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NATIONAL
October 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The fire that killed six people in a 35-story government office building in Chicago may have been started by malfunctioning light fixtures, investigators said. An electrical engineer was hired to test the fixtures, wires and switches in the 12th floor storage room where the fire began. The results may not be available for up to two weeks, said Tom Ahern, spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
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NATIONAL
October 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
A fire in a high-rise county administration building Friday killed six people and trapped workers in smoke-filled stairways and hallways, officials said. The dead were among 13 people overcome by smoke who were not found until firefighters conducted a floor-by-floor search of the 35-story building in the downtown Loop district after the fire was brought under control. Some of those trapped had called 911 on their cellular phones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
City planners are seeking construction of a skyscraper that could be as high as the 853-foot TransAmerica Pyramid, the city's highest building. The idea is part of an ambitious plan to redevelop the city's Transbay Terminal. To help finance a new terminal, the city would allow developers to build at least six residential towers south of the Financial District. The plan stipulates that a tower more than 800 feet high could be built next to the terminal if it passes analysis.
WORLD
February 14, 2003 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Much of the planet might be wary of skyscrapers after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, but ambitious Shanghai is charging ahead with plans to construct the world's tallest building. At 101 stories and 1,624 feet tall, the Shanghai World Financial Center would be another symbol of a metropolis whose can-do spirit and robust growth stand in contrast to jittery economies and worries about war elsewhere.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
Because of the collapse of the World Trade Center towers, fire chiefs around the world will be less likely to send firefighters to the upper floors of burning skyscrapers, the former fire commissioner of New York City said Saturday. Otherwise, strategies for battling such fires are unlikely to change much after the terrorist attacks on the twin towers, said Thomas Van Essen, who retired in January.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Donald Trump scrapped his plan to build the world's tallest building after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, opting instead for a 78-story skyscraper on Chicago's riverfront. The 1,073-foot glass-covered building, called Trump Tower Chicago, would be the city's fourth-tallest skyscraper. The New York real estate tycoon said in July he was considering building the world's tallest building on the site now occupied by the Chicago Sun-Times building.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | DENIS D. GRAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For centuries the gilt spire of the Sule Pagoda soared over Yangon's roofs and palm tops, unchallenged on the skyline of a city rich in colonial architecture and exotic Asian atmosphere. Then, foreign developers perpetrated what residents say is comparable to planting a high-rise next to Paris' Notre Dame Cathedral. Twin 20-story towers were illegally erected some 100 yards from the pagoda, located at the geographic heart of the capital.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious workers returned to their Southern California offices Wednesday, but many acknowledged that little was being accomplished as the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington proved to be an overwhelming distraction. "Everyone showed up for work, but people are either surfing the Internet for the latest news or watching the television," said Bruce Forman, 30, co-chief executive of Romp, a Santa Monica film production company with 22 employees. "It's perfectly understandable.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
A judge declared a mistrial Thursday after jurors reported they were deadlocked in the civil trial against the Chicago Housing Authority by the family of a 5-year-old boy who was dropped to his death from a high-rise. "And so the case is over," Circuit Judge James S. Quinlan Jr. said after the jurors, who deliberated for five days, told him they could not reach a decision. Two boys, ages 10 and 11, dropped Eric Morse from a 14th-floor window in a high-rise within the Ida B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | ELISE GEE and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a climate of desperation among Internet companies, Giovanni Lemm may have climbed to new heights. Determined to promote his new Web site, Lemm tied up downtown traffic and public safety resources for three hours Tuesday morning as he climbed 26 stories up the side of a high-rise while trailing a banner with his Web address. Lemm, 32, a rock climber, began his journey up the Wells Fargo building at 333 S. Grand Ave. about 3 a.m. Fire and police personnel responded shortly after 6:15 a.m.
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