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Hilton Kramer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Hilton Kramer, one of the art world's most polarizing and widely read critics for 50 years and founding editor of the conservative arts journal The New Criterion, died Tuesday in Harpswell, Maine. He was 84. Kramer had a rare blood disorder and died of heart failure, said New Criterion's current editor Roger Kimball. A staunch champion of modernism and fearless detractor of most of the art that followed, Kramer was chief art critic for the New York Times for nearly a decade before giving up the coveted post to start New Criterion in 1982.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Did you know that Michiganders, in general, and Detroiters, in particular, are idle, good-for-nothing spendthrifts? Michael Kinsley thinks so. The New Republic's editor-at-large has written a snarky new column contemplating possible masterpiece sales from the Detroit Institute of Arts in the face of civic bankruptcy. The commentator likens the Motor City to the stately homes of England, which went into a "Downton Abbey" tailspin a century ago as Britain and the East India Co. began their inevitable rot. “There is a rich tradition of wastrels squandering the family fortune, then taking a few canvases to the pawnbroker's.”  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat There is also a rich tradition of know-nothings writing about art and museums.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
Here's a quick fairy tale about the life of art in the past quarter-century: Behind a great, groaning dam built from the hard-won bricks of Eternal Cultural Standards and the mortar of Aesthetic Quality, there has risen a dangerously swollen tide of artistic debauchery: Pop artists, Minimalists, Conceptualists and other horrid children of the 1960s, along with their more recent, equally debased progeny, the teeming multiculturists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Hilton Kramer, one of the art world's most polarizing and widely read critics for 50 years and founding editor of the conservative arts journal The New Criterion, died Tuesday in Harpswell, Maine. He was 84. Kramer had a rare blood disorder and died of heart failure, said New Criterion's current editor Roger Kimball. A staunch champion of modernism and fearless detractor of most of the art that followed, Kramer was chief art critic for the New York Times for nearly a decade before giving up the coveted post to start New Criterion in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In 1983, filmmaker Tamra Davis, then working at a Los Angeles art gallery, struck up an acquaintance with artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, subsequently shooting a lengthy interview with him in 1985. She cut her footage of him, capturing a handsome, enthusiastic, articulate young man into a 20-minute film, screened at MOCA's major Basquiat retrospective 20 years later. Davis then realized she had the nucleus of a documentary that would take years to complete, tracking down archival materials and the numerous people who knew him before his drug-related death at 27 in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Shame on Times art critic Christopher Knight for expecting readers to buy the vitriol he levels at the New Criterion and its editor, Hilton Kramer ("The Little Journal That Can't," Dec. 29). How can one take Knight seriously when he employs the very tactics he is chastising? Kramer is prone to jeremiads, as are most writers whose work appears in his magazine. But just because he is paranoid does not mean people aren't out to get him all the same. One of those is clearly Knight, who seems obsessed with proclaiming the error of the New Criterion's ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Did you know that Michiganders, in general, and Detroiters, in particular, are idle, good-for-nothing spendthrifts? Michael Kinsley thinks so. The New Republic's editor-at-large has written a snarky new column contemplating possible masterpiece sales from the Detroit Institute of Arts in the face of civic bankruptcy. The commentator likens the Motor City to the stately homes of England, which went into a "Downton Abbey" tailspin a century ago as Britain and the East India Co. began their inevitable rot. “There is a rich tradition of wastrels squandering the family fortune, then taking a few canvases to the pawnbroker's.”  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat There is also a rich tradition of know-nothings writing about art and museums.
BOOKS
May 9, 1999 | RUSSELL JACOBY, Russell Jacoby is the author of numerous books, including "Social Amnesia," "The Last Intellectuals" and the forthcoming "The End of Utopia." He teaches in the history department at UCLA
The term "New York intellectuals" has come to designate a generation of writers and critics born in the first decades of this century. Beyond the name, little about this group goes uncontested. Is this really a collection of writers with a common theme or orientation? What links Sidney Hook, the philosopher, and Alfred Kazin, the memoirist; or Lionel Trilling, the literary critic, and Susan Sontag, the novelist and writer?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Jasper Johns had his first show at the Leo Castelli Gallery, a Manhattan showcase most artists would kill for, and he immediately sold three paintings to the Museum of Modern Art. It was an auspicious beginning for an artist often said to be the best in the country and who commands higher auction prices than any other living artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television is at once the best and worst venue for Thomas Hart Benton. It's the best because it achieves what he always said he wanted to do: make his art available to "ordinary people." It's the worst because Benton was essentially a muralist whose figures are too large and whose canvasses of rural America too vast and busy--almost communities unto themselves--to be contained on the small screen, even with the most adroit camera work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In 1983, filmmaker Tamra Davis, then working at a Los Angeles art gallery, struck up an acquaintance with artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, subsequently shooting a lengthy interview with him in 1985. She cut her footage of him, capturing a handsome, enthusiastic, articulate young man into a 20-minute film, screened at MOCA's major Basquiat retrospective 20 years later. Davis then realized she had the nucleus of a documentary that would take years to complete, tracking down archival materials and the numerous people who knew him before his drug-related death at 27 in 1988.
BOOKS
May 9, 1999 | RUSSELL JACOBY, Russell Jacoby is the author of numerous books, including "Social Amnesia," "The Last Intellectuals" and the forthcoming "The End of Utopia." He teaches in the history department at UCLA
The term "New York intellectuals" has come to designate a generation of writers and critics born in the first decades of this century. Beyond the name, little about this group goes uncontested. Is this really a collection of writers with a common theme or orientation? What links Sidney Hook, the philosopher, and Alfred Kazin, the memoirist; or Lionel Trilling, the literary critic, and Susan Sontag, the novelist and writer?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Shame on Times art critic Christopher Knight for expecting readers to buy the vitriol he levels at the New Criterion and its editor, Hilton Kramer ("The Little Journal That Can't," Dec. 29). How can one take Knight seriously when he employs the very tactics he is chastising? Kramer is prone to jeremiads, as are most writers whose work appears in his magazine. But just because he is paranoid does not mean people aren't out to get him all the same. One of those is clearly Knight, who seems obsessed with proclaiming the error of the New Criterion's ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
Here's a quick fairy tale about the life of art in the past quarter-century: Behind a great, groaning dam built from the hard-won bricks of Eternal Cultural Standards and the mortar of Aesthetic Quality, there has risen a dangerously swollen tide of artistic debauchery: Pop artists, Minimalists, Conceptualists and other horrid children of the 1960s, along with their more recent, equally debased progeny, the teeming multiculturists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2001
As a founding member of the Independent Directors Committee of the Directors Guild of America (along with Steven Soderbergh, Spike Jonze and Michael Apted), I think Kenneth Turan couldn't be more right ("New Cinema's Heartless Beat," Dec. 2). But the crisis of postmodernism (detached irony and heartless cynicism) in the cinema doesn't lie collectively with the filmmakers; it is a result of the distribution apparatus and the New York literati, specifically the New York Times. There are plenty of gifted young filmmakers who explore basic human emotions without pretense or cynical flair--look at Tony Barbieri's "One" or Rob Schmidt's "Saturn."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1985 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Andre Kertesz, who survived 30 years of obscurity in the United States to, in the twilight of his life, win bittersweet acknowledgement as one of the world's major photographers, died Saturday in New York. The Hungarian-born Kertesz was 91 and had been in frail health. Joseph Fernandez, a family friend, said Kertesz died in his sleep at the Greenwich Village home where he had lived for decades. Kertesz's glory--and the reason he was for so long underrated--was the simplicity of his subjects.
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