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Hilary And Jackie Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one could accuse English actress Emily Watson of trying to duck out of intense, difficult, demanding roles. That was apparent from her very first film, last year's "Breaking the Waves," in which she played a naive, God-fearing young woman from a Scottish village. She takes lovers at the behest of her husband, an oil rig worker paralyzed in an accident, and is ostracized as a whore in her community. The grueling role landed Watson an Oscar nomination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hollywood hosts the Academy Awards on Sunday, few countries will feel as much pride of homeland as Australia, which has produced seven of this year's Oscar nominees. They include Cate Blanchett for best actress in "Elizabeth," Geoffrey Rush for best supporting actor in "Shakespeare in Love," Rachel Griffiths for best supporting actress in "Hilary and Jackie," Peter Weir for best director of "The Truman Show" and David Hirschfelder for best original score for "Elizabeth."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
We should, I suppose, be grateful to the British. They've just given us a new highly touted feature film about one of the most astonishing musicians of the last 40 years, and it is a film that promises to do for Elgar's Cello Concerto what "Elvira Madigan" did for Mozart's 21st Piano Concerto, and what "Shine" did for Rachmaninoff's Third.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the adage holds true that there's no such thing as bad publicity, the producers of "Hilary and Jackie" will be mightily relieved. The film, a biopic of the legendary virtuoso English cellist Jacqueline du Pre (played by Emily Watson), opened in Britain last weekend to an extraordinary chorus of disapproval--some of it from the musical world's most revered names.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hollywood hosts the Academy Awards on Sunday, few countries will feel as much pride of homeland as Australia, which has produced seven of this year's Oscar nominees. They include Cate Blanchett for best actress in "Elizabeth," Geoffrey Rush for best supporting actor in "Shakespeare in Love," Rachel Griffiths for best supporting actress in "Hilary and Jackie," Peter Weir for best director of "The Truman Show" and David Hirschfelder for best original score for "Elizabeth."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the adage holds true that there's no such thing as bad publicity, the producers of "Hilary and Jackie" will be mightily relieved. The film, a biopic of the legendary virtuoso English cellist Jacqueline du Pre (played by Emily Watson), opened in Britain last weekend to an extraordinary chorus of disapproval--some of it from the musical world's most revered names.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
We should, I suppose, be grateful to the British. They've just given us a new highly touted feature film about one of the most astonishing musicians of the last 40 years, and it is a film that promises to do for Elgar's Cello Concerto what "Elvira Madigan" did for Mozart's 21st Piano Concerto, and what "Shine" did for Rachmaninoff's Third.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one could accuse English actress Emily Watson of trying to duck out of intense, difficult, demanding roles. That was apparent from her very first film, last year's "Breaking the Waves," in which she played a naive, God-fearing young woman from a Scottish village. She takes lovers at the behest of her husband, an oil rig worker paralyzed in an accident, and is ostracized as a whore in her community. The grueling role landed Watson an Oscar nomination.
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