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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Perris -- The competition was high-performance and high-risk, and Sean Carey and his 16 fellow skydivers knew it. They were equipped with special parachutes that allowed a faster and better-controlled descent, and their goal Saturday was to dive toward a shallow pond in an advanced maneuver known as swooping. One by one, they plummeted toward the surface, executing a last-minute turn to accelerate before leveling off and gliding just above the pond. But Carey, an instructor at Skydive San Diego who had done the maneuver successfully hundreds of times, made his turn too low and crashed into the pond.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
California is bracing for what officials fear could be an unprecedented winter fire season fueled by record dry conditions that show no signs of letting up. January is typically a time when forest fire camps and air bases are closed and seasonal firefighters go home. But not this year. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has responded to 150 wildfires so far. During the same period last January, there were none, and the historic average is 25. Fire officials pointed to coastal blazes in Humboldt and San Mateo counties in the last two weeks as examples of the conditions they're facing.
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WORLD
January 7, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Flames continued to lick Monday at the Australian island of Tasmania, while officials warned that other stretches of the country faced some of the most dangerous conditions for fires on record. “I cannot say it more plainly: The risk is real and potentially deadly,” said Shane Fitzsimmons, rural fire service commissioner for the state of New South Wales. “People need to act now.” Scores of fires have erupted in southeastern Australia as temperatures have soared to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40% more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found. The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health - even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive. The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.
HEALTH
April 9, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
REASON No. 495 to flush the uppers: Cocaine and amphetamines may increase the risk of stroke. Crunching numbers from a database of more than 3 million hospital patients, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas found that amphetamine abuse was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in hemorrhagic stroke -- bleeding within the brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
One year into California's state prison realignment program, Los Angeles County is seeing an unexpected number of high-risk offenders coming into its probation system, including some with a history of severe mental illness. It remains unclear whether realignment - which shifted responsibility for some nonviolent offenders from prisons to county jails and from state parole to county probation - is having an effect on crime rates. But a report by a county advisory body found that a majority of state prison inmates who have been released to county probation are at a high risk of reoffending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2013 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Transportation announced a crackdown Thursday on what it calls "high risk" commercial bus companies that skirt safety measures and employ drivers who commit serious traffic offenses. The move comes after two recent bus crashes, one in San Bernardino County earlier this month that killed seven people and another in December, in which nine people in Oregon perished on a vehicle operated by a driver who had worked beyond the 70-hour weekly maximum. Federal officials over the next two months will step up inspections and encourage local police to focus enforcement on bus drivers who speed, make unsafe lane changes and use cellphones while driving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
FALFURRIAS, Texas - The South Texas sun had scorched the woman's face. Flies swarmed over her lips. Under a nearby mesquite plant, a plastic water jug lay empty. Brooks County Chief Deputy Sheriff Urbino Martinez picked it up and walked back to a group of officials gathered around the sprawled body of the dead migrant. "She got left behind for some reason," he said. "Either she got ill or she just got tired and they left her, knowing very well she wasn't going to get out of this area.
