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OPINION
August 5, 2012
Re "Report slams colleges run for a profit," July 31 For many years I worked as a teacher at several such for-profit schools. I also was on the administrative end and was privy to the behind-the-scenes chatter of school owners in my area and all over the country. And I can say without a shadow of a doubt that the conclusion of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) that there is "overwhelming documentation of exorbitant tuition, aggressive recruiting practices, abysmal student outcomes, taxpayer dollars spent on marketing and pocketed as profit, and regulatory evasion and manipulation" is an understatement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2009 | Sandy Banks
If you're the parent of a child aiming to attend a California State University campus next fall, you might want to give him or her a nudge this morning. Today is the deadline for Cal State applications, and overloaded admissions officers are expecting a last-minute flood. In years past, the deadline was a flexible one, in keeping with the state's mission to allow all eligible students to enroll in one of the campuses, considered the middle rung between community colleges and our flagship UC system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
An effort to overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public universities stalled in the Legislature on Monday. The proposed constitutional amendment by Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina) would have removed references to higher education from Proposition 209, an initiative passed by voters in 1996 that bans consideration by government institutions  of race, ethnicity and sex in hiring, school admissions and contracting. The amendment, SCA 5, passed the Senate in January on a party-line vote.
OPINION
December 27, 2010 | By Erwin Chemerinsky
The proposals for the University of California now being considered in Sacramento ? limiting tuition and fees, freezing executive and faculty salaries and increasing legislative control over the UCs ? are well intentioned. But they are a recipe for ruining a great public university system. A public university has only three choices: It can be subsidized by the state, it can raise tuition and fees to make up needed revenue, or it can be mediocre. Without adequate revenue, faculties will shrink, meaning fewer and larger classes; the quality of faculty teaching and research will diminish; programs and facilities will be inadequate for education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Jason Song
More than 100 colleges and universities, including several in California, promised Thursday to try to attract more low-income students by strengthening relationships with high schools and community colleges, increasing access to advisors and offering more remedial programs. The pledges came after President Obama made increased college accessibility one of his top goals. On Thursday, the president invited to the White House participants who have made commitments to further that effort.
OPINION
October 9, 2012 | By Lee C. Bollinger and Claude M. Steele
There are good reasons the Wednesday argument before the Supreme Court in the case called Fisher vs. University of Texas has prompted more than the usual amount of speculation about the intentions of the justices and the case's likely outcome. For higher education and, we believe, American society at large, the stakes could not be higher. Abigail Fisher's claim that the University of Texas unconstitutionally considered race in assembling its incoming undergraduate class - resulting, she argues, in her exclusion from the student body - reengages one of the most consequential legal and moral debates in American history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2011 | By Carla Rivera and Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Decrying what they called an assault on higher education, thousands of faculty and students at California State University campuses across the state rallied, marched and held teach-ins Wednesday to protest steep funding cuts and rising tuition. Dubbed the Day of Class Action, events were held on all 23 Cal State campuses, featuring speakers, workshops, gospel singers, guerrilla theater and, on one campus, a New Orleans-style "funeral" march. The protests were largely peaceful and there were no reports of disruptions, although student groups staged sit-ins in hallways outside the offices of presidents Jolene Koester at Cal State Northridge and James M. Rosser at Cal State L.A. No arrests were made, and students left the buildings by the end of the day. Peaceful sit-ins were also held at campuses in Pomona, San Francisco and the East Bay. With education funding at risk and higher tuition possible in many states, students and faculty at public universities elsewhere also held rallies and teach-ins Wednesday, including at Portland State in Oregon, Rutgers University in New Jersey and the University of Massachusetts' Boston campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995
My letter is in regard to the economic situation in which I find myself and many young Americans my age. I am a 22-year-old Moorpark College student. Part of the reason I chose to attend a junior college is because I could not afford to pay for my general education at a four-year university. I am at this time still living at home. This is a big problem for many young adults who find themselves unable to attain higher education and want to leave the house and lead a life of their own. My parents often tell me that at my age they had been married a year and had a child (and)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Carla Rivera and Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown's proposals to slash state spending on higher education has triggered anxiety across California's already budget-battered public colleges and universities about possible new waves of staff and faculty layoffs, reductions in class offerings and higher tuition bills. Administrators said it was too soon to say definitively how they would respond if the Legislature approves the $1.4 billion in proposed state funding cuts for the University of California, California State University and the state's community college system.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By Karthick Ramakrishnan
Is the debate on affirmative action versus race-blind policies mainly about principle, or mostly about preserving narrow group interests? We are beginning to find out in California. A bill passed by the state Senate and pending in the Assembly would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would overturn portions of Proposition 209 to exempt public college and university admissions from the ban on racial, ethnic and gender preferences. There are principled reasons to support as well as to oppose affirmative action in higher education.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Colleague Don Lee wrote a piece in Tuesday's L.A. Times about a new Pew Research Center study, "The Rising Cost of Not Going to College ," that finds getting a college education is still the best path to a financially successful life, the current economy notwithstanding. Of course, no one - especially poll takers, who measure the present and the past - can predict the future. But the Pew findings are pretty compelling, even as they obscure a more significant point: The benefits of a higher education aren't limited to a paycheck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO - The leaders of California's three public higher education systems Wednesday pledged more cooperation, particularly in transferring students, while Gov. Jerry Brown urged them to develop more innovative collaborations. In a rare gathering, University of California President Janet Napolitano, California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White and California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice W. Harris said they want to break through some of the walls set up by the state's 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education, which established different roles and student enrollment criteria for each sector.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Jason Song
More than 100 colleges and universities, including several in California, promised Thursday to try to attract more low-income students by strengthening relationships with high schools and community colleges, increasing access to advisors and offering more remedial programs. The pledges came after President Obama made increased college accessibility one of his top goals. On Thursday, the president invited to the White House participants who have made commitments to further that effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Californians will get the first chance to comment on President Obama's proposals to make college more affordable during a public forum this week at Cal State Dominguez Hills, officials said. The Wednesday event is the first in a series of four public sessions held around the country - and the only one in California - to gather input on the president's recently announced agenda to develop a college ratings system to help students select schools with the best bang for their buck. "Higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility in America," Obama said in August during a kickoff campaign at the University of Buffalo.
OPINION
October 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The California Master Plan for Higher Education decreed that it was the job of the state's community colleges to train students for technical careers and for the sort of semi-professional occupations that generally require a two-year associate's degree. Those who wanted a bachelor's degree - and the sort of jobs that go with one - could move on to either California State University or the University of California. But the master plan was written during the postwar baby boom, and like many of us who were born back then, it's beginning to develop wrinkles.
OPINION
April 17, 2011 | By Gene Block
Early this year I was asked, as the chancellor at UCLA, to prepare the campus for nearly $100 million in budget cuts. It was our share of the $500-million reduction proposed for the University of California system in Gov. Jerry Brown's budget proposal. And that's the good news. As we all know, more extreme reductions lie ahead because of the state's budgetary crisis and political stalemate. The governor has attempted to forestall those further reductions by asking voters to approve extensions of several state taxes, taxes that Californians already pay. Thus far, there are not enough legislators to support putting the extensions up for a vote on the June ballot.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- This year's Nobel Prize in chemistry struck a bittersweet chord in Israel -- a mix of pride for home-grown achievement and concern for the future of the nation's higher education and scientific research. Two of the three laureates for the prize announced Wednesday, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel, conducted a considerable part of their research in Israel's leading scientific institutes. But by the time they gained Nobel recognition , they had long since shifted most of their work to the U.S. despite strong family ties in Israel.
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