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High Society

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2010
'High Society' Where: KTLA When: 9:30 p.m. Rating: TV-14-DL (may be unsuitable for children under the age of 14, with advisories for suggestive dialogue and coarse language)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As its name promises, "The Great Beauty" is drop-dead gorgeous, a film that is luxuriously, seductively, stunningly cinematic. But more than intoxicating imagery is on director Paolo Sorrentino's mind, a lot more. One of Italy's most impressive contemporary filmmakers, Sorrentino has a superb sense of how to fill a wide screen and, working with his longtime cinematographer Luca Bigazzi, a wizard with camera movement, his visuals display the intoxicating richness of color 35-millimeter film in a way few contemporary ventures can match.
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NATIONAL
September 16, 2009 | Tina Susman
What did the butler hear? Can the peeved French maid and the combative ex-chauffeur be trusted? If only the pet dachshunds, Boysie and Girlsie, could talk. It might make it easier for jurors -- who this week are expected to begin reviewing four months of testimony and thousands of pages of evidence -- to decide if the son of Brooke Astor, the late philanthropist and New York social doyenne, fleeced his mother of millions. Final arguments entered their second day today in the trial of the son, Anthony D. Marshall, 85, and Astor's estate attorney, Francis X. Morrissey Jr., who are accused of coercing Astor to change her will, steering most of her roughly $198-million estate to Marshall when she died in 2007 at the age of 105. The trial has revealed the clashing worlds of New York, where Wall Street's crash has ended many people's extravagant ways, but where a rare few still have untold millions to spend.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Denise Hamilton, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Great con artists understand this about human nature: The suckers want to be taken. In 1978, a poor, semi-educated German teenager named Christian K. Gerhartsreiter arrived in New England on a falsified student visa. Brilliant, charismatic and twisted, he soon realized that Americans were easily duped by claims of great wealth and European titles. Cultivating an eccentric, Segway-riding persona, a wardrobe from "The Official Preppy Handbook" and a posh accent, Gerhartsreiter honed his deceptions from San Marino's leafy streets to Greenwich, Conn., to Wall Street, assuming roles of British baronet, Hollywood producer, Ivy League graduate and high-flying bond trader.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2002 | . GERALDINE BAUM
"OH Muffie, darling, you look so festive tonight!" David Patrick Columbia says, bussing one Muffie Potter Aston, a socialite in a white satin bustier. They greet one another inside the lobby of the City Center, where the American Ballet Theatre is debuting its fall season. Muffie is married to Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
At the very least, "High Society" has more vitality than "If Not for You," the monotonous buzz of a comedy it replaces in the CBS lineup tonight. And it's somewhat funnier, too, ever so often snapping off bright lines of dialogue worthy of guffaws. Dott (Mary McDonnell) to her 17-year-old conservative son, Brendan (Dan O'Donahue): "I think you're brainwashed by that dangerous gang you run with." Brendan: "Mom, that's the Young Republicans."
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly covers film and theater for The Times Orange County Edition.
The Marx Brothers can give you a lift like nobody else. It's all that gleeful anarchy--riding in their etiquette-busting, pretension-puncturing slipstream is like being a kid who's been given a chance to break all the rules. Of the Marx Brothers' movie comedies, "A Night at the Opera" (1935), being shown at the Wilshire Auditorium on Friday night, is generally considered the best.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
Melanie Ann Chieu, in flowing white gown, walks in measured steps along the edge of the parquet dance floor in the Gold Coast Room of Doubletree Inn. Periodically she stops, faces the crowd and, to the nod of her tuxedoed father, slowly dips into a full curtsy. Everyone applauds. History would have it that Melanie Ann is being introduced to society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philip Baloun, 61, one of America's preeminent party planners, died June 28 of pancreatic cancer at his home in Manhattan, the New York Times reported. Trained as a florist, Baloun's work required him to also employ "in equal measure the skills of a theater designer, engineer and sorcerer," the newspaper reported. For the 70th birthday of financier George Soros, he built a town square that would summon up visions of Soros' home country of Hungary.
NEWS
January 26, 1986 | MICHAEL DOBBS, The Washington Post
France is agog over a new murder mystery--a tale of intrigue in high society that features the premier's best friend as the victim and the nation's most celebrated woman jockey as the ambitious and estranged wife of the dead man. The saga is a godsend to newspaper editors already bored with the somewhat sluggish campaign for nationwide elections in March. Every day seems to produce an intriguing new detail about the beautiful people caught up in a plot worthy of an Inspector Maigret novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When he died a year ago last month at the age of 92, Louis Auchincloss had amassed an astonishing body of work over more than six decades: nearly 50 novels and story collections and 18 nonfiction books, many written while he was working as a distinguished lawyer. Though often denigrated for concentrating on the claustrophobic world of New York's Social Register set, in fact he delved deep into a protean world of inherited and self-made wealth, of insiders and interlopers, of icons and iconoclasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2010
'High Society' Where: KTLA When: 9:30 p.m. Rating: TV-14-DL (may be unsuitable for children under the age of 14, with advisories for suggestive dialogue and coarse language)
NATIONAL
September 16, 2009 | Tina Susman
What did the butler hear? Can the peeved French maid and the combative ex-chauffeur be trusted? If only the pet dachshunds, Boysie and Girlsie, could talk. It might make it easier for jurors -- who this week are expected to begin reviewing four months of testimony and thousands of pages of evidence -- to decide if the son of Brooke Astor, the late philanthropist and New York social doyenne, fleeced his mother of millions. Final arguments entered their second day today in the trial of the son, Anthony D. Marshall, 85, and Astor's estate attorney, Francis X. Morrissey Jr., who are accused of coercing Astor to change her will, steering most of her roughly $198-million estate to Marshall when she died in 2007 at the age of 105. The trial has revealed the clashing worlds of New York, where Wall Street's crash has ended many people's extravagant ways, but where a rare few still have untold millions to spend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
ACCORDING to the Chinese calendar, this is the year of the rat, but on television, 2008 belongs to the New York society dame. First we had the one-two punch of "Cashmere Mafia" and "Lipstick Jungle," stilettoed clumps of magazine editors and power execs juggling nannies and iPhones. Now Bravo brings us the reality version: "The Real Housewives of New York City."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philip Baloun, 61, one of America's preeminent party planners, died June 28 of pancreatic cancer at his home in Manhattan, the New York Times reported. Trained as a florist, Baloun's work required him to also employ "in equal measure the skills of a theater designer, engineer and sorcerer," the newspaper reported. For the 70th birthday of financier George Soros, he built a town square that would summon up visions of Soros' home country of Hungary.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IF it didn't make him sound like an old brick building or a theatrical repertory company, Louis Auchincloss could well be described as an American institution. The author of more than 60 books of fiction and nonfiction and the recipient of the National Medal of Arts, he was designated a "Living Landmark" by the New York Landmarks Conservancy in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IF it didn't make him sound like an old brick building or a theatrical repertory company, Louis Auchincloss could well be described as an American institution. The author of more than 60 books of fiction and nonfiction and the recipient of the National Medal of Arts, he was designated a "Living Landmark" by the New York Landmarks Conservancy in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2007 | Robin Givhan, Washington Post
Publisher Prosper Assouline is sniffing a $250 book. He has hoisted the enormous tome "Masks" by Thierry Despont from the table in front of him, swung it open and inserted his nose. He looks a bit like a bookworm with an extreme case of myopia. But he is not reading. Although Assouline is a man who sells books, he is not one who traffics in words. He sells style. And he believes wholeheartedly that one can -- and should -- judge a book by its cover.
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