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Hijackings Cuba

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NEWS
June 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cuban gunboats fired for more than four hours Saturday on a Cuban freighter loaded with Florida-bound refugees who reportedly hijacked the vessel. Seven people were injured, one critically. Four of the wounded, including the ship's captain, were taken by Coast Guard helicopters to Key West Memorial Hospital. Three people who were hurt scrambling for cover during the shooting were treated on the ship, Coast Guard officials said.
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NATIONAL
March 20, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
U.S. fighter jets scrambled Wednesday evening as a hijacked Cuban passenger plane headed for the United States, then escorted the vintage propeller-driven aircraft with 35 people aboard to a safe landing in Key West, authorities said. There were no reports of injuries and the six alleged hijackers were taken into custody by the FBI, authorities said. The passengers were being interviewed by U.S. Customs agents into the evening.
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NEWS
July 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. officials weighed the fate of a Cuban military officer who hijacked a commercial airliner at gunpoint and forced it to fly to the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. While U.S. authorities said no decision on prosecuting the hijacker, identified as Lt. Col. Jose Fernandez Pupo, would be made for several days, legal experts said it appeared unlikely his request for political asylum would be granted.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. officials weighed the fate of a Cuban military officer who hijacked a commercial airliner at gunpoint and forced it to fly to the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. While U.S. authorities said no decision on prosecuting the hijacker, identified as Lt. Col. Jose Fernandez Pupo, would be made for several days, legal experts said it appeared unlikely his request for political asylum would be granted.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a sign that political unrest in Cuba is continuing, Cuban hijackers commandeered a naval vessel, killed a Cuban naval officer and set sail for the United States, U.S. and Cuban officials said Tuesday. The Coast Guard said it had intercepted a 50-foot green-hulled vessel that matched the description of the hijacked ship but was not certain it was the same vessel. About 27 would-be emigres were taken into custody. The hijacking, reported to U.S.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
U.S. fighter jets scrambled Wednesday evening as a hijacked Cuban passenger plane headed for the United States, then escorted the vintage propeller-driven aircraft with 35 people aboard to a safe landing in Key West, authorities said. There were no reports of injuries and the six alleged hijackers were taken into custody by the FBI, authorities said. The passengers were being interviewed by U.S. Customs agents into the evening.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft said a battalion of armed plainclothes federal agents will begin flying on domestic commercial flights to guard against the kind of hijackings that ended in the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks. These agents, many of whom will come from the Justice Department, will augment the Federal Air Marshal program, a covert effort by the Federal Aviation Administration. The original Sky Marshal program began in the 1970s to prevent hijackings to Cuba.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | DUNCAN MANSFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty-nine years ago, hijackers took over an airliner with 27 passengers and four crew aboard and threatened to crash into the government's nuclear weapons production complex in Oak Ridge. "They let us know that if we didn't have the money by X hour then we were going to dive into Oak Ridge," co-pilot Harold Johnson recalled from his Memphis home. "And there was no doubt in my mind that we would have done just that."
OPINION
May 6, 2005 | DAVID GELERNTER, David Gelernter is professor of computer science at Yale University and a senior fellow in Jewish thought at the Shalem Center, Jerusalem.
Noticing patterns helps you predict, sometimes, how a story will turn out. For example, there's the law of loopholes: Every loophole will eventually be exploited; every exploited loophole will eventually be closed. This is human nature. Consider post-9/11 Washington -- a sad sight, with long lines of tourists patiently awaiting yet another inspection for the privilege of entering yet another government building they probably helped buy with their own money.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, seeking to reassure worried travelers, will call today for more government involvement in airport security screening, installation of assault-resistant cockpit doors and a dramatic increase in the federal air marshal program, congressional and aviation sources said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a sign that political unrest in Cuba is continuing, Cuban hijackers commandeered a naval vessel, killed a Cuban naval officer and set sail for the United States, U.S. and Cuban officials said Tuesday. The Coast Guard said it had intercepted a 50-foot green-hulled vessel that matched the description of the hijacked ship but was not certain it was the same vessel. About 27 would-be emigres were taken into custody. The hijacking, reported to U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cuban gunboats fired for more than four hours Saturday on a Cuban freighter loaded with Florida-bound refugees who reportedly hijacked the vessel. Seven people were injured, one critically. Four of the wounded, including the ship's captain, were taken by Coast Guard helicopters to Key West Memorial Hospital. Three people who were hurt scrambling for cover during the shooting were treated on the ship, Coast Guard officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-two years after he escaped from a California prison and allegedly hijacked a passenger jet to Cuba, a Los Angeles man was returned Friday to the United States to face federal air piracy and kidnapping charges. Byron Vaughn Booth, 56, was deported from Nigeria, where he had been living for many years, following an odyssey that took him from Cuba to Algeria, North Korea to Egypt, the FBI said.
NEWS
January 14, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The date was Sept. 11. Vowing to combat "the menace of air piracy," the president announced that specially trained, armed federal agents would be deployed on airliners. That president was Richard Nixon, and the year was 1970, when a series of violent hijackings around the world shook the confidence of air travelers. Thirty-one years later, President Bush also has turned to air marshals to protect the skies.
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