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BUSINESS
July 4, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Reader's Digest Assn. (RDA/RDB) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Jim: When it comes to Americana, Michael, I can't think of any more tried-and-true name than Readers's Digest, correct? Mike: Did you say tried and true or trite and true? Jim: Snippy right out of the box today, eh? But you're right. To many people, Reader's Digest isn't just old, it's musty old--as in not being of much use. Mike: That's right. When you flip the pages of Wall Street reports on this stock, moths come flying out.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 1999 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Intel (INTC) Jim: Today we look at the world's biggest semiconductor maker. It has annual sales of $26 billion, is one of the most heavily traded Nasdaq stocks and is probably best known to our readers for its Pentium microprocessor chips for personal computers. Mike: Some things have changed for Intel over the last year or so. In the old days, buying or selling Intel was basically a play on high-technology.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Microsoft (MSFT) JIM: (Don't Buy) MIKE: (Buy) * Jim: Well, Mike, we're taking another look at Microsoft today, and it's only the second time we've revisited a stock we've already reviewed. Mike: Ironically, the first time was when we reconsidered Microsoft's archrival, Apple Computer. We both recommended Microsoft's stock last summer, but it seems there's been a spot of news lately that warrants a chat about whether the stock is still a buy.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Jim: It's time for our semiannual review, Mike, when we go back and take a look-see at our picks of the last year or so. It's sometimes painful, but the mail indicates our readers like to see how we've fared. Mike: I think what some of our readers like is the chance to see where they've been smarter than we are. Hey, it's a risk for anyone who lays out their stock picks for public consumption. Jim: Oh sure, we're a courageous pair.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Healtheon/WebMD (HLTH) (Jim: Don't buy) (Mike: Buy) * Jim: Friday's sell-off didn't much help our first stock today, Mike, Healtheon/WebMD-- Mike: Boy, that name's a mouthful. Jim: --And I was just about to say, can't they do something about that name? Mike: Be grateful it's still that short, given Healtheon/WebMD's penchant for buying one company after another. For all we know, six months from now it might be HealtheonWebMDMedicalManagedCareInsiteHealthNetwork, or some such.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Alcatel (ALA) Jim: Buy Mike: Buy * Mike: Alcatel is the second-largest French company in terms of market capitalization, Jim, and here's this week's puzzler: Can you identify any other French enterprise of such size? Jim: Uh . . . Mike: I thought not. Jim: Actually, this is the first French stock we've done, no? Mike: Well, most Americans probably don't think of the French as global industrial leaders. Jim: Let's just say it's a good thing Alcatel doesn't make cars.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Nokia (NOK) (MIKE: Buy) (JIM: Buy) Jim: Explain something to me, Mike. Nokia is the world's leading maker of portable phones, and it's based in Finland. Its closest rival is a Swedish company, Ericsson. Now how did Scandinavia, of all places, get a lock on this cutting-edge industry? I mean, what's next? Greenland will be the DVD capital of the world? Mike: Maybe it's just so darn cold up there that no one wants to leave their cars to use a pay phone. Jim: Maybe it's something in the water.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Williams-Sonoma (WSM) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Mike: I'd like to start our chat about Williams-Sonoma, Jim, by briefly telling you the story of my family room cabinet. Jim: This should be compelling. Mike: I'm not saying it's "War and Peace." Anyhow, a few months ago we ordered said cabinet from a catalog company called Hold Everything.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
NetZero (NZRO) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Jim: Now, Mike, we both know the old saw about how one way to run a successful business is to give 'em the razor and sell 'em the blades. But-- Mike: What if you're giving away the razor and the blades? Jim: Exactly! Because NetZero offers customers free access to the Internet. Mike: As do several other firms, and their business model is basically the same: You get the free access all right, but in exchange they shove advertising down your throat.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK, Times Staff Writers
MCI WorldCom (WCOM) Jim: Mike, up first is MCI WorldCom, which is, of course, the nation's second-largest long-distance phone company--created last year by the $40-billion merger of MCI and WorldCom. Mike: Jim, I think you misspoke yourself right there. Jim: How so? Mike: Because I think calling MCI WorldCom a long-distance phone company is like calling Time Warner a cartoon company. It doesn't really tell you what this company is and what it's going to be. Jim: You're way ahead of me.
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