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January 17, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a staff writer for L.A. Weekly. Her collection of essays and reportage, "No Crystal Stair: African-Americans in the City of Angels," was published in December by Verso
Let's call him "Perry." * If you grew up in Los Angeles (back when it was still hip to dub the mix "melting pot") and sat through a homeroom roll call sandwiching you somewhere between a Martinez, Masjedi, Matsuda and Meizel, you knew one--but more than likely two. This Culver City "Perry," a classmate of mine, had Farrah Fawcett-feathered blond hair, moist blue-gray eyes and a Tiger Beat dimple in his chin.
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MAGAZINE
January 17, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a staff writer for L.A. Weekly. Her collection of essays and reportage, "No Crystal Stair: African-Americans in the City of Angels," was published in December by Verso
Let's call him "Perry." * If you grew up in Los Angeles (back when it was still hip to dub the mix "melting pot") and sat through a homeroom roll call sandwiching you somewhere between a Martinez, Masjedi, Matsuda and Meizel, you knew one--but more than likely two. This Culver City "Perry," a classmate of mine, had Farrah Fawcett-feathered blond hair, moist blue-gray eyes and a Tiger Beat dimple in his chin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Vicki Beltran put her life into a box was three years ago, when the teen-ager and her family packed their belongings to flee strife-torn El Salvador for the United States. The 17-year-old has again, so to speak, put her life in a box. This time the objects are symbolic--like the burgundy rose petals signifying her love of nature, or a tiny golden bell representing a favorite teacher from her homeland. The outspoken instructor was slain by the military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Vicki Beltran put her life into a box was three years ago, when the teen-ager and her family packed their belongings to flee strife-torn El Salvador for the United States. The 17-year-old has again, so to speak, put her life in a box. This time the objects are symbolic--like the burgundy rose petals signifying her love of nature, or a tiny golden bell representing a favorite teacher from her homeland. The outspoken instructor was slain by the military.
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