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NEWS
December 19, 2010 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
High Sierra didn't exaggerate the name of its A.T. Gear Ultimate Access 36-inch Drop-Bottom Wheeled Duffel ($134.95). As the biggest wheeled bag in the High Sierra stable, it provides 9,576 cubic inches of storage. The main compartment has an easy-access opening, and the drop-bottom can hold shoes, boots and other gear. Or zip out the mesh divider separating the top and bottom sections. Backpack straps are built into the bag, which weighs 12 pounds. Info: Luggage Online , (888)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
GROVELAND, Calif. - The Rim fire that scorched a huge swath of Sierra Nevada forests also severely altered the habitat that is home to several of California's rarest animals: the great gray owl, the Sierra Nevada red fox and the Pacific fisher. The fire burned 257,000 acres of High Sierra wilderness straddling the Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park that harbors a geographically isolated and genetically distinct clan of roughly 200 great gray owls. The blaze also came within 12 miles of 10 breeding pairs of the subspecies of red fox clinging to survival in the cold, steep slopes above the tree line, raising fears they could have been eaten by coyotes trying to escape the smoke and flames.
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SCIENCE
August 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A federal proposal to make the Sierra Nevada as comfortable as possible for some of their rarest amphibian inhabitants has stirred a backlash from business owners over the economic pain it could cause the region's recreation industry. Many opponents worry the proposal would do more to protect frogs and toads than non-native trout --  a top tourist draw in mountain resort communities where cash registers ring up purchases this time of year made by vacationers, hikers and fishing enthusiasts.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A federal proposal to make the Sierra Nevada as comfortable as possible for some of their rarest amphibian inhabitants has stirred a backlash from business owners over the economic pain it could cause the region's recreation industry. Many opponents worry the proposal would do more to protect frogs and toads than non-native trout --  a top tourist draw in mountain resort communities where cash registers ring up purchases this time of year made by vacationers, hikers and fishing enthusiasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
MONO PASS TRAIL - Mary Breckenridge crosses the High Sierra every year, with only her horse and two mules for company. She always leaves in September, when heat still tents the Central Valley but cool mountain breezes stir silvery-green aspen leaves. Higher up, the nights could be so cold that the water in her coffee pot turned rock-hard. It's happened. She kept going. Packing and unpacking 300 pounds of gear daily, making and breaking camp, starting her fire from twigs. Reporter's notebook: Follow the journey It made her feel thrillingly self-reliant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
GROVELAND, Calif. - The Rim fire that scorched a huge swath of Sierra Nevada forests also severely altered the habitat that is home to several of California's rarest animals: the great gray owl, the Sierra Nevada red fox and the Pacific fisher. The fire burned 257,000 acres of High Sierra wilderness straddling the Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park that harbors a geographically isolated and genetically distinct clan of roughly 200 great gray owls. The blaze also came within 12 miles of 10 breeding pairs of the subspecies of red fox clinging to survival in the cold, steep slopes above the tree line, raising fears they could have been eaten by coyotes trying to escape the smoke and flames.
TRAVEL
September 27, 1987 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a nationally known magazine and newspaper writer
I remember how secure I felt, there in the High Sierra. I remember how comforting it was to have him to lean on in that wild and craggy land. I remember the rush of the sundown breeze that shook the hemlocks beside our trail and rippled his coarse golden hair. Most of all, I remember his eyes--deep pools of amber that mirrored affection, humor and a certain stubborn streak. We met near Tuolomne Meadows. The attraction was strong. We traveled together six days.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
It's a winter wonderland in summer here in the High Sierra. Five inches of snow has fallen on the summit--a record for Sept. 2. The last time snow fell here Labor Day weekend was 25 years ago. Not only is the snowfall rare, it's also unusual for it to fall as low as it has--7,200 feet. Heavenly ski resort on Lake Tahoe's south shore reported 3 to 4 inches of snow on its upper slopes above 10,000 feet. Two inches fell on its Top of the Tram at 8,200 feet.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC and MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thousands of people were stranded in the High Sierra on New Year's Day as the second major storm of the week raked the northern half of California, piling snow up to 20 feet deep in the mountains above Lake Tahoe. Interstate 80 and Highway 50--the two main routes across the mountains--were shut down for much of the day by 10-foot snowdrifts. It was the second time in less than a week that both highways had been closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Earlier this year, a little trifle called "Extreme" came and went on the ABC schedule without anyone seeming to notice. It starred James Brolin as the leader of a rescue team of sexy young hotheads in a ski resort town. Now, NBC is uncorking "High Sierra Search and Rescue" on Sunday. There are only three differences between this and "Extreme": no snow, a more cumbersome title and Robert Conrad as its star (although, technically, that may not really qualify as a difference).
