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Hilmar Kopper

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BUSINESS
December 13, 1989
Deutsche Bank has named Hilmar Kopper as its new chairman to succeed Alfred Herrhausen, who was killed in a terrorist attack Nov. 30. Kopper, 54, had been widely mentioned as the most likely successor to Herrhausen to head West Germany's largest bank. Some analysts had predicted that he would be joined by a second chairman--a system that was in place until the retirement of F. Wilhelm Christians in 1988--but Kopper will be the sole chairman.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 1989
Deutsche Bank has named Hilmar Kopper as its new chairman to succeed Alfred Herrhausen, who was killed in a terrorist attack Nov. 30. Kopper, 54, had been widely mentioned as the most likely successor to Herrhausen to head West Germany's largest bank. Some analysts had predicted that he would be joined by a second chairman--a system that was in place until the retirement of F. Wilhelm Christians in 1988--but Kopper will be the sole chairman.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deutsche Bank to Trim Work Force: The biggest German commercial bank plans to cut more than 10,000 jobs in a sweeping restructuring intended to reverse a slide in profit, news reports said. According to Der Spiegel magazine, Chairman Hilmar Kopper plans to cut 20% of the bank's 54,400-member work force in Germany. The bank also has 19,000 employees in other countries. Bank officials could not be reached for comment on Sunday.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a crisis of confidence, Germany's largest bank defended itself Monday against charges that it acted blindly in lending more than $700 million to fugitive real estate mogul Juergen Schneider. Deutsche Bank chief executive Hilmar Kopper said his financial institution was the victim of a "systematically prepared and executed fraud" in which Schneider possibly had help.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite shareholder lawsuits, plummeting stock values and executive shake-ups, the message being put out by German helmsmen of DaimlerChrysler is that the troubled multinational is on the right track to reach its long-term aim of becoming one of the leading global auto makers. That's their story and they're sticking to it.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
German prosecutors have been searching far and wide for developer Juergen Schneider since he disappeared with $300 million on April 4, leaving $3.1 billion in debt and unpaid contractor bills. Meanwhile, the banks Schneider allegedly defrauded have been trying to determine how a developer losing about $300 million a year was continually able to obtain loans.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German authorities launched an investigation Thursday into the finances of one of the country's biggest real estate moguls and his wife, who disappeared over the weekend, leaving behind billions of dollars of debt and an empire in disarray. Executives of the abandoned Dr. Juergen Schneider holding company met in Frankfurt with representatives of more than 40 creditor banks seeking ways to avoid bankruptcy and to complete unfinished construction projects.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germans rejoiced Friday at the news that fugitive real estate baron Juergen Schneider had been arrested Thursday in a suburb of Miami. His capture, following a hunt that lasted more than a year, raised hopes that the man behind one of modern Germany's most spectacular business collapses would eventually be brought home to justice.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1990 | JOHN M. BERRY, WASHINGTON POST
A scant seven years ago, two of the three largest banks in the world were American. Today, all of the top 10 are Japanese, and only one U.S. institution, Citibank, even manages to squeak into the top 25. Are banks becoming another American casualty of global competition? Raising that specter, U.S.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When in the course of human events it becomes necessary at 8 o'clock in the German night to score a quart of milk . . . or a bottle of cough medicine . . . or a box of diapers . . . or some vanilla extract . . . Kein Weg (No way), Jose! Shopkeepers in this rich nation of 82 million don't stay open past 6:30 on most weekday evenings. They don't do business past 1:30 on most Saturday afternoons.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continental, the German tire manufacturer, needed help--expert and fast. Pirelli, its Italian competitor, had just launched a hostile takeover bid, and Continental had no idea how to defend itself. For financial advice, Continental turned not to a domestic bank but, of all places, to the venerable London merchant bank Morgan Grenfell.
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