NEWS
August 2, 2005 | Joe Robinson
With rivers raging faster than they have in years, fatalities and rescues have jumped dramatically at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks this year. Only one person had died by this time in 2004, but so far this year eight people have been killed. Four drowned, two were struck by lightning and two climbers were killed on icy rock on Mt. Whitney. In the most recent fatalities, a Boy Scout and a Scout leader were killed by lightning last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County officials have placed two staff members at Olive View- UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar on paid leave after allegations that they had participated in a makeshift beauty salon atop medical equipment in the ward for high-risk newborns, according to county officials. The county this week also opened an investigation into broader allegations that doctors, nurses and staff at the neonatal intensive care unit put babies at risk through substandard care. The allegations were contained in two anonymous complaints received by the commission that accredits the facility.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By David Pierson
Americans eat more chicken than any other meat. Yet when it comes to food safety, poultry is fraught with risks that consumer groups say aren't being fully addressed by producers and federal inspectors. That's the view of two reports released Thursday. The first, by the Pew Charitable Trusts, examines two recent salmonella outbreaks linked to Foster Farms chicken and concludes the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) lacks the authority to properly protect the public.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Jim Puzzanghera and E. Scott Reckard
WASHINGTON - Government regulators approved a sweeping new set of rules for the nation's biggest banks that ban them from the kind of ultra-high-risk trading that nearly collapsed the world's financial system. Despite a fierce lobbying effort to prevent the new measure, five of the nation's top regulatory agencies on Tuesday approved the final version of a key component of the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul law. The so-called Volcker rule, named after former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, prohibits banks from trading for their own profit rather than on behalf of customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Emily Foxhall
The Orange County district attorney's office planned Wednesday to oppose the parole of a former Marine convicted of stabbing and killing another Marine in 1980. Over 20 years later, the inmate, Roy Garcia, 54, remains a risk to the public, according to the Orange County district attorney's office. Garcia possessed illegal knives and engaged in mutual combat while incarcerated, prosecutors said. He blamed alcohol for his violence, according to a statement from the district attorney's office.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
In the typical life of a viral video, a reality show mishap becomes a YouTube clip, which then reaches the masses online. Uncommon Content, a New York filmmaker, is betting it can do the opposite. Uncommon, which produces the Reserve Channel on YouTube, makes half-hour shows for the Web and tries to get them picked up by networks to turn them into mainstream programs. It has so far produced seven Web series, one of which features musician, producer and entrepreneur Pharrell Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
FALFURRIAS, Texas - The South Texas sun had scorched the woman's face. Flies swarmed over her lips. Under a nearby mesquite plant, a plastic water jug lay empty. Brooks County Chief Deputy Sheriff Urbino Martinez picked it up and walked back to a group of officials gathered around the sprawled body of the dead migrant. "She got left behind for some reason," he said. "Either she got ill or she just got tired and they left her, knowing very well she wasn't going to get out of this area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Paige St. John
The federal court official in charge of running healthcare for California's troubled prison system on Monday directed the state to immediately remove more than a third of the inmates at two state prisons because of the risk of valley fever. The directive from J. Clark Kelso follows an expert's report filed in U.S. District Court last week concluding that the incidence of the potentially fatal fungus poses a "public health emergency. " California corrections officials had no immediate response, though the department said last month it was working on its own valley fever response plan.
NEWS
April 25, 1993
Foothill Family Service, a nonprofit family service agency in the San Gabriel Valley, is offering counseling and support to the Garvey School District. Therapists are available to offer counseling and referrals for students who are at high risk of dropping out. Treatment is provided at the school facilities. The Garvey School District serves Rosemead, Alhambra and Monterey Park.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2006 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission, which in February required most hedge funds to register as investment advisors, is now targeting funds that have weak internal controls for regulatory action, a senior SEC official said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Michele and Russell Poland's credit was shot, but they managed to buy their suburban dream home anyway. After a business bankruptcy and a home foreclosure, they turned to a rare option in this era of tightfisted banking - a subprime loan. The Polands paid nearly $10,000 in upfront fees for the privilege of securing a mortgage at 10.9% interest. And they had to raid their retirement account for a 35% down payment. Most borrowers would balk at such stiff terms. But with prices rising, the Polands wanted to snag a four-bedroom home in Temecula near top-rated schools for their 5-year-old son. By later this year, they figure, they'll be able to refinance into a standard loan.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
When a person takes his or her own life, stunned survivors often ask, "How could we not have known?" and tell themselves that the fateful act might have been averted if someone had been aware of the victim's suicidal thinking. But is there a screening test that could, with some confidence, detect those at risk of committing suicide, and would wide use of it prevent some of the 37,000 suicides that occur annually in the United States? We just don't know, a federal panel said Monday in a draft report . The acknowledgment came from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force after an exhaustive review of existing research.
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