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Hiro Matsushita

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SPORTS
September 24, 1997 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiro Matsushita sweats through a hot, oppressive afternoon at Roger Penske's California Speedway in Fontana, testing an Indy car that is, even at 220 mph, 10 mph slower than the front-runners he will race this weekend. He could just as easily sit behind a desk in his air-conditioned San Clemente office, acquiring more land, more money. Matsushita owns a commercial real estate company in San Clemente and a sports-marketing agency in Japan.
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SPORTS
March 14, 1998 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Robby Gordon of Orange will return to the CART Championship series as a full-time driver for the Arciero-Wells Racing team in late April, it was announced Friday. Gordon, 29, will assume the driving duties left vacant by Hiro Matsushita, 37, who announced his retirement Wednesday. Team owner Call Wells said Gordon will make his season debut April 26 in Nazareth, Pa.
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SPORTS
March 14, 1998 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Robby Gordon of Orange will return to the CART Championship series as a full-time driver for the Arciero-Wells Racing team in late April, it was announced Friday. Gordon, 29, will assume the driving duties left vacant by Hiro Matsushita, 37, who announced his retirement Wednesday. Team owner Call Wells said Gordon will make his season debut April 26 in Nazareth, Pa.
SPORTS
March 13, 1998 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Hiro Matsushita, the first Japanese Indy-car driver and the first to compete in the Indianapolis 500, announced his retirement Thursday in Homestead, Fla. Matsushita, driver for Rancho Santa Margarita-based Arciero-Wells Racing, will compete through the season's fifth race, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His exit opens the door for Robby Gordon of Orange to return to CART Championship competition on a full-time basis. Gordon, 29, was hired Jan.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | Jerry Hicks
WIND FIGHTERS: If race car driver Hiro Matsushita has his way, the drivers in future Indianapolis 500 races will come to Orange County to test their cars. Matsushita, grandson of the founder of Matsushita International Inc., has won Planning Commission approval to build a major race car research facility in San Clemente. The company will conduct automotive research and build the country's first wind tunnel for testing aerodynamics. . . .
SPORTS
March 13, 1998 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Hiro Matsushita, the first Japanese Indy-car driver and the first to compete in the Indianapolis 500, announced his retirement Thursday in Homestead, Fla. Matsushita, driver for Rancho Santa Margarita-based Arciero-Wells Racing, will compete through the season's fifth race, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His exit opens the door for Robby Gordon of Orange to return to CART Championship competition on a full-time basis. Gordon, 29, was hired Jan.
SPORTS
May 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Today is "bump day" at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but first things first. Before a faster qualifier bumps anybody from the starting lineup for the May 26 Indianapolis 500, the 33-car field has to be filled in time trials. Four spots remain after rookies Buddy Lazier and Hiro Matsushita, veteran Roberto Guerrero and 1983 winner Tom Sneva stole the spotlight on a Saturday that was perfect for qualifying: cool, overcast, with light winds.
SPORTS
April 23, 1990 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Willy T. Ribbs, a black man, competed in Sunday's Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, becoming, by most accounts, the first of his race to drive in a sanctioned Indy car event. Seems a little strange, doesn't it, that here, in 1990, that is a remarkable event? Ten years from the end of the 20th Century and we're still counting black firsts in sports. The obvious question is: "Good heavens, what took so long? We've had blacks in baseball, basketball and football for years.
SPORTS
May 10, 1992 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early-morning showers delayed pole qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 for five hours Sunday, but once the time trials began, they produced a series of track records and 18 starters for the May 24 race. But they did not produce a pole winner. Roberto Guerrero, from San Juan Capistrano, blistered the cool Indianapolis Motor Speedway track under a cloudy sky for a series of laps over 232 m.p.h. in his green Buick-powered Lola, setting a one-lap mark of 232.618 m.p.h.
SPORTS
September 24, 1997 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiro Matsushita sweats through a hot, oppressive afternoon at Roger Penske's California Speedway in Fontana, testing an Indy car that is, even at 220 mph, 10 mph slower than the front-runners he will race this weekend. He could just as easily sit behind a desk in his air-conditioned San Clemente office, acquiring more land, more money. Matsushita owns a commercial real estate company in San Clemente and a sports-marketing agency in Japan.
SPORTS
April 13, 1996 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiro Matsushita was born into one of Japan's wealthiest families. His grandfather, known as the father of Japanese electronics, founded Matsushita Electric Industrial Corp. His father is chairman and an older brother is a director of the billion-dollar conglomerate that owns Panasonic. As an heir to that fortune, Matsushita never had to worry about financial security and could have settled comfortably into the family business.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE
The toughest job for Hiroyuki Matsushita these days is to sit back and watch other people work. The 31-year-old race-car driver, who last year became the first Japanese to qualify for the Indianapolis 500, is hobbled by a cast on his right leg--the result of a car crash during a May Indy 500 practice run. With help from crutches, though, he manages to get around in his jet-black ZR-1 Corvette, which he says can reach 60 miles an hour in just under five seconds.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | Jerry Hicks
WIND FIGHTERS: If race car driver Hiro Matsushita has his way, the drivers in future Indianapolis 500 races will come to Orange County to test their cars. Matsushita, grandson of the founder of Matsushita International Inc., has won Planning Commission approval to build a major race car research facility in San Clemente. The company will conduct automotive research and build the country's first wind tunnel for testing aerodynamics. . . .
SPORTS
May 10, 1992 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early-morning showers delayed pole qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 for five hours Sunday, but once the time trials began, they produced a series of track records and 18 starters for the May 24 race. But they did not produce a pole winner. Roberto Guerrero, from San Juan Capistrano, blistered the cool Indianapolis Motor Speedway track under a cloudy sky for a series of laps over 232 m.p.h. in his green Buick-powered Lola, setting a one-lap mark of 232.618 m.p.h.
SPORTS
May 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Today is "bump day" at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but first things first. Before a faster qualifier bumps anybody from the starting lineup for the May 26 Indianapolis 500, the 33-car field has to be filled in time trials. Four spots remain after rookies Buddy Lazier and Hiro Matsushita, veteran Roberto Guerrero and 1983 winner Tom Sneva stole the spotlight on a Saturday that was perfect for qualifying: cool, overcast, with light winds.
SPORTS
April 13, 1996 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiro Matsushita was born into one of Japan's wealthiest families. His grandfather, known as the father of Japanese electronics, founded Matsushita Electric Industrial Corp. His father is chairman and an older brother is a director of the billion-dollar conglomerate that owns Panasonic. As an heir to that fortune, Matsushita never had to worry about financial security and could have settled comfortably into the family business.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE
The toughest job for Hiroyuki Matsushita these days is to sit back and watch other people work. The 31-year-old race-car driver, who last year became the first Japanese to qualify for the Indianapolis 500, is hobbled by a cast on his right leg--the result of a car crash during a May Indy 500 practice run. With help from crutches, though, he manages to get around in his jet-black ZR-1 Corvette, which he says can reach 60 miles an hour in just under five seconds.
SPORTS
April 23, 1990 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Willy T. Ribbs, a black man, competed in Sunday's Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, becoming, by most accounts, the first of his race to drive in a sanctioned Indy car event. Seems a little strange, doesn't it, that here, in 1990, that is a remarkable event? Ten years from the end of the 20th Century and we're still counting black firsts in sports. The obvious question is: "Good heavens, what took so long? We've had blacks in baseball, basketball and football for years.
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