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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
The Los Angeles Conservancy today sued the Los Angeles Unified School District to stop the proposed demolition of the Ambassador Hotel to make way for a high school and commercial space. In its Superior Court lawsuit, the conservancy claims the environmental assessment conducted by the district on the project is inadequate because it fails to fully review alternatives such as using the present building for the school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989
The Los Angeles Unified School District board voted Monday to endorse a plan to allow voluntary testing for steroid use among high school athletes. The plan, by board member Roberta Weintraub, calls on individual schools to develop their own testing programs. Athletes found to have used steroids will be banned from school sports for a year. The board rejected a provision that would have allowed mandatory testing of athletes at selected sports events, citing constitutional concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1989
The new owners of the historic Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles vowed Thursday to fight any attempt by the Los Angeles Unified School District to put a new high school on the Mid-Wilshire District property. On Thursday, Wilshire Center Partners, originally known as Anglo-Wilshire Partners, completed the purchase of the 23.5-acre property for $64 million from the J. Myer Schine family. The sale went through despite city plans to build a 2,000-student high school on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back home, the Los Angeles Unified School District gets about as much respect as the woebegone L.A. Clippers basketball team. But here at the national academic decathlon finals, the school district is treated more like the Chicago Bulls, a mighty power to be reckoned with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were hunkered down Friday, focusing on what will soon be the most intense 11 hours of their high school careers. In last-minute cram sessions across the Los Angeles Unified School District, hundreds of competitors were readying themselves for what has become one of the most hotly contested and widely watched high school rivalries. It's not a basketball tournament. It's not a football game. It's a test.
SPORTS
October 26, 1997 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
High school coaches in the City Section are fuming, and deservedly so. The new three-year UTLA contract with the Los Angeles Unified School District once again leaves coaches without a pay raise. In other words, they will go through the 1990s without a pay increase. "My 25 cents an hour continues into the next millennium," Kennedy football Coach Bob Francola said. Coaching stipends range from $912 to the maximum $1,785 for football, basketball, baseball, softball and track head coaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As the Los Angeles Unified School District begins for the first time to grapple with the prospects of long-term growth, a district analyst reported Thursday that the state's largest public school system will need at least eight new high schools in the next decade to accommodate about 30,000 more teenagers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Cleveland High School has won a $31,500 federal arts grant, Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) announced Wednesday in Washington, D.C. The "Schools for the New Millennium Grant," given by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will support a program by Cleveland High and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that integrates art with the study of American history.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | ELSTON CARR
Riley High School has received an $8,236 grant from the Barbara Bush Foundation of Family Literacy to teach pregnant minors how to develop reading skills in their children. Called the Books for Babies Family Project, the grant will be used to create lesson plans, buy children's books and fund trips to local public libraries for Riley High School students, said Barbara Busch, the school's director of curriculum.
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