alleges she was bucked from a horse spooked by machinery on city land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1990
The builder behind a controversial development proposal that would have brought lower-cost housing to wealthy Hidden Hills said Monday that the project is dead. Danny Howard of H.H. Lasher Road Ltd. said his option to buy the 25-acre property has expired because the Hidden Hills City Council has not made a final decision on the entire project. Howard said his contract with landowners Jon Galiher and William Maingot required him to obtain final council approval by early May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he was reluctant to involve himself in the details of running the city government of Hidden Hills, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge Thursday declined to order the wealthy city to build a controversial development that would include lower-cost housing. But Judge R. William Schoettler, Jr. said his ruling should not deter the proposed project's developer from pursuing a lawsuit that the judge said could "potentially" cost the city $1 million or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
The Hidden Hills City Council outlined a plan Monday to poll its residents early next year about a proposal to build a low-cost housing project for senior citizens on the edge of the gated community. The city is considering a proposal to build 46 units of affordable housing for senior citizens outside the town's two gates on a small portion of 25 acres the city would annex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hidden Hills City Council, taken over this week by members opposed to a proposed development that includes lower-cost housing, moved to fire the city's attorney on the eve of a key court battle, but the attorney vows not to leave quietly. City Atty. Wayne K. Lemieux's support for the development put him at odds with three council members who took office Tuesday night after winning election by campaigning against the project.
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