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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER, Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino
In the transportation world, it is politically correct to jump on the diamond lane bandwagon, in the name of reduced traffic and better air. Caltrans plans to add these so-called high-occupancy vehicle lanes to virtually every freeway in the region. The reality is, however, that the California Department of Transportation has unwittingly found the best way to increase traffic congestion on the freeways, make air quality worse and encourage urban sprawl. A critical look at HOV lanes shows that they achieve the opposite of their intended purpose.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2009 | Roger Vincent
As the regional economy continues to sputter, vacancy rates are beginning to climb at warehouses and distribution centers for industrial goods, putting the already hard-hit Inland Empire at further risk of decline and threatening facilities in Los Angeles and Orange counties as well. After years of high occupancy and rapid construction of cargo hubs, immense spaces are now standing empty.
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OPINION
April 18, 2004
Re "Hybrids in Carpool Lanes: a Nonstarter," Commentary, April 14: How can Robert Poole be so sure the carpool lanes will be clogged with hybrids? There are very few in the state. The carpool lanes are far from crowded, as any commuter will tell you. Why not give it a trial and see what happens? Or is that too simple? Poole is concerned that there will be a plethora of hybrids. Just think, if most of us drove them we'd have clean air, lower fuel prices and OPEC would feel our wrath.
AUTOS
December 1, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
In the never-ending world of one-upmanship between Northern and Southern California, it seems the Bay Area is the undisputed winner in one category: carpool lanes. The California Department of Transportation created a carpool system for Southern California that is vastly different from the setup in Northern California and different from the systems used for many urban freeways nationwide.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 2004
The story "7 Ways in Search of a Will" (by Hugo Martin, Aug. 29) called for building new roads and freeways, adding lanes to existing freeways, expanding effective transit services, etc. All of these suggestions will do little to ease the traffic glut in our major metropolitan areas. Each suggestion also involves huge funds from sources that are already bankrupt. There is an eighth way that can be implemented in a few days, and it will cost nothing. The plan is based on a feasible and equitable system of restricting driving on alternate days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1992
Your Feb. 4 editorial "Car-Pool Cowboys" left the impression that Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol are unconcerned about excessive speed on high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) freeway lanes. Let me assure you, and your readers, that both Caltrans and the CHP are very concerned when motorists exceed the legal speed limit of 55 miles per hour. Caltrans has the responsibility of administering California freeways--and to that end--we plan, design and build the system with one goal in mind: It must be the safest structure we are capable of creating while incorporating the latest technology for the benefit of commuters.
OPINION
December 1, 1996
Re "Model City or Monumental Mistake?" Nov. 24: The Newhall Ranch project will result in additional trips up and down I-5, which is already over capacity. As a "mitigation" for this, the project proposes high-occupancy vehicle lanes for I-5, yet these lanes exist only in the developer's imagination. Sell that to those who are already commuting up and down I-5. Many of the measures proposed to mitigate traffic problems created by the development rely on the long-range plan of the MTA. Unfortunately for everyone in the greater Los Angeles region, including the developers, the long-range plan of the MTA simply can't be relied on. The development's marketers claim that it is "transit friendly," but almost nothing real exists to justify the claim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1988
After reading William Trombley's article "The High Road," (Metro, Aug. 14), as a concerned and experienced engineer I would like to offer an interesting, new idea to the double-decking of our freeway. We all agree that improving the capacity of our already overloaded freeways is vital to the survival of our region. We Californians love the freedom that our automobiles provide, and neither the "convenience" of the RTD nor the speed offered by the diamond lanes can tempt us out of our own cars.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1985 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Despite at least $15 million in losses from "debt financing" problems, the Hotel Inter-Continental, San Diego's sleek 681-room luxury waterfront hotel, is expected to end its first calender year of operation in December with an unusually high occupancy rate of 75%, hotel officials said Thursday. Officials blamed the loss on the heavy debt involved in financing the $92-million hotel, adjacent $11-million hotel conference center and other facilities. Although Sandor J.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Beset by high debt costs, the Hotel Inter-Continental San Diego lost $1.2 million over the first four months of 1987, despite a healthy 82% occupancy rate that was significantly above the local market average. For all of 1986, the hotel lost $7.6 million while operating at a 69% occupancy rate.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 2004
The story "7 Ways in Search of a Will" (by Hugo Martin, Aug. 29) called for building new roads and freeways, adding lanes to existing freeways, expanding effective transit services, etc. All of these suggestions will do little to ease the traffic glut in our major metropolitan areas. Each suggestion also involves huge funds from sources that are already bankrupt. There is an eighth way that can be implemented in a few days, and it will cost nothing. The plan is based on a feasible and equitable system of restricting driving on alternate days.
