Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHigh Definition Television
IN THE NEWS

High Definition Television

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
The competition to develop high-definition television revved up on Thursday with the announcement that the U.S. divisions of two European electronics giants have joined NBC-TV to research advanced TV systems. Philips Consumer Electronics Co. said it will join an existing research venture of Thomson Consumer Electronics Inc. and NBC. Philips is part of NV Philips of the Netherlands, while Thomson is the U.S. division of Thomson SA of France.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 2, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Prices on big-screen TVs will be going down in time for holiday shopping this year, but don't expect the dramatic discounts of 2009 when they fell 20%. This year, according to research firm DisplaySearch, prices for high-definition televisions will drop about 8%, which means you'll be able to pick up a 32-inch LCD model for an average price of about $360 and a 55-inch set for an average of about $1,675. U.S retailers can't blame the soft discounting on booming business. There's a surplus of unsold TVs nationwide because so many households already have high-definition televisions.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 16, 1990 | From Reuters
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., the world's largest consumer electronics firm, announced Thursday that it won the race to market the world's first high-definition television. The Osaka-based company, which sells TVs under the Panasonic name, said its 36-inch HDTV would cost 4.5 million yen ($34,900) and go on sale in Japan next month. "Realistically, we can't expect to sell very many. You could buy a luxury car for the same money," a spokesman said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Alex Pham
Grab the popcorn and 3-D glasses and get ready for the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the trade event that got its start as a gadget-fest but has emerged as an important showcase for new entertainment technology. In years past, the show has been the glitzy platform from which manufacturers launched such products as high-definition television, the digital video recorder, the compact disc player and the camcorder. This year will be no different. On display Thursday through Sunday will be four technology trends that promise to shape how people get their entertainment.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hewlett-Packard said Monday that it has signed an agreement to build encoders to broadcast high-definition television signals for AT&T and Zenith Electronics Corp. "We intend to be in the digital video business," said James Olson, general manager of the H-P division that would build the encoders. "That would be a new market for H-P," he said. The encoders would compress television signals and convert them into digital computer language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1990
Your editorial (Nov. 18) on high-definition television misses the point. It is high-definition programs that we need. ROBERT SHACKFORD, South Laguna
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1987 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
At a local department store here this week, consumers got their first glimpse of a new technology that may one day give them the same quality pictures on their TV sets they now see at movie theaters. The demonstrations on three large-screen televisions, which included excerpts from the movie "Top Gun," frequently were followed by two questions from those who watched: "How much is it?" and "Where can I buy it?"
BUSINESS
August 2, 1989 | From Reuters
High-definition television, touted as the next wave in electronics, might not be a big enough breakthrough to restore competitiveness to the American industry, the Congressional Budget Office said in a report released Tuesday. The findings triggered immediate criticism from an industry trade group and congressmen who support increased federal funding to develop the new technology.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1992
TVN Entertainment Corp., a Burbank-based pay-per-view satellite television channel, has announced plans to build a high-definition television studio in conjunction with REBO Group Inc., a production company from New York. The two companies plan to build a production center for high-definition projects at TVN's existing satellite facility in Burbank.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT
The high-definition TV process with which CBS' "The Littlest Victim" was taped last year probably will become commonplace in the next decade, says the CBS engineering executive involved in the taping. The principal reason, said Joseph Flaherty, is the savings in time that translates to lower costs in making a program: "It's one of few things we can do to help (fight) escalating production costs."
BUSINESS
July 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Sony, Samsung and other consumer-electronics heavyweights are uniting to support a technology that could send high-definition video signals wirelessly from a single set-top box to screens around the home. The consortium announced Wednesday is an important development in the race to create the definitive way to replace tangles of video cables, but doesn't end it -- Sony and Samsung also support a competing technology. In the new consortium, Sony Corp. and Samsung Electronics Co.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Almost 14% of U.S. television households have a high-definition TV, with Los Angeles and New York showing the greatest use, Nielsen Co. said. More than 11% of TV homes are getting at least one HD station, Nielsen said. Los Angeles has the highest penetration of HDTVs at 20%, while New York has the most receiving at least one HD channel at 18%, Nielsen said.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2007 | From Reuters
Digital video recorder maker TiVo Inc. on Wednesday posted a loss that reflected an inventory write-off made necessary by the rapid shift by retailers to sell newer, high-definition recorders. TiVo shares fell more than 4% after hours. Its net loss for its fiscal second quarter ended July 31 was $17.7 million, or 18 cents a share, compared with the year-earlier quarter's loss of $6.4 million, or 7 cents. The latest quarter's loss included an inventory write-down charge of $11.2 million.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Remember when buying a television was easy? You just settled on what size you wanted and chose a cabinet in black, silver or the look of real wood. Now you have a plethora of choices, including technologies such as LCD, plasma and DLP rear projection. And you're shopping with the knowledge that whichever type you pick, it will get more advanced technologically and less taxing financially if you just wait a little longer.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2006 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
As it rolls out the first high-definition DVD player, Toshiba Corp. is boasting: "Image is everything." After testing the so-called HD DVD machine on three TVs of various dimensions, I hit on a more appropriate slogan: Size matters. Last week, a milestone in viewing was reached with the debut of the Toshiba HD-A1, which costs just shy of $500. (A deluxe model, the HD-XA1, goes for $800). Should you care? Probably not.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2005 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Hagai Gefen spent thousands of dollars on a home entertainment system, but it wasn't picture perfect. So he called in Joe Kane, who tunes television pictures the way piano tuners find the perfect pitch of A. Kane and a growing breed of technicians like him rely on their highly trained eyes to coax crisper pictures, richer colors and finer details out of the high-tech television sets anchoring more and more living rooms.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-stakes technology competition aimed at choosing a design for a national high-definition television system, originally scheduled to begin next week, has been delayed until July. The delay stems primarily from the eleventh-hour decision by most of the competitors to base their systems on the digital language of computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
ABC hopes to make ratings magic with a night of television built around the network debut of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" -- and a sneak peek at the third Warner Bros. film in the franchise. The 2001 movie, starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint, will air on May 9 in an extended, high-definition version that includes previously unseen footage, the network said.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2003 | May Wong, Associated Press
They have no receptionist and only paper name signs taped to their office doors, but the 20 employees working out of a nondescript building on a leafy, quiet street here are ready to challenge tech giants in the digital media market. Led by the man who helped spark a revolution in television by creating ReplayTV, the first digital video recorder, the start-up Roku is developing products to make the living room, and not the PC, the showcase for all digital content, from photos to music.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|