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Hirokazu Kosaka

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June 6, 2010 | By Samantha Page, Los Angeles Times
Two hundred years ago, Dutch merchants opened shipments of porcelain from Japan to find the packing material was delicate rice paper, printed with brightly colored scenes of Japanese life. When the prints arrived, it didn't take long for some of the artists behind them to be recognized as masters. Mass-produced from carved woodblocks, the images were known as ukiyo-e . Today, the "images of the floating world" continue to be appreciated as more than so many little bits of paper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2010 | By Samantha Page, Los Angeles Times
Two hundred years ago, Dutch merchants opened shipments of porcelain from Japan to find the packing material was delicate rice paper, printed with brightly colored scenes of Japanese life. When the prints arrived, it didn't take long for some of the artists behind them to be recognized as masters. Mass-produced from carved woodblocks, the images were known as ukiyo-e . Today, the "images of the floating world" continue to be appreciated as more than so many little bits of paper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
A student of traditional Japanese archery for the last quarter-century, Hirokazu Kosaka stands just an arrow's length from his target, scrutinizing it. There is no bull's-eye to aim at, no mark of any kind. It's just a bundle of rice-straw tied and cut in a barrel shape about 2 feet in diameter, then placed atop a wooden stand. Impossible to miss. Three feet away, his legs spread wide, Kosaka draws the string of his 7-foot bow and brings the arrow to eye level before firing it straight and deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Robin Rauzi, Robin Rauzi is a Times staff writer
In America, couples first fall in love, then get married. In Japan, traditionally, a marriage is arranged and the love grows afterward. Hirokazu Kosaka says that he and Oguri have something of an arranged marriage. When Kosaka proposed that he and Oguri join forces artistically three years ago, they knew little about one another. In one respect, the match seemed ideal: Both are Los Angeles performers who hail from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Robin Rauzi, Robin Rauzi is a Times staff writer
In America, couples first fall in love, then get married. In Japan, traditionally, a marriage is arranged and the love grows afterward. Hirokazu Kosaka says that he and Oguri have something of an arranged marriage. When Kosaka proposed that he and Oguri join forces artistically three years ago, they knew little about one another. In one respect, the match seemed ideal: Both are Los Angeles performers who hail from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012
ART The Getty's 11-day Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival includes the unveiling of "Kalpa," a site-specific sculptural and performative installation by Hirokazu Kosaka. The piece, which takes its name from the Sanskrit word for "eon," incorporates Butoh dancers, live and recorded music, hundreds of spools of colorful thread, and a wall designed by architect Michael Rotondi. Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, L.A. 7 p.m. Fri. Free, reservations required.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1998
* Film. Festival Hong Kong starts May 22 at the Nuart, 11272 Santa Monica Blvd., with a new 25th anniversary print of Bruce Lee's "Enter the Dragon." Nightly at 5, 7:20, 9:40; midnight shows on Friday, May 22 and 29; Saturdays, Sundays, 12:20 p.m. and 2:40 p.m. Ends May 31. (310) 478-6379. * Theater. Marie Osmond and Victor Talmadge headline in Rodgers and Hammerstein's "The King and I," opening May 19 at the Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, playing Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
* "Swing!," the Broadway musical celebrating the music and dance of the 1930s and '40s, runs Tuesday-Dec. 2 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa, (714) 740-7878, (213) 365-3500, (714) 556-ARTS. $20 to $55. * "Sanders Family Christmas," a down-home musical comedy set in 1941, is playing Nov. 30-Dec. 16 at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts, 14900 La Mirada Blvd., La Mirada, (562) 944-9801. $35.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Many people may not comprehend the sound of one hand clapping, but 184 privileged persons were witness to a 45-minute mind-boggling performance by butoh master Oguri at Japan America Theater's George J. Doizaki Gallery on Saturday night. His collaborators? Wadada Leo Smith, blowing the baddest trumpet and fluegelhorn this side of Miles Davis; Zen archer-artist Hirokazu Kosaka; and three tons of wet clay that not only functioned as a stage but served as a paradisiacal tableau.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Stark white walls and floor with a square black platform in the center transformed the George J. Doizaki Gallery at the Japan America Theatre plaza Friday into an abstraction of apocalypse for the intense improvisational duet "Earthbeat '04: Lightning." Designer Hirokazu Kosaka topped the knee-high platform with broken bits of charcoal, evoking a desolate, burnt-out landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
A student of traditional Japanese archery for the last quarter-century, Hirokazu Kosaka stands just an arrow's length from his target, scrutinizing it. There is no bull's-eye to aim at, no mark of any kind. It's just a bundle of rice-straw tied and cut in a barrel shape about 2 feet in diameter, then placed atop a wooden stand. Impossible to miss. Three feet away, his legs spread wide, Kosaka draws the string of his 7-foot bow and brings the arrow to eye level before firing it straight and deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1999
Little Tokyo businesses and cultural organizations will host a series of free cultural displays and demonstrations this weekend in celebration of the New Year. On Saturday, the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center (244 S. San Pedro St.) will host a gathering of wearers of traditional Japanese kimonos at 1 p.m., followed by a 1:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
For its 20th round of fellowships to Los Angeles County visual artists, the California Community Foundation is awarding $280,000 in one-year fellowships to 15 emerging and mid-career artists in painting, photography, collage, drawing, sculpture and multimedia. "L.A. is sort of considered the creative capital of the world, and yet we cannot sustain creativity," foundation President and Chief Executive Antonia Hernandez said this week.
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