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Higher Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2013 | Anthony York, Michael J. Mishak, Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
Public schools California's K-12 schools are among the biggest winners in the governor's budget, with a proposed funding increase of $2.7 billion. The money would come with plans to shift some of it away from wealthy suburban districts so it can be spent on schools that serve poor students and non-English speakers. But those receiving less money than in the past would have more flexibility in spending it, because Gov. Jerry Brown's plan would eliminate dozens of program requirements set by Sacramento.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
As chancellor of California State University, Charles B. Reed became a symbol of the problems and the promise of the massive public higher education system. He has received national recognition for his efforts to increase the number of underserved students - low income, minorities, veterans - and for steering the country's largest four-year university system through a period of crippling budget cuts at a time of large enrollment growth. He has been mocked in effigy by students critical of rapidly increasing tuition and slammed by lawmakers for granting executive pay hikes as others in the system were forced to tighten belts.
OPINION
October 14, 2012 | By David N. Myers
In August 2009, an Israeli academic and political activist by the name of Neve Gordon published an Op-Ed article in the Los Angeles Times in which he reluctantly called for a gradual international boycott against his own nation. Gordon felt that such dramatic action was required to overcome the deep structural inequities between Jews and Arabs in Israeli society and the occupied territories, and to force the government back toward the goal of a two-state solution. Three years later, Gordon's academic home, the Department of Politics and Government of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, is on the verge of being closed down by the Israeli Council for Higher Education, a highly unusual act in Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The following are edited excerpts from telephone interviews and email exchanges with leading education analysts, writers and researchers regarding the policies and positions of the presidential candidates. Michelle Rhee Chief executive, StudentsFirst; former chancellor, District of Columbia Public Schools Both support expanding educational options for families. President Obama did this, for example, by encouraging states to get rid of unnecessary caps on public charter schools through Race to the Top [grants]
OPINION
October 9, 2012 | By Lee C. Bollinger and Claude M. Steele
There are good reasons the Wednesday argument before the Supreme Court in the case called Fisher vs. University of Texas has prompted more than the usual amount of speculation about the intentions of the justices and the case's likely outcome. For higher education and, we believe, American society at large, the stakes could not be higher. Abigail Fisher's claim that the University of Texas unconstitutionally considered race in assembling its incoming undergraduate class - resulting, she argues, in her exclusion from the student body - reengages one of the most consequential legal and moral debates in American history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
An immigrant and first-generation college student who rose through the ranks of California's public higher education system was named Thursday to lead the sprawling California State University as it wrestles with critical academic and budget issues. The Board of Trustees announced that Timothy P. White, 63, currently chancellor of UC Riverside, will succeed Charles B. Reed, who is retiring after 14 years at the helm. White will become the seventh chancellor of the nation's largest four-year university system with 23 campuses and 427,000 students.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Laura Desfor Edles
I was disturbed but not surprised to read that central to retiring California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed's " new Master Plan ," as he wrote in his Times Op-Ed article last Tuesday, is a push for "year-round, online" education. As a full-time professor at Cal State Northridge, I am getting a bit worn out by this push (or should I say "shove"). What bothers me most about Reed's promotion of online education as part of the state's Master Plan for Higher Education is his absolute lack of candor.
OPINION
September 11, 2012 | By Charles B. Reed
California's public higher education system, once the envy of the world, is struggling. To survive in a way that continues to fulfill its mission, we need to break the mold on how it operates. State budget cuts have stripped our universities to the bone. And the promise of nearly free, accessible higher education has all but disappeared as cuts have forced tuition increases. What was once a rite of passage for all qualified young people is increasingly becoming untenable for many prospective students.
OPINION
August 26, 2012 | Peter Schrag, Peter Schrag, a former editorial page editor of the Sacramento Bee, is the author of "Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America."
The University of California's plea to the U.S. Supreme Court, filed earlier this month, to uphold race-based affirmative action in college admissions is -- in effect -- a confession of failure. UC's plea comes in an amicus brief in a crucial case challenging affirmative action at the University of Texas. If the court declares the Texas policy unconstitutional, as it well may, it would mark the end of affirmative action in all public higher education in America and, just possibly, for any private institution getting federal funds.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama on Tuesday kicks off a new campaign push on the issue of education, part of an effort to highlight how a budget proposal offered in Congress by GOP vice presidential pick Paul Ryan would affect key areas beyond Medicare. Ryan's proposals have been the focus of skirmishing since Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney added the Wisconsin lawmaker to the ticket.   Obama is returning to college campuses to make that pitch to voters in crucial states at both ends of the country, Capital University in Columbus, Ohio, and Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno.
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