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Hiram Bingham Iii

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April 16, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
In July, Machu Picchu, Peru’s biggest tourist attraction, will mark its 100 th anniversary of rediscovery. Hiram Bingham III, a Yale professor, came upon the vine-covered ruins on July 24, 1911. Here, then, as we lead up to the century mark, are 100-plus facts about Machu Picchu, its country, its history and its players. We will post one each day for the next 100 days. 2. Peru shares borders with five countries: Ecuador, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile and Colombia. 1. At 496,218 square miles, Peru, in western South America , is about the size of three Californias.  California, however, has about 8 million more residents than Peru.
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NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Machu Picchu was brought to the world's attention after American Hiram Bingham III rediscovered the Incan site more than a century ago, a blip in time for the high-altitude ruins that date to the 15th century. San Francisco-based Llama Expeditions leads a weeklong trip to Peru that links tours of Incan temples and ruins with modern-day dwellers in the Andes Mountains. The tour begins in Peruvian capital Lima before flying to Cuzco for sightseeing and dinner with a family in their home.
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NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Machu Picchu was brought to the world's attention after American Hiram Bingham III rediscovered the Incan site more than a century ago, a blip in time for the high-altitude ruins that date to the 15th century. San Francisco-based Llama Expeditions leads a weeklong trip to Peru that links tours of Incan temples and ruins with modern-day dwellers in the Andes Mountains. The tour begins in Peruvian capital Lima before flying to Cuzco for sightseeing and dinner with a family in their home.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
At the top of the mountain, where an attendant will take your $46 ticket, foot traffic is steady and cellphone reception is excellent. At the bottom of the same mountain, the town teems with pizzerias, tourists chatter in half a dozen languages and a school band director is herding his traditionally costumed students into formation. "Roki! Roki!" he seems to be hollering. And then, as darkness falls, his young trumpeters and drummers launch into the rousing theme from Sylvester Stallone's first hit movie.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel Editor
This is the last installment of "100 Facts for 100 Years of Machu Picchu. " On July 24, 1911, Hiram Bingham III, a Yale professor, came upon the vine-covered ruins of the ancient Inca city, which the Spanish had overlooked for three centuries. To commemorate the anniversary, look for staff writer Christopher Reynolds ' story on his recent trip to Machu Picchu,  T. Craig Ligibel's story on his father-daughter trek  through the Vilcabamba Mountains and Sarah Karnasiewicz's article on the solitary wonders of Colca Canyon.
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