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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gasping for breath in thin air, watching clouds congeal on a jagged southern horizon, Elliot Boston wasted only a few moments in savoring his victory. He stood alone on the rocky peak of Aconcagua, the highest point in the Western Hemisphere, and knew he was closing in on a dream. The 22,835-foot slab of Andean rock and ice loomed high above anything he had climbed before--half a mile above his last big climb, Mt. Elbrus in Russia. But in mountaineering, triumph is rarely a clean emotion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lornet Turnbull
Chad Kellogg, an elite alpinist who climbed some of the world's highest and most challenging peaks - charging up mountains and breaking records for the fastest ascents - was killed Feb. 14 while descending Mt. Fitz Roy, a prominent peak in the Patagonia region of Argentina. He was 42. Kellogg, a Seattle resident, and his climbing partner Jens Holsten, of Leavenworth, Wash., had successfully summited the 11,000-foot mountain and were hanging together from a preestablished anchor when a rock fell, striking Kellogg and killing him instantly.
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TRAVEL
July 27, 1986
I would like to offer a correction to the July 13 article on traveling to Expo, written by Anne and Paul W. Cooke. They mentioned "Mt. Rainier, highest mountain in the contiguous 48 states." Mt. Whitney in California tops it. ELEANOR FARRELL Arcadia
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google is continuing to push the limits of its Street View technology, this time by adding images in some of the highest points on the planet. In a series of expeditions by Google employees throughout 2011 and 2012, the company was able to add Street View images for four of the Seven Summits -- the tallest mountains on each of the seven continents. QUIZ: How much do you know about   Google ? Google captured the parts of Mount Everest in Asia and the summits of Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, Mount Elbrus in Europe and Aconcagua , the highest mountain in South America.  The Street View panorama for Aconcagua summit, which is now the highest point viewable on Street View at more than 22,800 feet in elevation, can be seen below.
TRAVEL
April 16, 2000 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
A group of San Francisco Bay Area climbing buddies have left for Mt. Everest, planning to spend nearly two months hauling out at least 6,000 pounds of debris from camps on the world's highest mountain. Although only about 1,000 climbers have reached the 29,028-foot peak, more than 280,000 have attempted it. The tons of garbage they left behind range from oxygen tanks to instant noodle packages.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google is continuing to push the limits of its Street View technology, this time by adding images in some of the highest points on the planet. In a series of expeditions by Google employees throughout 2011 and 2012, the company was able to add Street View images for four of the Seven Summits -- the tallest mountains on each of the seven continents. QUIZ: How much do you know about   Google ? Google captured the parts of Mount Everest in Asia and the summits of Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, Mount Elbrus in Europe and Aconcagua , the highest mountain in South America.  The Street View panorama for Aconcagua summit, which is now the highest point viewable on Street View at more than 22,800 feet in elevation, can be seen below.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lornet Turnbull
Chad Kellogg, an elite alpinist who climbed some of the world's highest and most challenging peaks - charging up mountains and breaking records for the fastest ascents - was killed Feb. 14 while descending Mt. Fitz Roy, a prominent peak in the Patagonia region of Argentina. He was 42. Kellogg, a Seattle resident, and his climbing partner Jens Holsten, of Leavenworth, Wash., had successfully summited the 11,000-foot mountain and were hanging together from a preestablished anchor when a rock fell, striking Kellogg and killing him instantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1986 | United Press International
Two members of an American-led expedition made the first U.S. conquest of the 26,906-foot Cho Oyu, the world's sixth highest peak, Nepal's Ministry of Tourism said Monday. James Frush, 34, of Trinidad, Colo., and David Hambly, 52, the sole British member of the team from Redmond, Wash., climbed the peak from the southwest side. They planted American, Nepalese and British flags on the summit, the ministry said. The team is preparing for an autumn, 1988, assault on Mt.
NEWS
January 19, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Climbers said Friday that they have discovered a frozen human body in what appears to be an ancient Inca shrine high on the slopes of the hemisphere's highest mountain. "We don't know exactly what it is. An expedition of scientists is going up next week to find out," said Felix Fellinger, president of the local mountaineering club in this western Argentine city in the Andean foothills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001
Whether they are above ground or below the ocean's surface, mountains not only reveal the continually shifting nature of the Earth, they also profoundly affect weather conditions, contain diverse wildlife and ecosystems and have even influenced human history and economics by determining trade routes and providing natural resources.
NEWS
October 11, 2005 | Ann Japenga, Special to The Times
THE trip to the top of Mt. San Jacinto is as easy as hopping into a gondola via the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway and soaring one vertical mile above granite escarpments, lodgepole pines and waterfalls spilling into gorges choked with wild grapevines. It's a slice of the Sierra and prelude to a challenging hiking path with a controversial future.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | Joe Robinson, Times Staff Writer
The lung-busting is finally over. Ed Viesturs' long-running quest to become the first American to climb all 14 of the world's 8,000-meter peaks -- 26,240 feet and higher -- ended in triumph May 12 when he topped his arch nemesis, avalanche-belching Annapurna. It was a last act fit for a drama primer.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | NED MUNGER
Mt. Kilimanjaro is located on the equator. When Europeans first saw the mountain in 1848, they reported snow at the top. They were not believed. How could there be snow in such a hot place as the equator? Geographers said the white stuff must be salt deposited by the dormant volcano. They didn't know that the higher the altitude, the colder the air, even at the equator! As Julie, Carl, and Uncle Bill walked around Moshi in the morning, the air was crisp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gasping for breath in thin air, watching clouds congeal on a jagged southern horizon, Elliot Boston wasted only a few moments in savoring his victory. He stood alone on the rocky peak of Aconcagua, the highest point in the Western Hemisphere, and knew he was closing in on a dream. The 22,835-foot slab of Andean rock and ice loomed high above anything he had climbed before--half a mile above his last big climb, Mt. Elbrus in Russia. But in mountaineering, triumph is rarely a clean emotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001
Whether they are above ground or below the ocean's surface, mountains not only reveal the continually shifting nature of the Earth, they also profoundly affect weather conditions, contain diverse wildlife and ecosystems and have even influenced human history and economics by determining trade routes and providing natural resources.
TRAVEL
April 16, 2000 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
A group of San Francisco Bay Area climbing buddies have left for Mt. Everest, planning to spend nearly two months hauling out at least 6,000 pounds of debris from camps on the world's highest mountain. Although only about 1,000 climbers have reached the 29,028-foot peak, more than 280,000 have attempted it. The tons of garbage they left behind range from oxygen tanks to instant noodle packages.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | Joe Robinson, Times Staff Writer
The lung-busting is finally over. Ed Viesturs' long-running quest to become the first American to climb all 14 of the world's 8,000-meter peaks -- 26,240 feet and higher -- ended in triumph May 12 when he topped his arch nemesis, avalanche-belching Annapurna. It was a last act fit for a drama primer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before Christmas, Jennifer Lambelet Mencken had hoisted a holiday flag in front of her Spanish-style house in Long Beach. The small red banner with white letters read, "JOY." Friends on Wednesday, remembering the Los Angeles librarian, said that message expressed a lot about Mencken's love for life and her devotion to mountain climbing. Before she departed on what would be her last hiking adventure, to Mt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Imax documentary "Everest," a multinational team of climbers reaches the summit of the world's highest mountain in May 1996, just after an unexpected storm took the lives of eight others. (Not rated.) After assessing the thrills of ice climbing, thundering avalanches and panoramas of frozen peaks under a royal blue sky, 3-year-old Hannah Campbell decided she'd rather chew her foam soft-drink cup.
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