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BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A judge has dismissed a lawsuit that accused a columnist for The Times of illegally recording conversations with the president of the 1-800-GET-THIN marketing firm. The company is known for its ubiquitous billboards plastered along Southland freeways — and its catchy jingle that pops up on the radio and television — that promote shedding pounds via the Lap-Band weight-loss device. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Debre Katz Weintraub threw out the lawsuit that Robert Silverman, the marketing company's president, had filed against Times columnist Michael Hiltzik.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Sara Lee (SLE) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Buy * Jim: It's a good thing that Sara Lee's new chief executive is trying to turn this company upside down, because if he wasn't I believe Sara Lee would soon succumb to a new owner that would. Mike: Now Jim, before we continue with all that important corporate stuff, let me start by saying I think of Sara Lee as an old friend. Jim: My, so warm and fuzzy today, Mike. Let me guess.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2001 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Lowe's Cos. (LOW) Jim: Buy Mike: Don't buy Mike: I don't know about you, Jim, but I've noticed around Southern California that there's a new store anchoring a lot of these new malls: Lowe's home improvement stores. I think of stores like Lowe's and Home Depot as lumberyards with a college education. Jim: You know, this might be a knock on any other company, but Lowe's is almost a Home Depot wannabe. Mike: Almost? That's exactly what Lowe's is. Jim: All right.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Reader's Digest Assn. (RDA/RDB) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Jim: When it comes to Americana, Michael, I can't think of any more tried-and-true name than Readers's Digest, correct? Mike: Did you say tried and true or trite and true? Jim: Snippy right out of the box today, eh? But you're right. To many people, Reader's Digest isn't just old, it's musty old--as in not being of much use. Mike: That's right. When you flip the pages of Wall Street reports on this stock, moths come flying out.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1999 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Intel (INTC) Jim: Today we look at the world's biggest semiconductor maker. It has annual sales of $26 billion, is one of the most heavily traded Nasdaq stocks and is probably best known to our readers for its Pentium microprocessor chips for personal computers. Mike: Some things have changed for Intel over the last year or so. In the old days, buying or selling Intel was basically a play on high-technology.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Microsoft (MSFT) JIM: (Don't Buy) MIKE: (Buy) * Jim: Well, Mike, we're taking another look at Microsoft today, and it's only the second time we've revisited a stock we've already reviewed. Mike: Ironically, the first time was when we reconsidered Microsoft's archrival, Apple Computer. We both recommended Microsoft's stock last summer, but it seems there's been a spot of news lately that warrants a chat about whether the stock is still a buy.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Jim: It's time for our semiannual review, Mike, when we go back and take a look-see at our picks of the last year or so. It's sometimes painful, but the mail indicates our readers like to see how we've fared. Mike: I think what some of our readers like is the chance to see where they've been smarter than we are. Hey, it's a risk for anyone who lays out their stock picks for public consumption. Jim: Oh sure, we're a courageous pair.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Healtheon/WebMD (HLTH) (Jim: Don't buy) (Mike: Buy) * Jim: Friday's sell-off didn't much help our first stock today, Mike, Healtheon/WebMD-- Mike: Boy, that name's a mouthful. Jim: --And I was just about to say, can't they do something about that name? Mike: Be grateful it's still that short, given Healtheon/WebMD's penchant for buying one company after another. For all we know, six months from now it might be HealtheonWebMDMedicalManagedCareInsiteHealthNetwork, or some such.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Alcatel (ALA) Jim: Buy Mike: Buy * Mike: Alcatel is the second-largest French company in terms of market capitalization, Jim, and here's this week's puzzler: Can you identify any other French enterprise of such size? Jim: Uh . . . Mike: I thought not. Jim: Actually, this is the first French stock we've done, no? Mike: Well, most Americans probably don't think of the French as global industrial leaders. Jim: Let's just say it's a good thing Alcatel doesn't make cars.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Nokia (NOK) (MIKE: Buy) (JIM: Buy) Jim: Explain something to me, Mike. Nokia is the world's leading maker of portable phones, and it's based in Finland. Its closest rival is a Swedish company, Ericsson. Now how did Scandinavia, of all places, get a lock on this cutting-edge industry? I mean, what's next? Greenland will be the DVD capital of the world? Mike: Maybe it's just so darn cold up there that no one wants to leave their cars to use a pay phone. Jim: Maybe it's something in the water.
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