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Hippie Kitchen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL
Out on the streets, Skid Row was awake and stirring. A homeless man poked through an open trash bin. A family crouched outside a makeshift shelter against a twisted fence made of corrugated metal. And Bernard Dunn was already hanging around the kitchen--the soup kitchen. As Dunn peered hungrily through the doorway, volunteers were hurriedly chopping carrots, rinsing dozens of heads of lettuce and heating the huge pots that would cook up more than 1,000 morning meals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
His name was Green Eyes. But five or six black men with light eyes go by that name on L.A.'s skid row. So he was known as the Green Eyes who sold lighters and cigarettes, a quarter each. Her name was Terry, but she also liked to be called Tracy. She wore her dishwater blond hair in bangs and a high ponytail like in "Grease" or "American Graffiti. " They were 51 years old, both of them. Terry had lived many years with a man named Blaine on the streets near the "Hippie Kitchen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
His name was Green Eyes. But five or six black men with light eyes go by that name on L.A.'s skid row. So he was known as the Green Eyes who sold lighters and cigarettes, a quarter each. Her name was Terry, but she also liked to be called Tracy. She wore her dishwater blond hair in bangs and a high ponytail like in "Grease" or "American Graffiti. " They were 51 years old, both of them. Terry had lived many years with a man named Blaine on the streets near the "Hippie Kitchen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL
Out on the streets, Skid Row was awake and stirring. A homeless man poked through an open trash bin. A family crouched outside a makeshift shelter against a twisted fence made of corrugated metal. And Bernard Dunn was already hanging around the kitchen--the soup kitchen. As Dunn peered hungrily through the doorway, volunteers were hurriedly chopping carrots, rinsing dozens of heads of lettuce and heating the huge pots that would cook up more than 1,000 morning meals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask anybody around skid row and they will tell you about a spiritual oasis. At the corner of 6th Street and Gladys Avenue, hundreds of hungry and homeless line up waiting to be served free food and drink. But unlike the dank atmosphere of some soup kitchens, here people dine in a sun-drenched outdoor garden. Colored streamers hang from the trees and float in the breeze. A fountain gurgles as big, orange goldfish swim in the pond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2006 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
Kim Roberts did not feel safe in shelters. A quiet woman, she shied away from skid row's missions. But she found solace at the Downtown Women's Center, where she went a few times a month for meals and to shower. Jesse Quirino beat addiction and spent 15 years living in units downtown run by the SRO Housing Corp., where he found a job working in the dining hall. Fran Anthony passed out spoons at the Hippie Kitchen run by Catholic Worker on 6th Street and Gladys Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is accustomed to being the center of attention when he holds news conferences. On Tuesday morning, he got upstaged. Villaraigosa traveled to downtown's skid row to announce the installation of 100 light fixtures to discourage narcotics sales and other illegal activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Anybody here in a hurry?" asked William T. Wiley early in the musical performance he and fellow Bay Area artist Michael Henderson gave Friday evening at the Laguna Art Museum. It's a good question, because a perception of their show depends a great deal on how one regards time: If our consciousness extends through eternity, then there surely is room to include the pair's shaggy, ambling performance, just as there is time to be a rock, snail or investment banker for several lifetimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His face was dirty and glistened with sweat, his stubbly jaw was swollen by an abscessed tooth. Paul Newton, who is 45 years old and totes his belongings in a pillowcase, had already been through the lunch line and had his blood pressure checked. But when the USC nursing student offered him a packet of condoms, Newton was defiant. "If I loved someone enough to have sex with them," he demanded, "do you think I would take a chance on a condom breaking?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2007 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
Ted Von der Ahe walks past clusters of shopping carts to reach the well-scrubbed building where he works with food, the commodity that made the Vons grocery heir rich. But these shopping carts are heaped with the ragged belongings of the homeless, and the food is free. Von der Ahe dishes it up as a part-time volunteer for the Los Angeles Catholic Worker soup kitchen on skid row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Take a trip around a lot of Los Angeles' skid row these days and there's something missing: the homeless. A captain in the Los Angeles Police Department's Central Division has decided to do something that for years simply was not done: strictly enforce the laws. During the last few weeks, Capt. Stuart Maislin's officers have been ticketing the homeless for blocking the sidewalk and jaywalking.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Half-eaten hunks of pumpkin pie lay in the gutter beside "Night Time Express" bottles; Styrofoam plates caked with stuffing and cranberries littered the sidewalks; pigeons pecked at heaps of discarded turkey bones. It was the day after Thanksgiving and the signs were everywhere--America's cornucopia had spilled some of its abundance on Skid Row. "I was stuffed," said Bruce Young, a 32-year-old who lives in one of the low-rent hotels fronting 5th Street.
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