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Highland Federal Savings Loan Of Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991
In an effort to keep a Highland Park-based savings and loan as a defendant in the city's large civil suit against slumlords and their lenders, the Los Angeles city attorney filed a notice of appeal to challenge a Superior Court ruling removing Highland Federal Savings and Loan from the case. Last January, Judge Barnet M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A savings and loan firm accused of operating a network of slum buildings in Los Angeles will have to face trial on racketeering, fraud and other charges, a state appeals court has ruled. Highland Federal Bank was a principal defendant in a landmark 1989 suit filed by the city attorney and public interest lawyers, contending that slum conditions in several inner-city buildings had been created by sham ownerships and fraudulent loans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit that charges Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn. with conspiring with landlords to siphon profits from slums is "a bunch of hogwash--and you can put that in capital letters," the president of Highland Federal asserted Friday. "The city attorney made a mistake--a big mistake," Ben Karmelich said. "Highland Federal and myself are innocent of everything they charge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991
In an effort to keep a Highland Park-based savings and loan as a defendant in the city's large civil suit against slumlords and their lenders, the Los Angeles city attorney filed a notice of appeal to challenge a Superior Court ruling removing Highland Federal Savings and Loan from the case. Last January, Judge Barnet M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A & B Loan Co., accused of racketeering in connection with financing some of Los Angeles' worst slum buildings, filed a motion Wednesday to have the lawsuit against it and more than 130 other defendants moved from Superior Court to federal court. Max Greenberg, an attorney for the Inglewood-based lending institution, and its co-owner, Alexander Spitzer, said a notice of removal was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A savings and loan firm accused of operating a network of slum buildings in Los Angeles will have to face trial on racketeering, fraud and other charges, a state appeals court has ruled. Highland Federal Bank was a principal defendant in a landmark 1989 suit filed by the city attorney and public interest lawyers, contending that slum conditions in several inner-city buildings had been created by sham ownerships and fraudulent loans.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A group of Inglewood loan companies signed an unprecedented agreement with Los Angeles on Wednesday in which they promised to change their lending policies and force borrowers to repair slum buildings--or face losing them. The agreement marks a partial settlement of a landmark civil lawsuit filed by the city in March that accused 146 defendants of fraud and racketeering in connection with their investments in 11 of the city's worst slum properties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles real estate investor who told The Times that his signature had been forged on two deeds notarized by Ben Karmelich, president of Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn., has changed his mind and signed an affidavit saying the signatures were genuine after all. "Upon checking my records, there was absolutely no fraud or forgery," Syed Mouzzam Ali said in the sworn statement. "I signed the two deeds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that dealt a severe setback to a landmark civil racketeering suit against slumlords and their lenders, a Superior Court judge said Wednesday that a Los Angeles federal savings and loan cannot be sued by the Los Angeles city attorney for its lending practices on slum properties. Judge Barnet M.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn., a 21-year-old thrift with 10 local branches, is the lender of first--and sometimes last--resort for some of the city's worst slumlords. Its president, Ben Karmelich, and board of directors have repeatedly made exceptions to their own lending policies to give large, sometimes risky loans to slumlords, their companies and their agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after his office was dealt a severe setback in a dramatic bid to hold lenders responsible for slum conditions fueled by fraudulent loans, the Los Angeles city attorney vowed to ask federal regulators to participate in the crackdown. City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that dealt a severe setback to a landmark civil racketeering suit against slumlords and their lenders, a Superior Court judge said Wednesday that a Los Angeles federal savings and loan cannot be sued by the Los Angeles city attorney for its lending practices on slum properties. Judge Barnet M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles real estate investor who told The Times that his signature had been forged on two deeds notarized by Ben Karmelich, president of Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn., has changed his mind and signed an affidavit saying the signatures were genuine after all. "Upon checking my records, there was absolutely no fraud or forgery," Syed Mouzzam Ali said in the sworn statement. "I signed the two deeds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A variety of federal and state officials are reviewing the activities of a network of Los Angeles slum financiers to determine whether any of them has engaged in criminal conduct or violated civil law, officials said Wednesday. The U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
The portable telephone that Mordehai Ben-Horin perpetually grips in his right hand is not for show. Ben-Horin is a talker. Whether he's conducting a tour of the aging brick Cameo residential hotel, which he owns, or just holding a conversation, "Senor Ben," as he is known to his tenants, presses on nonstop. The one-sided discourse jumps from the philosophy of Socrates to the disdain his ex-wife feels for the architecture of low-income apartments.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn., a 21-year-old thrift with 10 local branches, is the lender of first--and sometimes last--resort for some of the city's worst slumlords. Its president, Ben Karmelich, and board of directors have repeatedly made exceptions to their own lending policies to give large, sometimes risky loans to slumlords, their companies and their agents.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
The portable telephone that Mordehai Ben-Horin perpetually grips in his right hand is not for show. Ben-Horin is a talker. Whether he's conducting a tour of the aging brick Cameo residential hotel, which he owns, or just holding a conversation, "Senor Ben," as he is known to his tenants, presses on nonstop. The one-sided discourse jumps from the philosophy of Socrates to the disdain his ex-wife feels for the architecture of low-income apartments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after his office was dealt a severe setback in a dramatic bid to hold lenders responsible for slum conditions fueled by fraudulent loans, the Los Angeles city attorney vowed to ask federal regulators to participate in the crackdown. City Atty. James K.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A group of Inglewood loan companies signed an unprecedented agreement with Los Angeles on Wednesday in which they promised to change their lending policies and force borrowers to repair slum buildings--or face losing them. The agreement marks a partial settlement of a landmark civil lawsuit filed by the city in March that accused 146 defendants of fraud and racketeering in connection with their investments in 11 of the city's worst slum properties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A & B Loan Co., accused of racketeering in connection with financing some of Los Angeles' worst slum buildings, filed a motion Wednesday to have the lawsuit against it and more than 130 other defendants moved from Superior Court to federal court. Max Greenberg, an attorney for the Inglewood-based lending institution, and its co-owner, Alexander Spitzer, said a notice of removal was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
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