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High School Students Employment

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NEWS
July 4, 1993 | MARESA ARCHER
Julia and Danielle Delgado, the Santa Ana twins who had to work their way through high school, now have their tuition to Mater Dei High School paid in full, plus a small college fund started.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking back on the last year, Ivanna McFaul admits her work schedule was a little extreme. The Pacifica High School senior held down two part-time jobs that had her working seven days a week--on top of school. "It was just too much. I didn't have time for anything," said Ivanna, 17, of Garden Grove. She quit one job and now works about 20 to 25 hours a week at a coffee shop in Santa Ana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1991
Beginning with the class of 1994, students graduating from Los Angeles district high schools will leave with a "diploma warranty" promising employers that the district will re-enroll them if they prove unqualified to enter the work force. In announcing the program Wednesday, Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. William Anton said that it was designed to give value to diplomas issued by the district.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
Like many young, computer-savvy college graduates, Timothy C. Brown never worries about finding work. He gets flooded by offers, and recently started a $30,000-a-year job as a systems engineer for an Internet services firm in Atlanta. But in this case, there's a catch: Brown never went to college, and he's only 18 years old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City business leaders and school officials on Thursday pledged to work together to better prepare local students for the work force. Armed with the results of a major yearlong study of Santa Ana business, the groups said they plan to work toward implementing programs and curriculum changes that will increase a student's chances for success after high school.
SPORTS
December 7, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Pacific 10 Conference is investigating whether University of Washington athletic boosters improperly provided quarterback Billy Joe Hobert with a job in high school and financial benefits after he joined the Huskies. Hobert, a junior, has been declared ineligible to play football for accepting $50,000 in loans last spring from the father-in-law of a friend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1993 | TOMMY LI
Last month, Isela Cervantes of Glendale High School lacked the confidence to go job hunting with her peers. But the 17-year-old girl's confidence was boosted after completing a job training course offered by We Care . . . for Youth, a program sponsored by the Glendale Galleria, the school district and the state's Employment Development Department's Youth Employment and Opportunity Program.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If the newly elected mayor wants a sign to lead by this morning, he might take a good look at a Los Angeles high school program that trains youngsters in finance and business and places them in real jobs. The Los Angeles Academy of Finance is teaching 145 juniors and seniors at three L.A. schools: Woodrow Wilson, Los Angeles and Downtown Business Magnet. It will add Dorsey High School to the program in September.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
Like many young, computer-savvy college graduates, Timothy C. Brown never worries about finding work. He gets flooded by offers, and recently started a $30,000-a-year job as a systems engineer for an Internet services firm in Atlanta. But in this case, there's a catch: Brown never went to college, and he's only 18 years old.
NEWS
May 13, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In at least one quarter, President Clinton's recent call for volunteerism has not only been heard, it has become a rallying cry. Schools are embracing community service, not just as an extracurricular pastime or padding for college applications, but as a formal part of academic programs, often a mandatory one. "Service is becoming part of the curriculum," said Bob Collins, director of instruction for senior high schools for the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | JEFF KASS
The message was simple: Santa Ana students, struggling to make ends meet and go on to college, need more paid internships. To get the point across, about 350 residents from throughout Orange County gathered in St. Anne's Church Tuesday night to rally for the cause and extract promises from local politicians and business leaders. One commitment came from Orange County Business Council representatives, who promised up to 60 paid internships within the next year.
NEWS
May 13, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In at least one quarter, President Clinton's recent call for volunteerism has not only been heard, it has become a rallying cry. Schools are embracing community service, not just as an extracurricular pastime or padding for college applications, but as a formal part of academic programs, often a mandatory one. "Service is becoming part of the curriculum," said Bob Collins, director of instruction for senior high schools for the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
A service that aims to help high school students find jobs will be established as a result of the 1997 La Habra Kids Summit. Students from local high schools and junior high schools gathered at the Kids Summit in February to discuss citywide problems and propose solutions. One proposal called for the city to start a job finding service. The city's Community Services Department, through its Employment and Training Division, agreed to start YES--Youth Employment Service--on May 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
Responding to concerns that high school graduates don't have enough job skills, the Orange County Department of Education has created an Employability Transcript to showcase students' practical skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1996 | JEFF KASS
An award-winning program that places Santa Ana high school students in local law firms and other businesses for paid summer internships wrapped up its 1996 session Wednesday with closing ceremonies for the participants. Project SELF, which stands for Summer Employment in Law Firms, is sponsored by the Orange County Bar Foundation. This year, the program placed 43 students in eight-week internships that paid $6.43 an hour for filing, answering telephones and other office duties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994 | ED BOND
The first 15 students to finish San Fernando High School's business academy internship program have reaped more than credits--most got summer jobs. "Many of the students have gotten jobs for the summer because of the skills they have learned and the contacts they have made by being in the business academy," said Arlene Rosenblatt, chairwoman of the business education department at the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | JEFF KASS
The message was simple: Santa Ana students, struggling to make ends meet and go on to college, need more paid internships. To get the point across, about 350 residents from throughout Orange County gathered in St. Anne's Church Tuesday night to rally for the cause and extract promises from local politicians and business leaders. One commitment came from Orange County Business Council representatives, who promised up to 60 paid internships within the next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | ED BOND
For 30 teen-agers from Burbank, high school this spring has been as much preparation for getting a job as for college. Responding to complaints that graduates don't know enough about getting and keeping a job, school officials and business leaders have teamed up to provide instruction in basic business skills such as writing a resume or a project proposal and helped students prepare for job interviews.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate voted final passage Thursday of landmark legislation to train high school students to enter the American work force--the first national apprenticeship or "school-to-work" system in the nation's history. The bill, which the House approved Wednesday and which now goes to President Clinton for his signature, is considered an integral part of the Administration's agenda for revising education and job training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
High school students who hate their classes and fail several subjects may get to learn off campus and earn money. The William S. Hart Union High School District and Santa Clarita officials have created the At-Risk Student Partnership Program to interest youths who might drop out. The program allows students to attend two classes a day off campus and then participate in work projects or pursue career opportunities for which they are paid.
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