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November 27, 1994 | Bernard Cooper, Los Angeles writer Bernard Cooper is a frequent contributer to Harper's. His last two books are "Maps to Anywhere," from the University of Georgia Press, and "A Year in Rhymes" published by Viking
I loved the restaurant's name, a compact curve of a word. Its sign, five big letters rimmed in neon, hovered above the roof. I almost never saw the sign with its neon lit; my parents took me there for early summer dinners, and even by the time we left--father cleaning his teeth with a toothpick, mother carrying steak bones in a doggie-bag--the sky was still bright. Heat rippled off the cars parked along Hollywood Boulevard, the asphalt gummy from hours of sun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
METAIRIE, La. - The strippers were gyrating and the smoke machine was spewing its vaporous mist, but Matthew McConaughey just kept on staring straight ahead. Gaunt and mustachioed, the actor called for another shot of Johnnie Walker - if he meant a prop liquid, the bartender didn't seem to know it - and tightened his facial muscles almost to the breaking point. "Man, if you're up there, you better be listening," McConaughey whispered, candles from the table in front of him flickering shadows on his contorted face as he half-beseeched, half-ordered the heavens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1999
Re "Caught Flat-Footed and Liking It," editorial, Nov. 24: I suspect the prevalence of low-heeled shoes owes more to an aging population than it does to good sense. As a woman of a certain age, I have discovered that my feet, and sometimes even my back, protest the graceful matchstick heels that once danced all night in perfect comfort. Oh, that there were silicone injections for the soles of one's feet. Even so, I could still be tempted by a beautiful shoe, but the manufacturers have condemned us to combat boots and clunky heels.
OPINION
July 21, 2013 | Amy Goldman Koss, Amy Goldman Koss' latest novel for teens is "The Not-So-Great Depression."
Every few years, as she is reviled by yet another crop of new parents casting about for a scapegoat for their daughters' troubling body issues, I feel called on to defend my childhood pal Barbie. "I know," they say, "let's blame the 7-inch-tall plastic girl!" As if she is any more responsible for the way she looks than humans are. Of one thing I am certain: It is the parents, not the kids, who take Barbie so harshly to task. The children know that no matter what she looks like, Barbie is a great friend, always game, and utterly trustworthy with secrets.
HEALTH
May 4, 2009 | Kathleen Clary Miller
Whenever I heard the phrase "broken ankle," I assumed the subsequent events: cast, crutches, cast off, bit of limp, back to normal. I never considered the possibility that the ankle supports the full weight of the body. In short, the anklebone is not only connected, it had better be well-connected. Eight weeks after "the incident" that had two dogs in the doghouse around my house, I celebrated the day of "boot removal." My husband treated me to a romantic dinner and a bottle of Cabernet.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Repeated exposure to objects like high-heeled shoes and electric razors that are typically associated with one gender or the other biases people's perceptions of whether human faces are male or female, according to a new study. And in a twist, the research shows that exposure to female-associated objects makes faces look more male, and vice versa. It may seem strange that viewing something for an extended period of time can lead to increased perception of its opposite, but the effect is common enough to have a name: adaptation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
The physician was wearing high heels, a tight-fitting white lab coat and lots of gold jewelry, which is not quite what you expect to see when you visit a pot doctor. Nor do you expect to see a chandelier the size of a Christmas tree in a waiting room decorated like an Indian palace. Dr. Sona Patel told me that's just who she is. Her Melrose Avenue office, she said, is designed in much the same way as her home in Hollywood. You may be wondering what I'm doing in the office of yet another cannabis specialist, given my fruitful encounter last month with a physician in Glendale.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
If there’s one thing to be learned from "Sex and the City," it’s that women love high heels. Sure, they might be painful to wear and challenging to walk in (for some of us, anyway), but as the saying goes, beauty is pain . But blisters might not be the only downside to wearing high heels. In fact, the damage might be occurring higher up on the body – in the ankle, knee and hip, according to new research   being presented later this month at the annual meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Valley stores are full of dresses that gleam and sparkle like Christmas ornaments and shoes that are either gorgeous or the work of the devil, depending on your tolerance for pain. We're talking here about shoes with toe cleavage and heels high and narrow enough to induce fantasies of making a full confession so you can take them off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the time, finding fashionable work clothes is no problem for Karen Teeter. She simply wears what everyone around her is wearing: jeans, heavy shoes and a hard hat. But Saturday, Teeter, a Somis resident who works as a building inspector for Los Angeles County, got a chance to show a different side of herself.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
