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High Frequency Trading

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BUSINESS
September 23, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Just ahead of a reworking of rules governing stock markets, Securities and Exchange Commission Chairwoman Mary L. Schapiro made it clear how she feels about high-speed computerized trading, secretive dark-pool networks and other regimens that make trades nearly invisible to ordinary investors. "High-frequency-trading firms are subject to very little in the way of obligations," she said in a speech delivered at a conference of stock and bond traders, "either to protect stability by promoting reasonable price continuity in tough times, or to refrain from exacerbating price volatility.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Timothy M. Phelps
If you're not investigating high-speed stock trading, you're missing one of the hottest trends on Wall Street. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is examining high-frequency trading for possible violations of antitrust and insider-trading laws. When Justice Department investigators visit companies, they may bump into their compatriots from other state and federal agencies. The FBI disclosed this week that it is in the middle of a months-long probe.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is investigating the practice of high-speed trading on the stock exchanges. Holder, in testimony prepared for delivery before the House Appropriations Committee, said the Justice Department is investigating the use of computer algorithms and ultra-high-speed data networks to execute trades as a possible violation of antitrust laws. Firms that use such tactics, employing physicists and other scientists to predict changes in the markets sometimes only seconds in advance, have been around for more than three decades.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
A computer programmer accused of stealing software from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. faces up to 15 years in prison after being convicted on two federal criminal counts. A U.S. District Court jury in Manhattan found Sergei Aleynikov, 40, guilty Friday on one count of economic espionage and one count of transporting stolen goods across state lines. He is set to be sentenced in March. Aleynikov, who worked on Goldman's high-frequency-trading desk, was arrested a month after he quit the investment bank last year to work for a Chicago start-up, Teza Technologies, which was trying to build its own trading operation.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is investigating the practice of high-speed trading on the stock exchanges. Holder, in testimony prepared for delivery before the House Appropriations Committee, said the Justice Department is investigating the use of computer algorithms and ultra-high-speed data networks to execute trades as a possible violation of antitrust laws. Firms that use such tactics, employing physicists and other scientists to predict changes in the markets sometimes only seconds in advance, have been around for more than three decades.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
The cramped computer room in an office building overlooking the Harbor Freeway can't match the color and tradition of the New York Stock Exchange. No traders, opening bell or operatic din. Just floor-to-ceiling racks of Dell and Hewlett-Packard computers spitting out a monotonous drone. The only people passing through are janitors and the occasional programmer or electrician. But while the NYSE remains the cynosure of the global markets, much of the world's stock trading emanates from drab computer rooms such as this one in downtown Los Angeles, or in outposts such as Kansas City, Mo., or Jersey City, N.J. These are the epicenters of high-frequency trading, a breed of lightning-fast computerized trading that dominates today's stock market, but which critics say carries risks for investors and for the market itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET The Chris Matthews Show Bob Woodward, the Washington Post; Andrea Mitchell; David Brooks, the New York Times; Katty Kay, BBC. (N) 5:30 a.m. KNBC SUNDAY Today The significance of 10-10-10. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union With Candy Crowley Midterm elections: Democratic Congressional Campaign Chairman Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.); Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Ca.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - Ari Rubenstein, a "Star Trek" fan who counts physics as a hobby, wants to boldly go where Wall Street has never gone before: the speed of light. Rubenstein heads Strike Technologies, a New York company that's part of a budding cottage industry racing to build networks of ultra-fast microwave radio transmitters linking the world's financial hubs. It could be the final frontier in the financial industry's tech arms race as the fastest traders scramble to get even faster, and as regulators mull over ways to prevent technology breakdowns on Wall Street.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Timothy M. Phelps
If you're not investigating high-speed stock trading, you're missing one of the hottest trends on Wall Street. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is examining high-frequency trading for possible violations of antitrust and insider-trading laws. When Justice Department investigators visit companies, they may bump into their compatriots from other state and federal agencies. The FBI disclosed this week that it is in the middle of a months-long probe.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - Ari Rubenstein, a "Star Trek" fan who counts physics as a hobby, wants to boldly go where Wall Street has never gone before: the speed of light. Rubenstein heads Strike Technologies, a New York company that's part of a budding cottage industry racing to build networks of ultra-fast microwave radio transmitters linking the world's financial hubs. It could be the final frontier in the financial industry's tech arms race as the fastest traders scramble to get even faster, and as regulators mull over ways to prevent technology breakdowns on Wall Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011
TODAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show 2012 presidential election: Bob Woodward, the Washington Post; John Heilemann, New York magazine; Helene Cooper, the New York Times; Alex Wagner, Huffington Post. (N) 4 p.m. KNBC and 11 a.m. Sunday KNBC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET Today (N) 4 a.m. KNBC SUNDAY Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union With Candy Crowley Economy and jobs; housing market; budget: Austan Goolsbee, president Economic Advisory Board.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
A computer programmer accused of stealing software from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. faces up to 15 years in prison after being convicted on two federal criminal counts. A U.S. District Court jury in Manhattan found Sergei Aleynikov, 40, guilty Friday on one count of economic espionage and one count of transporting stolen goods across state lines. He is set to be sentenced in March. Aleynikov, who worked on Goldman's high-frequency-trading desk, was arrested a month after he quit the investment bank last year to work for a Chicago start-up, Teza Technologies, which was trying to build its own trading operation.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Just ahead of a reworking of rules governing stock markets, Securities and Exchange Commission Chairwoman Mary L. Schapiro made it clear how she feels about high-speed computerized trading, secretive dark-pool networks and other regimens that make trades nearly invisible to ordinary investors. "High-frequency-trading firms are subject to very little in the way of obligations," she said in a speech delivered at a conference of stock and bond traders, "either to protect stability by promoting reasonable price continuity in tough times, or to refrain from exacerbating price volatility.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal regulators still haven't been able to pinpoint the cause of Wall Street's so-called flash crash a month ago, but more than two dozen experts Wednesday told the Securities and Exchange Commission what might work to prevent a repeat — and what won't work. SEC Chairwoman Mary L. Schapiro said the agency was "making progress" in its ongoing review of the market turmoil of May 6, when the Dow Jones industrial average plummeted 700 points in just 15 minutes. Schapiro last month proposed changes to stem future nose dives, most notably a temporary plan for a circuit-breaker mechanism that would halt trading for five minutes in all shares of companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index should any single stock price change at least 10% during a five-minute period.
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