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Higher Standards

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OPINION
June 6, 2002
Re "Value of Standardized Tests," editorial, May 31: In order to generate the comparisons in student performance that you claim are indispensable for judging educational quality, standardized test-makers need to create differences among student scores. If test-makers included only items measuring the most important content emphasized by teachers, scores might be too similar, making comparisons unsatisfactory. To engineer score spread, test-makers build into standardized tests items assessing content that is highly unlikely to be taught in class.
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SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The Clippers have never won more games in a season. They've also never been better at home. All of which may not mean much depending on how the next few months go. There was no denying that the Clippers' 117-105 triumph over the Denver Nuggets on Tuesday night at Staples Center gave them franchise records of 57 victories and 34 home wins in the same season. BOX SCORE: Clippers 117, Nuggets 105 Of course, those aren't the ultimate goals for a team seeking to make it past the second round of the playoffs for the first time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2000
Despite some misgivings, the Los Angeles City Council adopted new voter-approved rules Tuesday that set higher standards that the council must meet before it can censure its members. Currently, the 15-member council can censure a member for any reason as long as there are eight votes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
When "The Mindy Project" premiered on Fox in fall 2012, it was widely hailed as a breakthrough in the diversity of mainstream television. Its star, Mindy Kaling, who plays a romantically challenged obstetrician in a New York hospital, became the first woman of color to create, helm and star in a successful sitcom on a major network. But even as the broadcast networks overall are showcasing more minority actors in scripted programming than ever, Kaling is facing mounting criticism that her own sitcom isn't diverse enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992 | Dr. HERBERT L. CARTER, Millions of needy people may be hurt because of allegations of mismanagement and poor judgment leveled against the national United Way, according to Dr. HERBERT L. CARTER, president and chief executive officer of United Way of Greater Los Angeles. The local's board of directors will continue to withhold funds from the national office until an independent investigation is completed and the results meet the local's satisfaction. According to Carter:
Ethics is emerging as an issue of paramount concern. This applies not only to political candidates and business executives, but to those of us in the nonprofit sector as well. Today, nonprofit organizations must remind themselves that their operations are held up to higher standards than ever before, and that charitable contributions are voluntary and dependent upon the goodwill of individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1987 | ANTHONY PERRY, Times Staff Writer
Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Alfred M. Gray Jr. delivered a blunt message Tuesday during a whirlwind trip to the Navy's amphibious base on Coronado: Marine training is going to be tougher and more realistic. During an hourlong discussion with the press, and an informal address to 300 officers and enlisted personnel, the 59-year-old veteran of Korea and Vietnam stressed the need for more combat training and higher standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anticipating tougher building standards in the wake of the Northridge earthquake, the Los Angeles City Council laid the groundwork Wednesday to grant city officials the authority to impose building codes tougher than those currently on the books. The interim power to impose higher standards would go to the head of the Building and Safety Department under legislation the council ordered to be drawn up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
Parents believe the educational standards movement is improving the teaching of math and reading in public schools, according to a national survey by the nonpartisan research group Public Agenda. In its fourth annual survey on the effect of the national effort to raise standards, the New York-based group found that parents see a significant change and now rate public schools about the same as private schools.
OPINION
July 14, 2006
Re "Who makes the cut?" editorial, July 11 There is no difference between a Utah video store selling an edited movie and networks broadcasting an edited movie. Hollywood always has had a vendetta against Utah, the Deep South and other Bible Belt areas that demand higher standards. That a federal judge in Colorado took Hollywood's side likely means the judge has rubbed too many shoulders at the Aspen Film Festival. BOB MUNSON Newbury Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994
I would like to bring attention to the current . . . initiative that is under way to recall Ventura City Councilwoman Rosa Lee Measures. Regardless of how any individual feels about Ms. Measures, this recall is really about taking responsible action in our community. It is about letting elected officials know that we remember and still care about those things they promised us at election time. The recall is about demanding fair and unbiased decisions on issues that involve millions of dollars and affect the entire community.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After a series of fiery crashes involving trains hauling crude oil, the railroad industry called on the federal government Thursday to significantly strengthen safety standards for new tank cars and require retrofitting of the nation's huge fleet of existing tankers. Tank car safety has taken on greater urgency as the oil industry turns to rail to ship the massive increases in oil production that are occurring in shale fields not served by major pipelines, including North Dakota, Colorado and south Texas.
