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Higher Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1992 | NANCY LUNA, Nancy Luna is a communications major at Cal State Fullerton and city editor of CSUF's Daily Titan newspaper
Fee increases on top of fee increases at Cal State and UC campuses will cost society even more than it will students. Higher education is suffering and the victims are the students. While students in the California State University system still feel the crunch from this year's 20% fee increase, what does Gov. Pete Wilson do? He proposes an additional 40% increase in student fees in the fall. The University of California did not have much luck either.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lowering interest rates on students loans captured most of the attention earlier this month when President Clinton signed a bill that revisited federal higher education programs for the first time since 1992. But Congress tucked a few other things into the bill's 668 pages. Take campus crime, for example. Congress stripped colleges of some of the artful dodges used to keep criminal activity--and the results of campus disciplinary proceedings--from public view. Or consider teacher training.
OPINION
March 20, 1994 | GEOFFREY MARTIN, Geoffrey Martin is a senior journalism student at the University of Southern California
When the Western Assn. of Schools and Colleges recently approved a revised "statement on diversity," it crossed over from its traditional role of evaluating a curriculum's minimum standards into one of mandating what should be taught in the classroom. In effect, the association wants to enforce a multicultural code. In so doing, it is violating the autonomy of scholastic programs and infringing upon students' right to choose their courses. Donald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2001
Lyman Glenny, 83, who built UC Berkeley's Center for the Study of Higher Education into the nation's leading authority on what colleges and universities should be doing, died of bone cancer Sept. 6 in Walnut Creek, Calif. In an era of expansive growth to provide higher education for baby boomers, Glenny wrote influential studies on such problems as planning, budgeting, management, programming, student financial aid and educational quality. Born in Trent, S.D.
NEWS
November 30, 1989
The League of Women Voters will sponsor a meeting Saturday addressing questions related to the need for higher education in Ventura County. The meeting, consisting of a panel of six speakers, will last from 10 a.m. to noon at Community Presbyterian Church, 115 Lincoln Drive, in Ventura.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An independent report on higher education flunks most states when it comes to affordability. It gives better but mixed grades in other areas, such as college participation and completion rates. The biennial study by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education being released today evaluates how well higher education is serving the public -- and leaves little doubt where the system is failing. Forty-three states received Fs for affordability, up from 36 two years ago.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1996 | J. Eugene Grisgby III, J. Eugene Grisgby III is director of UCLA's Center for Afro-American Studies and a professor in the university's School of Public Policy and Social Research
The nation's colleges and universities play essential and critical roles in American society. In addition to transmitting fundamental cultural values, colleges and universities are crucial to continued economic growth and development. Rapid innovations in electronic technology, medicine, law and engineering can be traced directly to scholars and students studying and working in many of our teaching and research institutions.
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