It came down to a high-heel shoe caught in a grate. Stephen J. Murphy, president of the Boston City Council, took time Saturday to reflect on all that has happened in his city this week, beginning with the Boston Marathon bombings. He told the Los Angeles Times he hasn't been able to shake the feeling that something as small as a stuck high heel kept him out of harm's way at the finish line of the race on Monday. But that's what happened. PHOTOS: Manhunt for bombing suspects He and his group were crossing a footbridge to get to the north side of Boylston Street near the finish line, where they would meet up with more friends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
A fundraiser being hosted by Los Angeles County sheriff's officials Thursday night ended in violence, with one guest arrested and more arrests possible, a department spokesman confirmed. Sheriff's deputies were hosting a party at Cities, a bar and restaurant in East Los Angeles, to raise money for an annual law enforcement relay race. About 2 a.m. Friday, there was an altercation that involved off-duty deputies and guests. One woman invited to the party was arrested on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon on a police officer.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
Famed fashion and accessories designer Marc Jacobs has added Diet Coke cans to his design repertoire. Jacobs, who was recenlty appointed creative director at Coca Cola, is launching a set of limited-edition cans of Diet Coke to celebrate Coke's 30th anniversary campaign: "Sparkling Together for 30 Years. " Each can represents a decade with the '80s, '90s and the Noughties. For the '80s, miniature bow ties are scattered around the classic silver can along with an illustraton of a woman in a suit and top hat. Possibly a nod to Broadway?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2012 | By Irene Lacher
Alabama-born Walton Goggins is best known for playing corrupt cop Shane Vendrell on "The Shield" and born-again ex-con Boyd Crowder on "Justified," which earned him an Emmy nomination; the crime drama returns for its fourth season Jan. 8. But Goggins also dispelled any preconceptions about his limits as an actor this year with divergent roles in the films "Django Unchained" and "Lincoln" as well as a recent guest spot on "Sons of Anarchy. " Did you get acting whiplash playing these wildly different roles, from crazed killer to transgender hooker?
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
Since the NBA season officially gets underway the day before All Hallows Eve, perhaps it's fitting that one of the National Basketball Assn.'s latest licensing deals is for women's Halloween costumes. Described by the NBA as "dance team costumes" (as opposed to, say, "sexy team groupie costumes," or "sexy cheerleader uniforms"), the collection includes body-hugging, leg-baring riffs on the uniforms of five teams: the Boston Celtics, Dallas Mavericks, Miami Heat, New York Knicks and Los Angeles Lakers.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Repeated exposure to objects like high-heeled shoes and electric razors that are typically associated with one gender or the other biases people's perceptions of whether human faces are male or female, according to a new study. And in a twist, the research shows that exposure to female-associated objects makes faces look more male, and vice versa. It may seem strange that viewing something for an extended period of time can lead to increased perception of its opposite, but the effect is common enough to have a name: adaptation.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anyone meeting Marie Brenner last year would think she had the perfect turn-of-the-century sophisticate's life. As writer-at-large for Vanity Fair magazine, she had a flourishing, sexy career crafting serious and important articles like the one about dirty deeds in the tobacco industry that inspired the Oscar-nominated movie "The Insider." She thought of her second marriage, to venture capitalist Ernie Pomerantz, as uncommonly lucky and stable.
NEWS
October 18, 1985 | Associated Press
A Chinese shoe-industry conference has set maximum heights for high heels, a fashion rage among youth in the world's most populous country. The English-language newspaper China Daily said participants at the conference, held in the Inner Mongolia region, set limits of 2 1/2 inches for women's heels and 1 1/2 inches for men's heels. Quoting a report in the Inner Mongolia Daily, it said the action was taken "out of consideration for health."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
Running through a battle environment killing teens while a global audience watches in glee doesn't (one hopes) have much in common with the world we live in. But Jennifer Lawrence -- who of course plays Katniss Everdeen in said environment's “Hunger Games” -- thinks the film's sequel will offer a certain verisimilitude. “The new movie will be very real, which is what I'm excited about,” she told 24 Frames of “Catching Fire,” which Francis Lawrence will direct. “I really like his take, which is a lot of what I liked in Gary Ross,” she added.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Angry Buddhist A Novel Seth Greenland Europa Editions: 400 pp., $16 paper Seth Greenland's "The Angry Buddhist" begins with two sexy American women getting matching tattoos in Puerto Vallarta - and then it swiftly jumps forward into the madcap final week of a congressional race out in the desert around Palm Springs. The incumbent, a wily and infinitely pragmatic political sleazebag named Randall Duke, finds himself facing a new kind of problem, namely, an opponent who might actually defeat him. Her name is Mary Swain, and here she is, observed at a rally by the angry Buddhist of the title, one of Randall's brothers, the busted cop called Jimmy Ray Duke: "She glides to the microphone and Jimmy notes the burnished skin, the blinding smile, the five hundred dollars' worth of blond highlights, fitted red blouse set off against the matching white linen skin and jacket that wraps her like cellophane.
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