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Higher Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2009 | Larry Gordon,Gale Holland and mitchell landsberg
California's master plan for higher education, the product of an era of seemingly limitless opportunity, was nearly 30 years old when Nicolette Lafranchi was born in 1988. By the time she turned 20 last year, the plan was working well for her, just as it had for tens of millions of students before her. That's less true now.
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OPINION
July 12, 2013 | By Nicholas B. Dirks
Under the leadership of Gov. Edmund G. "Pat" Brown and University of California President Clark Kerr, the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education in California created a unique three-way collaboration between the university, the public and the state, a partnership that propelled the state to the forefront of scientific discovery, the arts, innovation and economic growth. At the core of that partnership was the idea of access. As Kerr noted, it was the first time in history "that a state or a nation would promise there would be a place ready for every high school graduate or person otherwise qualified.
OPINION
January 3, 2010
Education frustration Re "Restoring a gem's luster," Editorial, Dec. 28 My wife and I are both proud graduates of Cal State universities. The state gave us a fine education, and we are now repaying this by teaching handicapped children in the public schools. My son will graduate from community college in June, and he will then pursue his bachelor's degree as a transfer student. Should he apply to a CSU or a UC? Sadly, my advice is "neither." With California's educational gold gone, I've told him, "Go east, young man, go east."
OPINION
April 5, 2006
Re "A 'free' Harvard? Now that's rich," Current, April 2 Catharine Hill and Gordon Winston argue that it would be ridiculous to allow all students to attend Harvard for free because it would simply be a giveaway to the rich. When our daughter attended Stanford from 1997 to 1999, our primary mode of paying for her attendance came from loans -- student loans and parent loans, which we and our daughter are still paying with some difficulty despite the fact that our daughter decided to leave Stanford, partly because of the cost of attending.
OPINION
October 2, 2006
Re "Education Secretary Has Collegiate Shake-Up in Mind," Sept. 27 Education Secretary Margaret Spellings says she wants a broad shake-up of higher education. This comes from the head of a growing bureaucracy that has forced No Child Left Behind on the nation's schools since early in the first Bush term in office. This federal program has been run just about like other federal programs, which are manifestly ineffective and managed by incompetent people. Anyone wondering what would happen under a federal school system now has the answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1986
Anne Roark's article (May 1) on the deliberations of the Commission for Review of the Master Plan for Higher Education, and the letter from Chancellor-emeritus Glenn Dumke of the California State University (May 10) raise some very important issues regarding relationships between the University of California and the other segments of higher education in California. Dumke reminds us that it was the original intent of the 1960 master plan that functions be divided so that money appropriated for higher education might be used as efficiently as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1985
I would like to comment on your editorial (Sept. 27), "Taking Off on Higher Education." The principal issues facing higher education in this country involve its quality standards and its accessibility to students who would benefit from the experience. There is danger if, in the dialogues to come, we focus on either issue to the exclusion of the other. These concerns are dealt with, though not with the prominence they deserve, in the report prepared by President Frank Newman of the Education Commission of the States and issued by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
California's public higher education leaders warned Monday that additional tuition increases could be in store this fall if legislators or voters reject Gov. Jerry Brown's plan to extend several recent tax hikes. And even if the tax proposal is approved, the educators said, they expect some academic programs to be eliminated next year. University of California President Mark G. Yudof, California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed and California Community Colleges Chancellor Jack Scott appeared before a state legislative panel in Sacramento to discuss Brown's plan to cut $1.4 billion from higher education funding.
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