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High School Exit Exam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2000
The first two sample math questions from the new California state exit exam (Dec. 17) suggest that the test writers are not only out of touch with reality with respect to what is reasonable to expect of a high school graduate but with physical reality as well. The first problem states, "After her basketball class, Regina calculated that the height of her best jump from the floor can be described by the equation: y = 5t - 5t(squared), where y is the height in meters and t is the time in seconds."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Josh Garcia got his first police citation in sixth grade for spray-painting graffiti at his middle school. Then came four more tickets for truancy and violating curfew. The worst was at Roosevelt High in Boyle Heights, where he got caught with brass knuckles and was sentenced to weekend detention in Central Juvenile Hall - a scary experience, he said. By senior year, Garcia had had so many run-ins with the law and fallen so far behind in school that he failed to pass the high school exit exam or earn enough credits to graduate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified sophomores passed the state high school exit exam on their first try, a record number that reflects six years of consecutive improvement, the school district announced Wednesday. Supt. John Deasy credited the success to a more targeted effort to use data to identify students struggling with the reading, writing and math skills and to give them more help. "The results are the best I could ever have imagined," Deasy said. "I'm very proud. " The pass rate reflects a 23 percentage point gain from 44% in 2003-04.
OPINION
May 6, 2003
Re "State Education Official Seeks to Delay Exit Exam," May 2: As a secondary mathematics teacher, I can accept any reason for postponing or canceling altogether the high school exit exam, except that "many [students] were not taught algebra in middle school and missed the opportunity for a grounding in skills required to pass the test." The algebra concepts covered on the exit exam are rudimentary math skills, and students would have been exposed to them repeatedly in every middle and high school math course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Advocates for children with learning disabilities challenged California's new high school exit exam in federal court Tuesday, saying the test violates U.S. law by discriminating against children with dyslexia and other disorders. The class-action suit, filed in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2006 | From Times staff reports
More than 400,000 high school seniors have passed the California High School Exit Exam, according to final results announced Thursday by the state Department of Education. An additional 819 students passed the test in July, raising the overall pass rate to 91.4%. Nearly 38,000 students failed to pass and were urged to attend community colleges, adult schools or return as seniors.
NEWS
January 25, 2000
With a deadline looming, California education officials picked American Institutes for Research to develop the state's high school exit exam. AIR is a Washington-based company with a West Coast office in Palo Alto. The exit exam is a math and language arts test that California students must pass to graduate from high school. The Class of 2004 will be the first high school class required to pass the exam.
OPINION
June 29, 2003
Re "Exit Exam Fails the Test," June 14: As a retired life-time educator, it pains me terribly to observe the terrible waste of human and financial resources going into flawed programs of "toughening up" educational requirements, including the testing mania and the imposition of college entrance courses on all students. The emphasis should be to offer educational opportunities to fit the wide variety of student needs, not to fit every student to a rigid set of controls. For many students, it seems to me obvious that it is more important that they be taught to balance a checkbook, compare discounted prices, understand interest costs, and many other everyday numerical situations, than to recognize the value of "d" from a diagram showing a slope of two-thirds to receive a diploma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2006 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A day after indicating he was prepared to strike down California's controversial high school exit exam, an Oakland judge reiterated his position Tuesday but delayed issuing a final ruling. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Robert B. Freedman postponed his decision after lawyers for the state raised questions at a hearing about whether a temporary injunction against the test should apply to all students who have failed the exam or only to the handful who filed the lawsuit.
OPINION
August 3, 2012 | By Arthur Levine
Despite the barrage of criticism that schools are spending increasing amounts of time testing our children and teachers are being forced to teach to the test, the reality is that testing is no fad. Initiatives like California's STAR test, the high school exit exam and Academic Performance Index, or API, scores are here to stay, and are likely to become even more pervasive in schools nationwide. But in the years ahead the way testing happens must change in a manner that will benefit our children and that parents are likely to embrace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of photos of standardized tests have begun to appear on social-networking sites in California, raising concerns about test security and cheating by students. In the worst-case scenario, the photos could lead to invalidating test scores for entire schools or prevent the state from using certain tests. For now, officials have warned school districts to heighten test security and investigate breaches. Students are not allowed to have access to cellphones or other devices that can take pictures when the tests are administered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
OPINION
June 27, 2009
California is broke, but kids still need to know how to read and do basic algebra. It's an insult to the aspirations of California students that legislators moved to kill the high school exit exam :a=latimes_1min&feed:c=topstories&feed:i=47535918&nopaging=1 as a graduation requirement. Excusing it as a budget move, all six Democratic legislators on the budget conference committee voted quickly, with little debate and no real public airing.
OPINION
April 24, 2009
It could be, as university researchers conjecture, that negative stereotypes of minorities and girls lead these two groups to perform worse on California's high school exit exam. That doesn't mean, however, that the state should back off from the exam intended to require a minimum level of competency among those who receive a diploma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg
California's high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as white boys, according to a study released Tuesday. It also found that the exam, which became a graduation requirement in 2007, has "had no positive effect on student achievement."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 80% of California ninth-graders took the high school exit exam when it was given for the first time last month. In a letter to superintendents, Delaine Eastin, state superintendent of public instruction, congratulated districts on "such fine participation" in this year's voluntary exam. About 395,000 ninth-graders, out of 484,000, took the reading and writing portion of the test. The California Department of Education expects that even more students took the mathematics test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
As early as fourth grade, students who will be at risk of failing the high school exit exam -- a state requirement to earn a diploma -- can be identified based on grades, classroom behavior and test scores, according to a new study released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
More seniors are passing the state's high school exit exam, but failure rates among poor and minority students remain disproportionately high, and dropouts are not counted in the state's numbers, the state Department of Education said Thursday. As of May, the pass rate for the class of 2007 was 93.3%, a 2.1 percentage point increase over the class of 2006 for that period. The pass rate also was higher for some lower-scoring groups, including African American students, who saw a gain of 4.
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