SPORTS
August 10, 2011 | Wire reports
NCAA leaders are ready to give college sports an overhaul. They want to simplify the 439-page Division I rulebook, enforce stronger penalties for rule-breakers, increase academic standards and link academic performance to possible postseason bans. And if NCAA President Mark Emmert gets his way, all of this would be approved in the next 12 months. "What's different is a lot of things have reached a boiling point," Penn State President Graham Spanier said after Emmert's two-day presidential retreat wrapped up Wednesday in Indianapolis.
SPORTS
September 1, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
Torii Hunter knew of Scott Kazmir's All-Star credentials and was aware of the left-hander's impressive track record against the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, both potential playoff opponents in the fall. But the center fielder used a different standard to assess the trade Friday that brought Kazmir, 25, from Tampa Bay to the Angels for three prospects. "I don't like facing him," said Hunter, who has a .267 average (four for 15) with no home runs and no runs batted in against Kazmir.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists want you to buy organic roses, and human rights groups tout conflict-free diamonds. Now, just in time for Valentine's Day, jewelry retailers are stepping up a campaign that aims to discourage the mining and sale of "dirty gold." A group of prominent jewelers including Tiffany & Co.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Congress has avoided upgrading fuel efficiency standards for new vehicles during the last two decades. With $3-a-gallon-plus gasoline prices and global warming, however, there may be a new outlook on Capitol Hill. The leaders of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Group received a dose of reality Wednesday, when some Democrats told them to prepare for changes. The industry worries that tough, new standards could add to the burdens of recent job losses and plant closings.
OPINION
November 6, 2006
Re "Success? That's not an elective," Column One, Nov. 2 My heart was racing as I read this article. Jordan High School Principal Stephen Strachan's unapologetic and innovative approach to raising education standards is courageous and necessary. Strachan makes it clear that if inner-city children are to be successful, they need a quality education, a support system and higher standards. These children simply need a sustained community of dedicated people to make a moral investment in their lives.
SPORTS
October 24, 1996 | Associated Press
Getting D-minuses in class is nothing to be proud of, but neither is losing, 55-0, to rival River Rouge. So the Inkster school district has lowered its academic standards for athletes, abandoning after only three years a policy that allowed students to play sports only if they passed six classes with a C or better. Because of the higher standards, the Inkster baseball team had to forfeit its 1993 season, and this year's football team, with only 15 eligible players, is 1-6 with two games left.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | MARIAN BERGESON, Marian Bergeson is secretary of child development and education in the Wilson administration
In "Public Education: California's Perilous Slide," the Los Angeles Times documents in compelling--for some people, shocking--detail the multitude of problems that have spurred the decline of our educational system and, more important, the dreadful academic performance levels of our students. None of this information should be surprising to those who have witnessed the downward turn our schools have taken over the years. For Gov.
OPINION
July 14, 2006
Re "Who makes the cut?" editorial, July 11 There is no difference between a Utah video store selling an edited movie and networks broadcasting an edited movie. Hollywood always has had a vendetta against Utah, the Deep South and other Bible Belt areas that demand higher standards. That a federal judge in Colorado took Hollywood's side likely means the judge has rubbed too many shoulders at the Aspen Film Festival. BOB MUNSON Newbury Park
NATIONAL
May 10, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
In a sign of the political recalibrations sparked by high gasoline costs, senators Tuesday urged representatives of the auto industry and labor -- two powerful interest groups -- to back efforts to raise fuel efficiency standards that they have resisted for years. The lawmakers also grilled Secretary of Transportation Norman Y.
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