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Highway 99

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The highway that cleaves this valley will never make the list of most scenic, though the pink and white flowers planted along its spine just might be the biggest collection of oleanders in the world. Highway 99 runs straight up the gut of California, from Weedpatch to Red Bluff, through 450 miles of industrial farms and beaten-up towns and wannabe big cities. With the rivers dammed and lakes drained dry, no feature on the Central Valley map quite throbs with life as 99 does.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Federal regulators have initiated an investigation into whether a local tour bus company should be immediately shut down after one of its buses crashed in the Central Valley, sending 15 passengers to the hospital. Marissa Padilla, a spokeswoman for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, said the agency is working with the California Highway Patrol to investigate the cause of Monday's crash. The bus operator, Huntington Park-based Fronteras del Norte, has logged more than 200 safety violations relating to vehicle maintenance over the last two years, ranging from a broken cab door to defective brakes and insufficient emergency exits, according to records with the FMCSA.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State transportation officials broke ground on a $62-million project to widen a 6-mile stretch of California Highway 99 south of Fresno, from Selma to Kingsburg. The increasingly congested four-lane highway will be expanded to six lanes. Completion is expected by 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
FRESNO - What is old, and even older, will unite to return a roadside attraction in the shape of a giant orange to Highway 99. The San Joaquin Valley Paleontology Foundation, which runs the Fossil Discovery Center of Madera County, has won a bid to rescue the Mammoth Orange food stand from where it sat rotting in a Chowchilla city storage yard. The Fossil Discovery Center is across the street from the largest deposit of fossils on the West Coast, according to the center's website.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A pickup crashed into a big rig carrying boxes of powdered pesticide on California 99, causing an explosion that left the road covered with toxic chemicals, authorities said Tuesday. The fiery crash was reported shortly after 9 p.m. Monday, just south of the small town of Earlimart, about 40 miles north of Bakersfield, the California Highway Patrol said. The semi truck was carrying chlorpyrifos, a commonly used insecticide.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | PETER H. KING
As you leave the 99-- WHO LEAVES? . . . who ever leaves the Cold ugly dry hot slippery bloody Dirty foggy sleek powerful Ninety nine? NOT RAZA, Okies, Arkies, Chapos, Armenians--not even THE MCHIGGENBOTHOMS! --From the poem "Gabby Took the 99," by Jose Montoya, part of a new anthology of literature from the Central Valley entitled "Highway 99." * At school the teachers always were trying to stuff Saroyan into our brains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Millions of swarming honey bees are on the loose after a truck carrying crates of the buzzing insects flipped over on a highway in Sacramento. The California Highway Patrol says 8- to 12-million bees escaped from the crates in which they were stored, swarming over an area of Highway 99 and stinging officers, firefighters and tow truck drivers who were trying to clear the accident from the roadway. CHP Officer Michael Bradley says at about 10 a.m. a tractor trailer flipped over while entering the highway on its way to Yakima, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Federal regulators have initiated an investigation into whether a local tour bus company should be immediately shut down after one of its buses crashed in the Central Valley, sending 15 passengers to the hospital. Marissa Padilla, a spokeswoman for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, said the agency is working with the California Highway Patrol to investigate the cause of Monday's crash. The bus operator, Huntington Park-based Fronteras del Norte, has logged more than 200 safety violations relating to vehicle maintenance over the last two years, ranging from a broken cab door to defective brakes and insufficient emergency exits, according to records with the FMCSA.
