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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1995
I read with amazement about two Baptist pastors referring to Hindus as "pagans and cultists" ("Angry Baptists Decry Sale of Church to 'Pagan' Hindus," Aug. 5). I also read Prithvi Raj Singh's highly civilized and restrained comment on such brutal verbal assault. For a minute I thought I was living in another country and another era. I am flabbergasted at such arrogance and ignorance. I would like to ask (the pastors) these questions: Who gave you exclusive rights to God's domain?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
ENCINITAS, Calif. - Parents in this seaside town are in a twist over yoga, saying that adding the ancient practice of meditative exercise to the school curriculum is tantamount to religious indoctrination into Hinduism. School officials never thought that yoga, practiced by roughly 22 million Americans, would be controversial when they accepted a $533,000 grant from a local yoga studio to include Ashtanga yoga in a program where students also learn about healthy eating and cultivate small gardens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Malibu Hindu temple--already one of Hinduism's largest in the country--is in the midst of a $1-million physical expansion that also enhances the spiritual breadth of the ornate complex for devotees of the ancient Indian religion. Having learned that this weekend would be astrologically auspicious, the temple's priests are installing stone-carved statues of Shiva and two other deities in one hall, even though the building that will house them is still under construction.
WORLD
December 24, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Visitors to this ancient city are invariably struck by its timelessness, the feeling that life is as it was a thousand years ago. The faithful still bathe at dawn in the holy waters of the Ganges, the bereaved cremate their dead on hazy funeral pyres, and pilgrims trace a well-trodden circuit of temples and shrines that seem as numerous as the stars. But India is nothing if not a land of collisions between past and present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Hindu temple in the San Fernando Valley has opened in a small, nondescript wooden building on a busy Chatsworth street. Although its humble beginning doesn't compare to the elegant complex of Hindu shrines near Malibu Canyon, the temple nevertheless has carved out a distinction in a uniquely Southern California way. The swami for the Chatsworth temple is Alice Coltrane, a black convert to Hinduism and widow of celebrated jazz saxophonist John Coltrane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Hindu temple in the San Fernando Valley has opened in a small, nondescript wooden building on a busy Chatsworth street. Although its humble beginning doesn't compare to the elegant complex of Hindu shrines near Malibu Canyon, the temple nevertheless has carved out a distinction in a uniquely Southern California way. The swami for the Chatsworth temple is Alice Coltrane, a black convert to Hinduism and widow of celebrated jazz saxophonist John Coltrane.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Calabasas' horse country on a recent Saturday, the breeze carried the mingled sounds of whinnies and Hindu chants. Twelve students of world religions and teacher, James Santucci, followed the chanting to Lord Venkateswara's temple where a ceremony to the god, an incarnation of Vishnu "the preserver," was about to begin. Through a gate thick with images from Hindu myths, the class entered the "sacred abode of the gods," a courtyard around the temple, and removed their shoes.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
In an exhibit billed as "The Sensuous and the Sacred," the Smithsonian Institution introduces the public to a Hindu deity called Shiva. Worshiped in southeast India as the Lord of the Dance, Shiva plays a variety of roles in Hinduism -- both destroying the universe and creating it anew. This is the first time an exhibit devoted to what are called Chola bronzes has been assembled in the United States, said guest curator Vidya Dehejia, professor of art history at Columbia University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2006 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Aiming for compromise in a furor over the portrayal of Hinduism and ancient India in sixth-grade history books, a subcommittee recommended Monday that the California Board of Education adopt several changes to the text but acknowledged that neither side in the heated debate was likely to be satisfied.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pungent stick of incense burns in the living room as the sun sets over this La Palma home. Dinner is almost ready as Rakesh Patel prepares for arti. The Long Beach pharmacist lights the divo flames on the little lamp and passes it to his 7-year-old daughter, Shatabdi. With her little hands, she takes the lamp, steps before the family's home shrine and begins waving the flames. She chants loudly and sweetly to Lord Swaminarayan. "Jay Sadguru Swami Prabhu Jay Sadguru Swami Sahajanand Dayalu. . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
In a historic action, top leaders of five great religions met this month in Indonesia -- home to 200 million Muslims -- to condemn violence inflicted in the name of religion. The leaders representing Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim traditions came from five countries and included former Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid and Los Angeles Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
NEWS
March 4, 2007 | Rachel Konrad, Associated Press Writer
When Tara Guber created a yoga program five years ago for a public elementary school in Aspen, Colo., she envisioned students meditating in the lotus position and chanting "om" to relax before standardized tests. She never fathomed that her proposal would provoke a crusade by Christian fundamentalists and parents who argued to the school board that yoga's Hindu roots conflicted with Jesus' teachings -- and possibly violated the separation of church and state.
OPINION
March 20, 2006 | Swati Pandey
HINDUISM IS a religion with no central text, no single major deity, no governing institution and no definitive rites of practice. This glorious disorder has always been part of its appeal to me. But I can see how it complicated the state Board of Education's contentious, months-long attempt to edit its sixth-grade lesson on Hinduism, which was completed earlier this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2006 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Aiming for compromise in a furor over the portrayal of Hinduism and ancient India in sixth-grade history books, a subcommittee recommended Monday that the California Board of Education adopt several changes to the text but acknowledged that neither side in the heated debate was likely to be satisfied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2006 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
When Abhijit Kurup began learning about Hinduism at his Claremont middle school, he could barely recognize his own religion. Textbooks portrayed the 6,000-year-old tradition as a religion of monkey and elephant gods, rigid caste discrimination and oppression of women, he said. "It degraded my religion," said Kurup, now a UC Riverside freshman. "I felt a mixture of anger, embarrassment and humiliation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Inside the Hindu sanctuary perfumed by incense, four gold-plated statues wore green blindfolds and carnations around their necks. An orange-robed swami entered and lit an oil lamp to invoke the light of knowledge. Then he removed the blindfolds, symbolically unleashing the spiritual presence of four of Hinduism's beloved deities: Lord Rama, his wife, Sita, his brother Lakshmana and his loyal servant Hanuman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Inside the Hindu sanctuary perfumed by incense, four gold-plated statues wore green blindfolds and carnations around their necks. An orange-robed swami entered and lit an oil lamp to invoke the light of knowledge. Then he removed the blindfolds, symbolically unleashing the spiritual presence of four of Hinduism's beloved deities: Lord Rama, his wife, Sita, his brother Lakshmana and his loyal servant Hanuman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pilgrimage that began in India and is expected to encompass 40 countries made its way Sunday to Norwalk, where nearly 2,000 Hindus gathered to pray and call for unity. Called a Yaatra, the worldwide pilgrimage is the first in more than a century and was brought to Southern California in recognition of the area's growing Indian population. Hundreds sat on foam pads in Sanatan Dharma Mandir Temple and Cultural Center's gymnasium to hear speeches calling for unity among Hindus as well as others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The Three Wise Men who came to worship the Christ child hailed from India and named him Isa, or "Lord," in Sanskrit -- a name that became Jesus in the Bible. The star they followed to find the infant Jesus was not a physical celestial body. It was the omniscient "wisdom star of infinite perception" in the spiritual eye, located between the eyebrows, which the wise men accessed through deep meditation.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
One of two teenagers charged in the firebombings of a Hindu temple was sentenced Tuesday to four months in a prison boot camp. Nathaniel Conner, 17, pleaded guilty to second-degree arson and criminal possession of a weapon in the predawn firebombings of the Hindu Temple of St. Louis on Feb. 23 and March 1. Paul Laird, 17, is awaiting trial on identical charges.
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