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Hillel Slovak

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NEWS
June 30, 1988
Hillel Slovak, 25, guitarist for the flamboyant L.A. rock band the Red Hot Chili Peppers, was found dead Monday in his Hollywood apartment. A coroner's spokesman said results of an autopsy performed Wednesday were inconclusive. The Chili Peppers, which have released three albums on EMI-Manhattan Records since forming in 1983, have not gained national stardom. But the foursome's wild antics on stage have given the group a strong following in the Los Angeles area.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Steve Appleford
"Hello L.A., my beautiful home, my beautiful home!" The words were heartfelt and unsurprising from Flea (nee Michael Balzary), spoken Sunday with intense passion by the acclaimed bassist at the second of two sold-out nights at Staples Center with the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It is all part of the band's life mission, which was never just musical, but also remains an endless celebration of the city and punk-rock scene that birthed them in the early 1980s. PHOTOS: Red Hot Chili Peppers return to Los Angeles FOR THE RECORD: Red Hot Chili Peppers: In the Aug. 14 Calendar section, a review of the Red Hot Chili Peppers' concert at Staples Center said that the band performed "My Friends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988 | JEFF SPURRIER and STEVE HOCHMAN
"It's the worst thing that ever happened to me," says Flea, the bassist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, one of Los Angeles' most colorful and energetic rock groups. "He's been my friend since I was 12 and now he's dead because of heroin." Flea was speaking about the recent, apparent overdose death of Chili Peppers guitarist Hillel Slovak, 25. "The saddest thing is that you could call up the guys who sold him the stuff that killed him and they'd be happy to sell you (some more)," Flea continued.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988 | JEFF SPURRIER and STEVE HOCHMAN
"It's the worst thing that ever happened to me," says Flea, the bassist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, one of Los Angeles' most colorful and energetic rock groups. "He's been my friend since I was 12 and now he's dead because of heroin." Flea was speaking about the recent, apparent overdose death of Chili Peppers guitarist Hillel Slovak, 25. "The saddest thing is that you could call up the guys who sold him the stuff that killed him and they'd be happy to sell you (some more)," Flea continued.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Steve Appleford
"Hello L.A., my beautiful home, my beautiful home!" The words were heartfelt and unsurprising from Flea (nee Michael Balzary), spoken Sunday with intense passion by the acclaimed bassist at the second of two sold-out nights at Staples Center with the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It is all part of the band's life mission, which was never just musical, but also remains an endless celebration of the city and punk-rock scene that birthed them in the early 1980s. PHOTOS: Red Hot Chili Peppers return to Los Angeles FOR THE RECORD: Red Hot Chili Peppers: In the Aug. 14 Calendar section, a review of the Red Hot Chili Peppers' concert at Staples Center said that the band performed "My Friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | DON WALLER
The sharpest hook on the fourth LP by Los Angeles' newly reconstituted Pep Boys--dedicated to the group's late guitarist Hillel Slovak--is the sound of Anthony Kiedis singin' Sly-ly, "If you see me gettin' high, knock me down," on the song "Knock Me Down." That tune, and the w-i-l-double-d mamma-slamma-jamma-splunka-punk-funk of "Magic Johnson" might burn the brightest, buds, but the rest of this largely thrashin' LP is pretty solid smoke too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's become something of a ritual in our society--after a celebrity reaches rock bottom, they go detox, kick their nasty habits, lose 60 pounds, make a comeback (film/album) and sign a six-figure book deal for their autobiography. Who's the latest? None other than fallen pop idol David Crosby. He's cleaned up his act, is hard at work on a comeback album (for A&M Records) and will release his memoirs in October, courtesy of Doubleday Books.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
As usual, John Frusciante was supported by the other three Red Hot Chili Peppers when he performed at the Roxy on Monday. But Anthony Kiedis, Flea and Chad Smith--who welcomed the guitarist back to the band in 1998 after a five-year, addiction-forced absence--weren't on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Hey Pepper-Uppers! You knew to expect some changes when you saw the Angeleno punk-funk pioneers out-attituding tennis stud Andre Agassi in that shoe commercial. But you couldn't have foreseen that this, the band's fifth album (due in stores Sept. 24), would contain a song like "Breaking the Girl." With its acoustic guitars and recorders and yearning lyric, the number wouldn't have been out of place on an early-'70s album by, say, Dave Mason or somebody.
NEWS
June 30, 1988
Hillel Slovak, 25, guitarist for the flamboyant L.A. rock band the Red Hot Chili Peppers, was found dead Monday in his Hollywood apartment. A coroner's spokesman said results of an autopsy performed Wednesday were inconclusive. The Chili Peppers, which have released three albums on EMI-Manhattan Records since forming in 1983, have not gained national stardom. But the foursome's wild antics on stage have given the group a strong following in the Los Angeles area.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
We interrupt this program with the following public service announcement: Green Day's "Warning" is the antidote for sleep-deprived scenesters. If you gotta be up like a jaybird but you've been out like an owl, toss on the punk trio's latest album for a healthy dose of snap, crackle and pop. . . . My gawd, Minnie Driver's got class. On Saturday, she cut this momma some slack by entertaining my 4-year-old with ocean tales at the hipster Hollywood hair salon Lather.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1992 | Steve Hochman and Dennis Hunt
After nearly destroying many of rock's most creative figures in the '60s, heroin generally went out of style in the '70s and early '80s. But an alarming number of today's alternative and hard-rock musicians have acknowledged using the narcotic in recent years. They range from Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash and Red Hot Chili Peppers lead singer Anthony Kiedis to Ministry mastermind Al Jourgensen and rock's newest parents, Nirvana's Kurt Cobain and Hole's Courtney Love.
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