TRAVEL
October 9, 1994 | KITTY MORSE, Morse is a free-lance writer based in Vista
When I plan a trip up north to Sacramento or the Bay Area, I try to allow an extra day for travel. That way I can abandon the gray infinity of Interstate 5 in favor of the more leisurely drive up my favorite highway: California 99. But my real reason for choosing 99 over I-5 is connected with my interest in food, for the historic road links a string of ethnic groups, each steeped in the flavors of its country of origin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
CHOWCHILLA, Calif. - This city is in a pickle over a giant orange. The onetime attraction sits rotting in the city storage yard, the end of the road for the last of the Central Valley's fruit-themed food stands that once dotted Highway 99 from Bakersfield to Tracy. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. So city worker Joe Roman is perplexed about a sudden, impassioned competition to buy and salvage the ersatz fruit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
CHOWCHILLA, Calif. - This city is in a pickle over a giant orange. The onetime attraction sits rotting in the city storage yard, the end of the road for the last of the Central Valley's fruit-themed food stands that once dotted Highway 99 from Bakersfield to Tracy. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. So city worker Joe Roman is perplexed about a sudden, impassioned competition to buy and salvage the ersatz fruit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Millions of swarming honey bees are on the loose after a truck carrying crates of the buzzing insects flipped over on a highway in Sacramento. The California Highway Patrol says 8- to 12-million bees escaped from the crates in which they were stored, swarming over an area of Highway 99 and stinging officers, firefighters and tow truck drivers who were trying to clear the accident from the roadway. CHP Officer Michael Bradley says at about 10 a.m. a tractor trailer flipped over while entering the highway on its way to Yakima, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A pickup crashed into a big rig carrying boxes of powdered pesticide on California 99, causing an explosion that left the road covered with toxic chemicals, authorities said Tuesday. The fiery crash was reported shortly after 9 p.m. Monday, just south of the small town of Earlimart, about 40 miles north of Bakersfield, the California Highway Patrol said. The semi truck was carrying chlorpyrifos, a commonly used insecticide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State transportation officials broke ground on a $62-million project to widen a 6-mile stretch of California Highway 99 south of Fresno, from Selma to Kingsburg. The increasingly congested four-lane highway will be expanded to six lanes. Completion is expected by 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The highway that cleaves this valley will never make the list of most scenic, though the pink and white flowers planted along its spine just might be the biggest collection of oleanders in the world. Highway 99 runs straight up the gut of California, from Weedpatch to Red Bluff, through 450 miles of industrial farms and beaten-up towns and wannabe big cities. With the rivers dammed and lakes drained dry, no feature on the Central Valley map quite throbs with life as 99 does.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | PETER H. KING
As you leave the 99-- WHO LEAVES? . . . who ever leaves the Cold ugly dry hot slippery bloody Dirty foggy sleek powerful Ninety nine? NOT RAZA, Okies, Arkies, Chapos, Armenians--not even THE MCHIGGENBOTHOMS! --From the poem "Gabby Took the 99," by Jose Montoya, part of a new anthology of literature from the Central Valley entitled "Highway 99." * At school the teachers always were trying to stuff Saroyan into our brains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
FRESNO - What is old, and even older, will unite to return a roadside attraction in the shape of a giant orange to Highway 99. The San Joaquin Valley Paleontology Foundation, which runs the Fossil Discovery Center of Madera County, has won a bid to rescue the Mammoth Orange food stand from where it sat rotting in a Chowchilla city storage yard. The Fossil Discovery Center is across the street from the largest deposit of fossils on the West Coast, according to the center's website.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Pottery Barn is opening its only outlet store west of Texas in the Outlets at Tejon, a 320,000-square-foot center north of the Grapevine set to begin operating in August . The 12,397-square-foot unit will be Pottery Barn's ninth outlet store in the United States. Pottery Barn had 193 standard stores as of Oct. 28. The chain is owned by Williams-Sonoma Inc. of San Francisco, which also runs an eponymous chain as well as the West Elm home furnishings business. In the third quarter, Pottery Barn same-store sales rose 8.4%, smaller than the 11.1% increase it saw during the same quarter in 2012.
TRAVEL
October 9, 1994 | KITTY MORSE, Morse is a free-lance writer based in Vista
When I plan a trip up north to Sacramento or the Bay Area, I try to allow an extra day for travel. That way I can abandon the gray infinity of Interstate 5 in favor of the more leisurely drive up my favorite highway: California 99. But my real reason for choosing 99 over I-5 is connected with my interest in food, for the historic road links a string of ethnic groups, each steeped in the flavors of its country of origin.
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