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Hiromu Nonaka

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NEWS
April 17, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's prime minister is Keizo Obuchi, but the shadow shogun truly running the world's second-largest economy, many insiders say, is the enigmatic and widely feared politician Hiromu Nonaka. Though little known outside Japan beyond his role as government spokesman, the prime minister's chief Cabinet secretary wields enormous power here. Nonaka's shrewd political tactics are credited with keeping the Obuchi administration alive for more than nine months, far longer than many expected.
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NEWS
April 17, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's prime minister is Keizo Obuchi, but the shadow shogun truly running the world's second-largest economy, many insiders say, is the enigmatic and widely feared politician Hiromu Nonaka. Though little known outside Japan beyond his role as government spokesman, the prime minister's chief Cabinet secretary wields enormous power here. Nonaka's shrewd political tactics are credited with keeping the Obuchi administration alive for more than nine months, far longer than many expected.
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BUSINESS
April 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Japan's jobless rate shot up to yet another record high of 4.8% last month, as corporate restructuring efforts forced more people out of work, the government said today. The latest figure sets a record after the jobless rate hit an all-time high of 4.6% in February. "The unemployment situation is becoming increasingly severe. And it is our most important task to tackle the situation," Chief Cabinet Secretary Hiromu Nonaka said. Income for wage earners in the fiscal year ended March 31 fell 1.
NEWS
September 3, 1998 | Associated Press
Japan's military went on increased alert today to prepare for a possible second ballistic missile test launch by North Korea, a Defense Agency spokesman said. The spokesman, Hiromitsu Kuwano, declined to specify what measures Japan was taking, or what information the government had that a test was planned. Japanese media also quoted Hiromu Nonaka, chief Cabinet secretary, as saying the government had information that the launch could be held as early as Saturday.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a move that could spell more trouble for beleaguered Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, the top lieutenant in his ruling party resigned today. Liberal Democratic Party Secretary-General Hiromu Nonaka, the eminence grise of the long-dominant party, told reporters that he had met with Mori and tendered his resignation, which Mori had accepted.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Japan's top police official, in charge of the investigation of last week's deadly nerve gas attack on Tokyo's subways, was shot four times by a masked assailant this morning. Takaji Kunimatsu, 57, chief of the National Police Agency, was shot from behind as he was leaving his condominium on the way to work. The gunman, wearing a black raincoat and white surgical mask, fled by bicycle. Kunimatsu, who sustained injuries in his shoulder, stomach and leg, is in stable condition at a hospital.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
A leader of Japan's ruling party tried Sunday to quash a mutiny by its legislators, threatening to expel party members who support a vote in parliament to remove Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori. The tough stance by Liberal Democratic Party Secretary-General Hiromu Nonaka signaled that the party leadership had given up on attempts at compromise to heal the deepening rift ahead of the no-confidence motion, expected today.
NEWS
June 7, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors indicted cult leader Shoko Asahara and six aides Tuesday on charges of murder and attempted murder, bringing to a climax the investigations of a March nerve gas attack on the subway system here. Nine other cult members were formally charged with carrying out preparations for murder by making the sarin poison gas and assembling the facilities to produce it.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori failed early today by a vote of 237 to 190 after rebel factions within Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party abruptly abandoned plans to join the opposition in seeking his ouster. The vote means that Mori could limp along in office until July, when elections are scheduled for the upper house of parliament, or even until his term officially ends in September.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | From Reuters
Efforts to cobble together a coalition government between Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party and a conservative opposition party looked more like a forced marriage today, with the two sides divided on an array of issues. One of the most important rifts keeping them from consummating their ties, aimed at ensuring the survival of the unpopular government of Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, is over the Cabinet post being offered to the feisty Ichiro Ozawa.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As this nation's top police official recovers from being shot four times by a mystery gunman earlier this week, Japan is still reeling from this year's unrelenting episodes of violent crime and natural disaster. Home Affairs Minister Hiromu Nonaka on Friday called the assassination attempt on the chief of the National Police Agency, Takaji Kunimatsu, 57, "a challenge against the state and democracy and a disgrace in front of the world."
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