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January 9, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Though he's kept busy with a variety of film and art projects, Devendra Banhart hasn't put out a new studio album since 2009's "What Will We Be" -- a relative eternity for the once-prolific freak-folk prince, who recently moved from Los Angeles to New York. That's set to change March 12 with the release of Mala," Banhart's debut for Nonesuch Records following a brief stint at Reprise. (The title means "small" in Serbian, a nod to the heritage of his fiancée, Ana Kras.) Working with guitarist Noah Georgeson, the singer laid down the 14-track set at his former home here, using a vintage Tascam recorder he found in a pawn shop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Josef Woodard
HILDEGARD VON BINGEN: "O Jerusalem." Sequentia (Deutsche Harmonia Mundi) * * * Some eight centuries after her death, the mystic Medieval composer Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179) has struck a chord with a broad audience, having become, somewhat remarkably, one of the best-known female composers in history. Part of the popularity can be attributed to the series of recordings begun in 1982 by the early music ensemble Sequentia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Margarethe von Trotta, who helped lead the New German Cinema movement and has been considered one of the world's premiere feminist filmmakers ever since directing (with then-husband Volker Schlöndorff) 1975's "The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum," sheds light ? literally and figuratively ? on another exceptional woman, 12th century Benedictine nun Hildegard von Bingen, in the superbly rendered and deeply absorbing religious drama "Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen. " Reuniting once again with luminous German actress Barbara Sukowa (seen in the director's "Rosa Luxemburg" and "Rosenstrasse," among others)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Though he's kept busy with a variety of film and art projects, Devendra Banhart hasn't put out a new studio album since 2009's "What Will We Be" -- a relative eternity for the once-prolific freak-folk prince, who recently moved from Los Angeles to New York. That's set to change March 12 with the release of Mala," Banhart's debut for Nonesuch Records following a brief stint at Reprise. (The title means "small" in Serbian, a nod to the heritage of his fiancée, Ana Kras.) Working with guitarist Noah Georgeson, the singer laid down the 14-track set at his former home here, using a vintage Tascam recorder he found in a pawn shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Margarethe von Trotta, who helped lead the New German Cinema movement and has been considered one of the world's premiere feminist filmmakers ever since directing (with then-husband Volker Schlöndorff) 1975's "The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum," sheds light ? literally and figuratively ? on another exceptional woman, 12th century Benedictine nun Hildegard von Bingen, in the superbly rendered and deeply absorbing religious drama "Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen. " Reuniting once again with luminous German actress Barbara Sukowa (seen in the director's "Rosa Luxemburg" and "Rosenstrasse," among others)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1998 | Bernard D. Sherman, Bernard D. Sherman is the author of "Inside Early Music: Conversations With Performers" (Oxford University Press, New York, 1997)
What do you do for an icon on her 900th birthday? You interpret her--and then, to liven things up, you argue about it. This year is the big 9-0-0 for Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century abbess who has become a '90s cult figure. She is undoubtedly our only celebrity composer with a short-form bio that also reads "mystic, theologian, naturalist, herbalist, poet and advisor to emperors."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992
"M ore Talk, Less Bach," last Sunday's story on KUSC-FM by Patrick Mott, has prompted an outpouring from readers . Those critical of the station's revamped format outnumbered supporters by more than 2 to 1. A sampling of their views: So KUSC and the Smith-Grices have run afoul of Ernest Fleischmann and his cronies, who have absolutely no room to talk about treating Los Angeles' classical music audience as "halfway morons." It was their insistence on dictating and controlling the classical scene that cost us Andre Previn and will probably cost us Esa-Pekka Salonen when he realizes the malaise that afflicts classical music in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998
What's happening this summer: * "The Peony Pavilion" ran into problems with Shanghai censors, but the three-week Lincoln Center Festival of cutting-edge arts events goes on through July 26 with a new production of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" by the Tony Award-winning team of Nicholas Hytner and Bob Crowley ("Carousel"), early music group Sequentia's production of Hildegard von Bingen's "Ordo Virtutum" (arguably the world's first opera) and the Hamburg Ballet's "Bernstein Dances" with costumes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
Ted Perry, whose Hyperion Records explored a wide range of classical music, has died. He was 71. Perry died of lung cancer Sunday in a London hospital, said Mike Spring of Hyperion. Perry, who had worked with several record companies in Britain and Australia, founded Hyperion in 1981 and drove a cab to keep the struggling operation going. While driving, he heard a broadcast of songs by 12th century German abbess Hildegard von Bingen, and contacted the artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1998 | Bernard D. Sherman, Bernard D. Sherman is the author of "Inside Early Music: Conversations With Performers" (Oxford University Press, New York, 1997)
What do you do for an icon on her 900th birthday? You interpret her--and then, to liven things up, you argue about it. This year is the big 9-0-0 for Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century abbess who has become a '90s cult figure. She is undoubtedly our only celebrity composer with a short-form bio that also reads "mystic, theologian, naturalist, herbalist, poet and advisor to emperors."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Josef Woodard
HILDEGARD VON BINGEN: "O Jerusalem." Sequentia (Deutsche Harmonia Mundi) * * * Some eight centuries after her death, the mystic Medieval composer Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179) has struck a chord with a broad audience, having become, somewhat remarkably, one of the best-known female composers in history. Part of the popularity can be attributed to the series of recordings begun in 1982 by the early music ensemble Sequentia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High polish, full voices and dramatic economy characterized the latest version of Hildegard von Bingen's "Ordo Virtutum" at Mount St. Mary's College in Brentwood. The Sunday afternoon performance (scheduled to be repeated Monday night) maintained the medieval ensemble Sequentia's place as the primary source for the performance of Hildegard's music, which it continues to commit to recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "Renaissance Christmas" program by Michael Eagan's Musical Angelica and a small vocal ensemble Thursday in Founders Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa promised the intimacy and directness of a holiday celebration as it might have occurred among friends centuries ago. But as it turned out, some things worked better than others. The instrumental contributions were consistently strong; the vocals were varied.
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