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Hill Street Blues

NEWS
March 16, 1986
As an ex-Minnesotan, I have been a fan of Ed Marinaro's since his days as one of the NFL's Vikings. I will miss him very much on "Hill Street Blues," but I wish him success in his new ventures. I only hope that the movies he stars in will be better than "Policewoman Centerfold." Caryn Goldberg, Canoga Park
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NEWS
May 24, 1987
We want to thank the producers, cast and crew of "Hill Street Blues" for the years of engrossing television they have provided us. We have laughed, cried, been angered, deeply moved and always entertained. Best wishes to all of you in your personal and professional lives. We will miss you tremendously. Roby Gallagher, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | RICK DU BROW
With two groundbreaking series, "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law," producer Steven Bochco took TV drama in new directions in the 1980s, broke taboos, liberated the storytelling form and had a major impact on film making. "Hill Street Blues" had the most influence. Created by Bochco and Michael Kozoll, it came about when Fred Silverman, then president of hard-pressed NBC, approached them to create a different kind of cop show. In 1981, "Hill Street Blues" exploded into the public consciousness and became the rock on which NBC built its climb to the top. "Hill Street Blues" was a fast-moving, ensemble show that mixed drama with comedy touches as it interwove multiple stories of the personal and professional lives of big-city cops with blunt, gritty, often shocking realism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1992
"I f I Ran a Network . . . ," last Sunday's commentary by television producer Steven Bochco ("Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law") has prompted a heavy response from readers. A sampling: One of Bochco's solutions to the dwindling reception of network programming is to do away with censors. How many really believe that the quality would go up? Would we get more shows like "Masterpiece Theatre" or "Hill Street Blues"? No, we'd just get more profane language, more violence and more exploitative sex. And definitely more "politically correct" thinking from the industry's rather liberal sect.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987
Regarding Outtakes' roll call of the future plans of "Hill Street Blues" actors (Outtakes, April 19): Having appeared in six episodes of "Hill Street Blues" this past season (as Reporter No. 1 or 2, surely you remember), I believe that I qualify for the title of periodic, part-time semi-regular. As such, I'm certain that you'll be interested in my immediate future. To wit: I have begun rehearsals for "Oldtimers Game," opening May 22 at International City Stage in Long Beach.
NEWS
July 31, 1988
I am really disappointed with "Hill Street Blues." When "Hill Street" was on NBC, I was not old enough to understand what it was all about. After hearing all those rave reviews, I was sure Channel 13 had a show worth seeing. But as I watch it, I can't seem to stay awake. My brother thinks it deals with some controversial topics. However, I think differently. During the roll call, I would be lucky to catch one or two words that the sergeant is saying. Halfway through the thing, I don't even know what the plot is about.
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