OPINION
October 30, 2012
Re "A High Sierra challenge," Column One, Oct. 26 Diana Marcum's story about Mary Breckenridge's trek across the High Sierra brought tears to my eyes and joy to my heart. The story of two unique Californians was so well written, so filled with such keen detail, that it left me grateful that I was reading this on printed paper like the old world Mary celebrates in the Sierras. Thank you for featuring such a life-affirming story on the front page, which often must chronicle so much that is askew in this world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012
Sept. 2 It's night. Mary Breckenridge is zooming her truck along the narrow, twisting road to Edison Lake. "You ever get nervous driving in the mountains?" I ask, trying to sound merely curious. "Never!" she says, accelerating. Once in the sagging white tent at the "resort," Mary takes out her bear earrings and her hearing aid, lays down in her sleeping bag on one of the four cots and that's it, she's asleep. Her strong, steady snore begins as her head sinks into the pillow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
MONO PASS TRAIL - Mary Breckenridge crosses the High Sierra every year, with only her horse and two mules for company. She always leaves in September, when heat still tents the Central Valley but cool mountain breezes stir silvery-green aspen leaves. Higher up, the nights could be so cold that the water in her coffee pot turned rock-hard. It's happened. She kept going. Packing and unpacking 300 pounds of gear daily, making and breaking camp, starting her fire from twigs. Reporter's notebook: Follow the journey It made her feel thrillingly self-reliant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
HUNTINGTON LAKE, Calif. - Comanche has one pale blue eye, one deep brown and a prancing gait that has cowboy Morgan Austin suspecting this mystery horse once paraded around an arena. Until two weeks ago, Comanche wouldn't let anyone in the saddle. It took Morgan, 17, two months of talking to him "real quiet-like," slipping on a saddle blanket, then the saddle, before he could hoist his own lanky frame onto the brown-and-white quarter horse. Now, on a day when the sky is pale with heat and ragged breaths of wind kick up thick, sticky dust, Comanche and Morgan lead the way down a boulder-strewn Sierra trail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The HighSierra town of Mammoth Lakes said Monday that it filed for bankruptcy because it cannot afford to pay a $43-million breach-of-contract judgment in a lawsuit brought against it by a developer. In a prepared statement, Mammoth Lakes officials said "bankruptcy, unfortunately, is the only option left" for the town, whose largest creditor, Mammoth Lakes Land Acquisition, had won a state court order requiring full payment by June 30, 2012. Facing a judgment nearly three times the size of its annual operating budget and a $2.8-million shortfall in its 2011-12 fiscal year, the town had already cut many services and asked employees to take reductions in pay. Compounding problems, the adjacent Mammoth Mountain ski resort was forced to lay off 70 full-time employees last year because of a dearth of snow.
NEWS
October 29, 2011
Each year, Julie Kirby treks out to Bishop Creek in the Sierras to catch the autumn colors. Last October, light snow fell the night before she arrived. She had set out hoping to beat the snowfall, but the precipitation turned out to be a bonus. "I had never photographed the golden leaves dusted with snow, before the cold turned them black and the wind ripped them away," she said. The Glendale resident used a Canon PowerShot A720 IS to photograph this wintery scene.  View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
TRAVEL
September 5, 1999 | JOHN McKINNEY, John McKinney is the author of "Day Hiker's Guide to California's State Parks" (Olympus Press, $14.95)
If a hike that offers fabulous High Sierra vistas from its beginning, middle and end sounds appealing, this ridge-top ramble near Mammoth Mountain is the trek for you. Vistas are dominated by the Minarets, said to have been named for their resemblance to the spires on a Muslim temple. An eye-popping view of the saw-tooth-shaped range is easily gathered from Inyo National Forest's 9,265-foot Minaret Vista, the beginning of this hike.
TRAVEL
August 27, 1989 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a magazine and newspaper writer
A friend telephoned to say that she was going to travel by mule among the High Sierra camps of Yosemite. What, she asked, would be the best luggage? I remembered the dust along some of those meadow trails. I remembered how swiftly my red canvas bag turned to brick-brown, and how unzipping it each night sent up puffs of dirt like smoke signals. I thought once again of the dentist's wife whom I met as we saddled up at the Tuolumne Meadows stables.
TRAVEL
June 26, 2011
Camping's pluses and minuses Regarding "The Lighter Side of Hiking" by John Flinn, June 19: At $150 a night per adult and $87 for kids, Yosemite's High Sierra Camps should be renamed "Yosemite's High-Priced and Financially Out-of-Reach Sierra Camps. " Barbara Correa Laguna Niguel Compliments to Flinn on his article. I enjoyed his accurate portrayal of what the High Sierra Camp experience is like, and my son and I enjoyed having him as a cabin mate at Sunrise camp one night last summer.
TRAVEL
June 19, 2011
There are two ways to snag a spot in Yosemite's High Sierra Camps: the lottery and cancellations. The lottery is held each fall, typically in September and October. You can get an application by calling (801) 559-4909, writing to Yosemite Reservations, High Sierra Desk, 6771 N. Palm Ave., Fresno 93704 or applying online at http://www.yosemitepark.com/Accomodations_HighSierraCamps.aspx . After mid-February, space, opened through cancellations, can be reserved by calling (801) 559-4909.
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