OPINION
April 18, 2004
Re "Hybrids in Carpool Lanes: a Nonstarter," Commentary, April 14: How can Robert Poole be so sure the carpool lanes will be clogged with hybrids? There are very few in the state. The carpool lanes are far from crowded, as any commuter will tell you. Why not give it a trial and see what happens? Or is that too simple? Poole is concerned that there will be a plethora of hybrids. Just think, if most of us drove them we'd have clean air, lower fuel prices and OPEC would feel our wrath.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1999 | MORRIS NEWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The opening of two new oceanfront hotels, together with the purchase of the former Miramar Sheraton last month, has turned the warm sands of the Santa Monica beachfront into a very hot market for luxury hotels. With no more hotel construction allowed along the city's coastal area, room rates and occupancy levels are both likely to remain high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the relatively few who can use them, the looming ramps connecting carpool lanes to carpool lanes may seem like a slice of driving heaven: congestion-free travel virtually guaranteed at some of the busiest interchanges in the country. The price of admission? Finding at least one passenger to ride along with you, something survey after survey has shown few people are inclined to do.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball fans, news media and assorted hangers-on attending the World Series here starting today will pay 55% more for lodging than they would have five years ago. They're hitting town at the wrong turn in the hotel development cycle. No major downtown hotels have been built here since the 875-room Hyatt Regency opened in December 1992. High occupancy rates (averaging 80%) and tight supply have sent room rates up 13% from a year ago and up 55% since mid-1993.
OPINION
December 1, 1996
Re "Model City or Monumental Mistake?" Nov. 24: The Newhall Ranch project will result in additional trips up and down I-5, which is already over capacity. As a "mitigation" for this, the project proposes high-occupancy vehicle lanes for I-5, yet these lanes exist only in the developer's imagination. Sell that to those who are already commuting up and down I-5. Many of the measures proposed to mitigate traffic problems created by the development rely on the long-range plan of the MTA. Unfortunately for everyone in the greater Los Angeles region, including the developers, the long-range plan of the MTA simply can't be relied on. The development's marketers claim that it is "transit friendly," but almost nothing real exists to justify the claim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1988 | JULIO MORAN, Times Staff Writer
Fueled by high occupancy rates and an upsurge in office space development, hotel construction is booming in the Westside. In Santa Monica, where a change in political climate is allowing construction of beachfront hotels for the first time, at least six new hotels are planned or under construction. Developers are hoping to make the city into an "urban resort" area for both weekend getaways and weeklong convention groups. In Century City, a new luxury hotel opened in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER, Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino
In the transportation world, it is politically correct to jump on the diamond lane bandwagon, in the name of reduced traffic and better air. Caltrans plans to add these so-called high-occupancy vehicle lanes to virtually every freeway in the region. The reality is, however, that the California Department of Transportation has unwittingly found the best way to increase traffic congestion on the freeways, make air quality worse and encourage urban sprawl. A critical look at HOV lanes shows that they achieve the opposite of their intended purpose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1992
Your Feb. 4 editorial "Car-Pool Cowboys" left the impression that Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol are unconcerned about excessive speed on high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) freeway lanes. Let me assure you, and your readers, that both Caltrans and the CHP are very concerned when motorists exceed the legal speed limit of 55 miles per hour. Caltrans has the responsibility of administering California freeways--and to that end--we plan, design and build the system with one goal in mind: It must be the safest structure we are capable of creating while incorporating the latest technology for the benefit of commuters.
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